Category Archives: Literacy and English

Mark Making

The children have been busy enjoying exploring different ways of mark making inside the nursery and outside in the gardens. Mark making gives children the opportunity to express themselves and explore using a variety of tools and materials, while also supporting development of fine motor skills and hand eye coordination.  Furthermore, mark making allows children to develop their creativity and imagination, and communicate their feelings.

Here are a few photos to show you what the children have been doing:

Paper and Pens

“My butterflies are flying away in the sky.”

Paint and brush

“Do you like my stripes?”

Chalk

“I like drawing outside with the chalk”

Large floor drawing

“I’m using lots of crayons to draw lots and lots of circles.”

Playdough stampers

“They look like little flowers.”

Car ramp tyre print

“My car is going down really fast.  I can see the paint.”

Gloop

“It feels all sticky on my fingers.”

Rollerball painting

“The balls are mixing all the paint together.”

Salt

“I’m drawing an aeroplane.”

Feather writing

“This is quite tricky to hold the feather.”

Large painting

“Can you reach up to the top like me?”

Shaving Foam

“My hands are so messy.”

There are many more mark making ideas that you could try at home such as ice writing, mud painting, shadow drawing or crayon rubbings on different textures.

Please remember to share your learning on Twitter @Glenwood FC #Glenwoodlearningathome

Story Stones

Story stones are great resources for developing children’s communication skills, promoting their language skills and encouraging their imagination and creativity.

Here are some ideas you can use story stones for at home..

  • Add the story stones to a sensory bin.
  • Place them face-down on a table. Children can begin a story and then flip over a story stone to incorporate that idea or prompt. Remember it does not need to be in sequential order!
  • Read a book together with your child. After the book, tell the story again using the story stones. 
  • Play Kim’s game and see if the children can identify what character or scene is missing.
  • Practice sequencing stories by lining the story stones up in the order of a story.

When using the story stones use language such as:

  • Once upon a time..
  • The next thing to happen…
  • Suddenly…

These phrases help develop your child’s ability to predict and retell stories they are both familiar and unfamiliar with.

All you need to make your own story stones are:

  • Stones of any shape, size and colour
  • Paints or paint pens

If you try this at home, why not share your photographs with us on Twitter @GlenwoodFC

 

Bookbug at Glenwood

In all our rooms we love exploring our favourite books. We use puppets and props to help us retell traditional tales.

 

 

 

“The troll is scary! He tries to eat the goats. I like the bit when the goat hits him with its horns.”

Taking part in regular Bookbug sessions, we have enjoyed listening to familiar stories and we have been learning some new songs, as well as reciting our favourite nursery rhymes.

Look out for links to our Google meet Bookbug sessions next week for Math Week Scotland and you can join in from home too!

Playdough and loose parts play

The orchard bubble have been busy! 

The orchard bubble has shown a great interest in making playdough over the last few weeks. The children have taken responsibility for their own learning by coming up with different ideas of how they want to create their playdough from colours and texture.  “I want blue.”

       

 

 

“I want pink.”

 

 

 

The children had shown an interest in loose parts and wanted to include this in their playdough experience. By incorporating loose parts with playdough the children are developing their fine motor skills. They use a variety of movements such as pressing, rolling and stretching. This will help to strengthen the muscles in their hand which in turn will help them with their writing skills.

 

“I want to use leaves.”       

 

 “Oooohhh feathers.”

 

 

The children showed ownership over their creations and seemed to enjoy the fact that they could start again when one model was finished. They did show interest in taking them home so our next steps will be trying to create models with loose parts and clay. 
 

 

“Can we take them home?”

Musicality benefits

From a very young age children benefit in all areas of their development when taking part in musicality sessions.

Literacy

  1. Helps children understand the meaning and the sound of words.
  2. Helps develop their listening skills (loud, quiet)
  3. Rhyming
  4. Syllables (clapping out)
  5. Helps them predict
  6. Imagination
  7. Conversation
  8. Follow instruction

 

Maths

  1. Counting beats
  2. Number song
  3. Recognition of numbers
  4. Recognition of Shapes And their names
  5. Rhythm pattern

  

Gross and fine motor motor skills

  1. Jumping, hopping, skipping and dancing.
  2. Helps them develop and control their body movements.
  3. Better control at manipulating objects (instruments)
  4. Helps strengthen their muscles.
  5. Moving the instruments in all different directions(up downside to side, front back)

Social and emotional skills

  1. Interaction with other children.
  2. Introduction to different kinds of music and cultural differences awareness.
  3. Increasing confidence in performing
  4. Sharing resources.

  

 

 

INFORMATION COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY

Through play opportunities children can experience a range of resources that support their ICT knowledge and understanding.

CHOOSING ICT TOYS

In Glenwood, the children can choose ICT from a choosing book. The children chose a voice recordable game which supports children’s numeracy and literacy skills.

TORCHES

During their learning the children were interested in the shapes and patterns made by the light and shadows outdoors in the sunshine. To re-create shadows indoors light from a torch was projected onto a hanging sheet. The children used their bodies and open-ended resources to explore shadows, identify shapes or people from behind the sheet.

BEE-BOT

The children programmed a small robot to move forward, backwards, left and right movements to move around the floor. A programmable toy can support literacy and numeracy skills.

REMOTE CONTROL TOYS

Using remote-control toys children learn about cause-and-effect. As they play as they work out which buttons make the car go in each direction. The children set up an obstacle course with ramps to drive up and down, or tunnels for them to drive through. This is a great way to develop a child’s hand-eye co-ordination. Some of our remote control toys are operated by the iPad.

INTERACTIVE BOARD

An interactive smart board allows images from a computer screen to be displayed onto a classroom board where the children can interact with the images directly on the screen using a tool or even a finger.

IPADS/TABLETS

Ipads are available as part of the nursery’s continuous provision and children are encouraged to use them to record their achievements and share it with others using the ipads.

IMAGINARY PLAY

During their imaginary role-play children are provided with old ICT equipment. Children are observed in the home corner using the ICT in real life situations i.e. an office, a train or even a trip to space.

EXPLORING ICT AND HOW IT WORKS

Taking apart old pieces of everyday ICT equipment to look at what is inside and how it works is a popular activity. Children explore the inside of old clocks, computer boards, telephones and CD players.

How big is a dinosaur?

Many of the children have been enjoying playing with the new dinosaurs. We had lots of questions so we watched some videos on Tig Tag Junior. We learned about how they became extinct. 

When a big space rock made some dust it made the place go dark. Then without sunlight the plants died. Then without plants the plant-eating dinosaurs died. Then all the meat-eaters died. Then they all started to die. Extinct.” 

“What size was a T-Rex?” 

We used books to research and discovered that a Tyrannosaurus rex was 12 metres long. Would it fit in our playroom? Let’s find out by measuring…

“I need to measure and write it down.”

   

Our playroom is 10 metres long – “T-rex’s head would be next door!” Which dinosaur is smallest? We researched on the iPad. Compsognathus was 60cm long and 40cm tall.

“How tall are you?”

 Let’s put them in order… 

“This one is taller.”
“Brachiosaurus is the biggest.”
“How long is Triceratops?”
“The T-rexs are the same size.”

 

Remote Learning: Time to Rhyme

Rhyming words are words that have the same ending sound: bat & cat, frog & log, car & star… Learning to recognise rhyme is an important step in learning to read.

Nursery Rhymes – Sharing songs and nursery rhymes with young children is the first step towards this and also helps create a bond with their carers.

Find out more: https://www.scottishbooktrust.com/reading-and-stories/why-share-songs-and-rhymes

The Scottish Book Trust has a Bookbug App for you to share stories, songs and rhymes together. Find out more here.

The CBeebies website also has lots of nursery rhymes to share. Click here.

Once your child understands rhyme you could make up some silly ones together… why not try Humpty Dumpty?

Humpty Dumpty sat in a tree, he fell down and hurt his …

Humpty Dumpty sat on a bed, he fell down and broke his…

Or Twinkle, Twinkle?

Twinkle, Twinkle little mouse, hiding in your little…

Twinkle, Twinkle little moon, I’d like to eat you with a …

Rhyming Stories – Lots of children’s stories are written in rhyme. As you read with your child, try missing out the last word to let them fill it in.

Here are just a few authors who write rhyming stories:

  • Lynley Dodd – Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy
  • Jez Alborough – Fix It Duck, Some Dogs Do
  • Kes Gray – Oi Frog, Oi Dog, Oi Cat, How Many Legs?
  • Nick Sharratt – Chocolate Mousse for Greedy Goose, Don’t Put Your Finger in the Jelly, Nelly!, Octopus Socktopus
  • Giles Andreae – Commotion in the Ocean, Mad About Minibeasts
  • Clare Freedman – Aliens Love Underpants
  • Dr Seuss – The Cat in the Hat, Green Eggs and Ham

One of our favourite authors is Julia Donaldson and some of her rhyming stories have been made into animations. Why not watch some together? Zog and the Flying Doctors 

Rhyme Games 

Create a rhyming basket – Collect together pairs of rhyming objects – they could be toys or household items. Take out an object… can you find it’s rhyming partner?

Go on a rhyming treasure hunt – Collect together some objects again but this time challenge your child to find a rhyme around your house or garden. You might put in a star (to rhyme with car), a parrot (rhymes with carrot), a bee (to match with knee or tree), a cat (rhymes with mat or hat) or a bear (to rhyme with pear). I’m sure you will think of many more!

Play I-Spy – On a walk or in the house, you could play a rhyming version of I-spy…

I spy with my little eye, something that rhymes with bee.

I spy with my little eye, something that rhymes with bog.

It’s OK if your child makes up nonsense words – that means that they have understood the concept of rhyme.

Why not play this rhyming game on the computer with Grover from Sesame Street?

Share you rhyming fun on Google Classroom or Twitter @GlenwoodFC   #Glenwoodlearningathome

Loose Parts

Did you know, Loose Parts have no specific function or goal?

They can be moved, arranged, designed, taken apart and more!

Using loose parts the children explored patterns, building, and teamwork. By using the blocks, small cuts of wood, guttering and some cardboard boxes, they were able to build a house with a chimney and talk to each other about the placement of the resources!

There are a variety of resources lying around within your home that can be utilised as loose parts such as:

  • Pots and pans
  • Spoons, sieves and mashers
  • Tin foil
  • Sheets
  • Sticks, leaves
  • Plastic bottles, bottle tops

Check out the poster for more ideas!

When children interact with loose parts, they enter a world of “what if” that promotes the type of thinking that leads to problem solving and theoretical reasoning. Loose parts enhance children’s ability to think imaginatively and see solutions… the use of loose parts is open ended and limitless!

Remote Learning- Literacy

If you can only do one thing to benefit your child while they are not in nursery, it is read a story a day. This can be a new story each day or you can revisit the same old favourite every day for a week…it doesn’t matter as long as you spend some time together and share the experience. Books are not just for bedtime- they can be read anywhere and anytime. And you don’t even need a book- why not make up stories together?

You can visit our stoytelling sway to hear stories read by the Glenwood team –

https://sway.office.com/owYdSVGZFjBJJ2qA?ref=Link

Similarly, sharing songs and rhymes also supports literacy development.  Why not visit the Bookbug website for ideas-

https://www.scottishbooktrust.com/songs-and-rhymes

Alternatively, why not try the BBC radio website for nursery rhymes (rather than YouTube)-

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/school-radio/nursery-rhymes-songs-index/zhwdgwx

 

A foggy morning

Today as we came to nursery we were quite excited about the foggy morning.

Some of us read a story about fog.

When we went outdoors we easily spotted the spider webs because of the cold, foggy morning.

We went on a search for some more webs and discovered some spiders on the webs.

Come and see the spider’s web I found.” Jacob

”I want to see the spiders too.” Azan

The spiders are orange or black.” Jacob

We are having a picnic!

We love to have pretend picnics in the quiet room… so we decided to have a real one! We wrote invitations to invite our friends and we had lots of preparations to do. 

We made bunting to decorate the room.

We planned our menu. Once we decided what we wanted to eat we made shopping lists and will be visiting the shops to purchase what we need.

      We can’t wait to have our picnic!

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt

We love to hear stories and we have been listening to one of our favourites read to us by the author. Michael Rosen is the author of “We’re Going on a Bear Hunt” and we can join in with the actions as he reads this story.

We loved this story so much we decided to make props and puppets to retell it. We made a big bear puppet and some long swishy grass.

I wonder what else we will need to make to tell this story?