Autumn Haiku

After reading Write Out: Gathering Sensory Details for Haiku on Kevin’s blog I though we could join in. We are a little late for Write Out which inspired this, on holiday last week.

We watched the video embedded on Kevin’s blog and looked at his classes examples. Then we went out into the playground. A cold breeze and some drizzle did stop the Biggies gathering words. Back inside we polished these a little.

September Poems

We have been reading a book called Love that Dog In the book Jack tell of his literacy lessons with Miss Stretchberry. Miss Stretchberry read the class poems and Jack tries to write some. At the start he does not like it.  The Book also tells the story of Jack’s dog.

We have learnt about several different types of poem and tried to write our own.

The First type of poem we learnt about was imagist poems. Imagist poems try to make an image with words. We learnt about Lunes. Lunes have very few words, 11 in total, three in the first line, five in the second and three in the third. We wrote kennings, these are like riddles. We tried our hand at sound poems and shape poems.

We also read the Poem The Table by the Turkish poet Edip Cansever and wrote our own version.

Pupils’ Views

I’ve taken some quotes from the classes e-Portfolios where they reflected on the writing.

I liked writing my poems because you can write random words and the don’t have to make sense and you can write some and they can be as long and as short as you want .

When I was writing this poem I was thinking about a ewe lamb sale that I went to about a week ago. I thought I could think about what I brought back with me from the sale and I thought that could write a table poem about and what we got back from it

I enjoyed writing poems because it let me experience and explore different ways of writing and I enjoys how many things there are in this universe to write about but still it’s so hard to pick just one for a poem, I enjoyed how punctuation doesn’t alway need to be in a poem, how poems don’t need to make sense and how poems can be enjoyed by anyone anywhere at anytime!

I was thinking to make a dog poem and the kind of I’m going to was a Kenning I enjoyed making the poem because you learn something all the time.

I liked writing the something poem because it’s a concrete poem, it was really fun to write with all the different ways you can say the word, normal, with a capital letter, backwards, full stops in between, commas, all capitals with just one word. I also enjoyed some lunes that I was writing because it doesn’t take long.

I enjoyed writing poems because you get freedom to write with rhythm and beat and writing stories you can’t do that and poems don’t need to make sense.

I enjoyed writing poems because they don’t need to make sense and you can play about with the words that you are writing. It’s also fun because there are so many different ways to write poetry and you can learn new ways.

I like writing poetry because of the freedom. It doesn’t have to mean anything it could just be The Apple all over again. I like the amount of stuff that you can do it doesn’t has to be a number of words before the next line.

I liked the onomatopoeia in my poem.

I enjoyed writing poems because you could do anything you’d want with it and do things that isn’t real you also do a lot of punctuation and you get your brain moving then if you really like it you could show your teacher and they will like it to. It is really fun to write poems and my class is lucky we get a teacher that likes poems so we do things about poems almost everyday. That is why I enjoy poems.

Playground Poets

These poems were written on a sunny morning in the playground.

We tried to describe what we saw and what was happening as clearly as possible without adjective or adverbs.

 

playground poems

Continue reading “Playground Poets”

Primary Six Poets go Down to the Woods

On Thursday the primary sixes for both p6-7 & p4-5-6 went down to the woods.

We were going to do a little Earth Day prep, but also to play games and read and write poems.

It was quite cold to be sitting long  so we warmed up with  running around game. All  the children really all concentrated on writing and drawing in their tiny notebooks.

Scots poems

We have been reading and listening to some Scots poems this week. Yesterday we had a try at writing out own. Click on the thumbnails to read them.

Rocks by Elise
TREES by Joshua Luka
Islay by Grace
Gracie n Cosmo by Kaitlyn McCulloch
Tons a Dugs by Skye
Wee cats by Rhuraidh Gordon James
Fush by Kristy
Connie by Caelan

small poems

We have been reading some poems by Valerie Worth. She specialised in poem focused on an animal or inanimate object of some type. They are short, simple and descriptive. They do not rhyme and the line breaks can be odd.

After reading the poems and thinking about the different features and techniques the class wrote some of their own. We tried to make the poems put a picture in your mind, use simple language and short lines.

fish

elephant

village

star

oak-tree

robin

piano

robin

robin

a dog

the westie

Dog

lion

gun

islay

ziggy

I Come From

We have been reading a couple of poems called I come from by Robert Seattar and Dean Atta. We found them on the Breadalbane Academy P7 Poetry Blog where that class has written some poems too.

We wrote our own, they are pretty great:

featured Image by Strebe and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Raven Poems

We saw a couple of ravens flying high above our playground last week. The Biggies have been reading poems in The Lost Words again. After reading The Raven we watched some youtube videos of Ravens flying:

We then wrote our own poems in the Kenning form.

The class created a huge list of verbs to describe what ravens do and adjectives to describe them. We turned our verbs into nouns to write the kennings.

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