Tag Archives: numeracy

Playdough and loose parts play

The orchard bubble have been busy! 

The orchard bubble has shown a great interest in making playdough over the last few weeks. The children have taken responsibility for their own learning by coming up with different ideas of how they want to create their playdough from colours and texture.  “I want blue.”

       

 

 

“I want pink.”

 

 

 

The children had shown an interest in loose parts and wanted to include this in their playdough experience. By incorporating loose parts with playdough the children are developing their fine motor skills. They use a variety of movements such as pressing, rolling and stretching. This will help to strengthen the muscles in their hand which in turn will help them with their writing skills.

 

“I want to use leaves.”       

 

 “Oooohhh feathers.”

 

 

The children showed ownership over their creations and seemed to enjoy the fact that they could start again when one model was finished. They did show interest in taking them home so our next steps will be trying to create models with loose parts and clay. 
 

 

“Can we take them home?”

Musicality benefits

From a very young age children benefit in all areas of their development when taking part in musicality sessions.

Literacy

  1. Helps children understand the meaning and the sound of words.
  2. Helps develop their listening skills (loud, quiet)
  3. Rhyming
  4. Syllables (clapping out)
  5. Helps them predict
  6. Imagination
  7. Conversation
  8. Follow instruction

 

Maths

  1. Counting beats
  2. Number song
  3. Recognition of numbers
  4. Recognition of Shapes And their names
  5. Rhythm pattern

  

Gross and fine motor motor skills

  1. Jumping, hopping, skipping and dancing.
  2. Helps them develop and control their body movements.
  3. Better control at manipulating objects (instruments)
  4. Helps strengthen their muscles.
  5. Moving the instruments in all different directions(up downside to side, front back)

Social and emotional skills

  1. Interaction with other children.
  2. Introduction to different kinds of music and cultural differences awareness.
  3. Increasing confidence in performing
  4. Sharing resources.

  

 

 

Remote Learning: Pancakes

Healthy Henry

Healthy Henry likes to eat healthy food but he says it’s OK to have a treat sometimes.

As it’s Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day, Mrs Collins would like to share her pancake recipe with you.

Mrs Collin’s Pancakes

First of all you will have to wash your hands with soap and water to make sure they are clean and dry them well. If you have an apron you can wear this as well to keep your clothes clean .

You will need:

  • mixing bowl 
  • wooden spoon 
  • tablespoon
  • mug 
  • frying pan
  • spatula 

 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 level mug of  self raising flour 
  • 1 level tablespoon of caster sugar 
  • 1 egg 
  • 1 cup of milk for mixing 
  • Oil for your pan 

Method: 

1. Put the flour and sugar into the bowl.
2. Add the egg and mix well.
3. Then gradually add the milk to make a runny consistency – you might not use all the milk.
  1. Mix until smooth.

Now we can start making our pancakes. 

First of all you will need to ask an adult to help you with this part as we are going to use the cooker and we have to be very careful  so we don’t get burnt . 

We need the frying pan to be hot. 

So put a little drop of oil in the pan and wait until it is hot.

Put a spoonful of your mixture into the pan and wait for the bubbles and then turn and cook the other side.

Turn the pancakes over when you see the bubbles.

I made 12 pancakes out of my mixture you could make big pancakes or small pancakes it is up to you.

Here are some ideas for toppings:

  • Jam 
  • Banana 
  • Butter 
  • Chocolate spread  (but just a little) 

 

Mrs Collins hopes you have as much fun making them as she did.

What toppings will you choose?

Cooking together provides us with lots of opportunities to practise our maths skills – measuring out our ingredients, talking about colours, shapes and sizes, using a timer – as well as helping develop fine motor skills – chopping, mixing, spreading – and literacy skills as we read a recipe.

Here are some other ideas for simple cooking activities:

  • sandwiches
  • fruit salad or fruit kebabs
  • pitta bread pizzas
  • vegetable soup

Let us know what you like to cook together and show us your pancakes on Google Classroom or Twitter @GlenwoodFC  #Glenwoodlearningathome 

Remote Learning: Everyday Counting

Achieving Andrew

Children learn about numbers by hearing number sequences over and over and learning the number names. Through play and everyday activities is a natural way that children will learn.

There are lots of things you can do at home with your children to learn number sequence.

 

  • When you bring the shopping home can you count how many apples/bananas/blueberries you bought?
  • If you have stairs. How many do you have?
  • How many small/big steps is it from your front door to the gate?
  • A scavenger hunt. Can you find 8 leaves, 5 stones, 4 sticks.

Number songs are another great way to learn number sequences. Here are some Glenwood favourites (click on them to watch a Youtube video):

Playing board  and card games is another way to develop number recognition and practise counting.

  • Snakes and Ladders
  • Kids Monopoly
  • Snap (using playing cards)
  • Bingo
Play Splat! – say a number and ‘splat’ the correct card.

Another favourite game we play in Glenwood is Number Splat. This is a great way to develop number recognition. All you need is numbers 0-10 or 0-20 written on pieces of paper and a spatula or wooden spoon. Ask your child to splat different numbers in a random order. Why not have a competition?

Share with us on Google Classroom or Twitter how you have been practising your counting and number recognition. @GlenwoodFC #Glenwoodlearningathome

 

Remote Learning: Sorting and Matching

Sorting and matching objects is an important mathematical skill for young children to develop. It helps children to develop their thinking and awareness of number and quantity.  Children organise, match and sort items in different ways, by colour, shape, design, size, and sometimes using their own criteria. They may sort by using simple  categories such as colour, size or shape, or by using categories such as, type of transport (cars, trains, boats) or types of animals (farm, zoo, sea). Matching encourages children to look for similarities and differences. 

Here are just a few ideas… 

Sorting toys You could start by asking your child to gather some of their favourite  toys  (maybe suggest small toys like Lego or animals) then ask them to sort them using different criteria, shape, colour or size. 

Loose parts are things like bottle tops, buttons, beads or natural objects – there are many wonderful possibilities.

You might choose stones or shells of different colours, shapes, sizes and textures.

Loose parts can provide good opportunities to challenge children’s thinking because of variations – Will all the different shades of blue go in one set? How will you decide if an item is ‘big’ or ‘small’? Encourage your child to explain why they have chosen to put an object in a particular set.

Household sorting jobs 

  • Putting away the shopping – sorting the fruit, vegetables, tins, frozen food into the correct places.
  • You could talk to your child about what you are doing as you sort and separate clothes for washing (whites, colours, and darks) or get them to help you sort and match socks.
  • At lunchtime or dinner time encourage children to set the table by matching knives and forks or plates with cups, you could talk about the different sizes of spoons you might use. How many will you need?
  • Involve them in  recycling waste (paper, plastic, cans and food waste).
  • Will you read a story (fiction) book together or will you choose non-fiction? Are they all muddled up on the book shelf?
  • Putting toys away into the right place!

Putting in order of size

Challenge your child to put a selection of items into size order – coins, sticks, shoes or lego bricks perhaps. This encourages measuring skills as well.

Play Odd One Out

Show your child 3 objects, start simple perhaps 2 red and 1 blue – can they spot the odd one out? As they get the idea, increase the challenge – perhaps a red car, a blue car and a green train.

Let your child have a turn at choosing the items for you to say which is the odd one out.

Mrs Russell wonders who can spot the odd one out in the picture below… remember to say why!

Show us what you have been sorting and matching on Google Classroom or Twitter @Glenwood FC  #Glenwoodlearningathome

 

Remote Learning – Healthy Tuck Shop

Miss Bibby has been thinking about ways you can use money in your house.

One way I thought of is to set up your very own healthy snack shop.

My snack shop is going to have apples, tangerines, strawberries, blueberries, carrot sticks, peppers and celery for sale.

 

 

 

You and your family can take turns at both selling and buying your snacks.

You could make it a bit easier by putting the coins on the price list.

Why not see what coins you can recognise and use these to buy your snacks?

This activity will help develop numeracy skills such as coin and number recognition.

Don’t forget to share your tuck shop with us on Twitter or Google Classrooms  #Glenwoodlearningathome

Remote Learning – Number Sense

Number Sense is when a person has a sense of what numbers mean, understands their relationship to one another, can perform mental arithmetic and can use numbers in real situations.

At Glenwood we play games that help us to develop our number sense. All of these ideas can be adapted to suit the stage of individual children – make the numbers and quantities smaller or larger to give the appropriate amount of challenge.

We like to add an element of competition to add to the fun and will play several games in a row for a short time each.

Saying Number Sequences – Forwards and backwards: this can be as simple as counting together as you climb up the stairs, kick a football or count down to begin a race. Try saying alternate numbers as you count, or clapping for each number.

Recognising and sequencing numerals:

Point to each number as you say it – go forwards and backwards.
Cover a number – Which one is missing from the sequence?
Play Splat! – say a number and ‘splat’ the correct card.

Counting Visible Items:

Count out the correct number of items onto the plate or match the correct numeral to the set.
Use a pack of cards and count out the same number that is shown – see who can do it fastest.

Spatial Patterns: These are the dot patterns that are on dice or dominoes – we learn to recognise the pattern and can say how many spots there are without counting them.

Roll a dice and count out the correct number – take turns and see who has the most at the end. Add the spots on two dice together for a challenge…

Subitising: Our brains are very clever – they can tell us ‘how many’ items are in a small group without us counting!

Hide a small number of objects under a cloth…
…lift up the cloth just for a few seconds – How many did you see?

You could try using more than one colour and asking how many of each colour.

We hope you will try out some of these games with your family… have fun and let us know which you enjoyed most.

@GlenwoodFC  #Glenwoodlearningathome

Remote Learning – Independent Play

While we always recognise the importance of parent-child interactions and playing together there are also many benefits to independent play.  This can provide opportunity for children to problem-solve, experiment, use their initiative and develop their perseverance and independence. As parents right now you may be juggling working from home, helping other children with school work and other challenging situations. This blog has some suggestions of experiences where once set up, children will have the opportunity to play independently or with siblings.

Provocations are “invitations to play”.  Setting up children’s toys a little differently might invite new found enthusiasm for old toys and encourage children to use them in new and inventive ways.

Playdough

Playdough takes around 10 minutes to make and can keep for weeks in an air-tight container.  Playing with dough or clay develops children’s fine motor skills, sensory awareness, language skills, numeracy skills and imagination.

Quick Uncooked Playdough Recipe:

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/playdough-recipe

Cooked Playdough Recipe (this is a slightly more complicated but keeps for longer):

https://www.thebestideasforkids.com/playdough-recipe/

There are many different things you could put out to use with playdough – rollers, cutters, safety knives, safety scissors, potato mashers, cake tins, bowls, jars, cupcake cases, candles, straws, stampers, pipe cleaners, matchsticks, lollipop sticks, leaves, flowers, sticks, stones…

Den Building

Den building helps to develop children problem-solving skills, motor skills, imagination and communication skills. It is a wonderful learning experience and so much fun to play in once constructed! To build a den you could use sheets, blankets, tables, chairs, sofas, pillows, clothes pegs, cardboard boxes. Once the den is built children could take in soft toys, dolls, books, puzzles, drawing materials, torches, a picnic…

Small World Play

Small world play develops imagination, creativity, language skills and problem-solving skills. Combine a selection of resources to create an exciting new world to explore. You could use cars, trains, toy people, animals, dinosaurs, fabric, scarves, cardboard boxes, masking tape, cardboard tubes…


 

 

 

 

 

Dressing Up Box

Role-play helps children to make sense of real-life situations, express their ideas and imagination and develop their language skills. The imagination of children can turn anything into a wonderful new costume.  To create a dressing up box you could use hats, scarves, bangles, bags, shoes, mirrors…

Creation Station 

This will develop children’s creativity, fine motor skills and literacy skills. You could use different colours and sizes of paper, old wallpaper, dry erase board, chalk board, old magazines to cut out, notebooks, post-it notes, felt tip pens, colouring pencils, crayons, junk modelling materials, glue, masking tape….

Mrs Ross created all of these provocations from things she found at home, each took no longer than 5 minutes to set up. Of course, this will take a bit more time if you are able to do together with your child but this will allow them to share their ideas with you and follow their interests. Remember they may have a different vision from you so follow their lead! We hope these give you some ideas for fun you can have both together and for your child to explore independently. Please share your ideas with your child’s friends by Tweeting @GlenwoodFC  #Glenwoodlearningathome

Remote Learning – Transient Art

Mrs Wilson has been busy finding loose parts at home to create some transient art.   Transient art is a term used to describe art that is non-permanent and continually evolving, where a variety of materials are used to create pictures, patterns or models.

The non-permanent nature of this art means that children can move, change and experiment with the materials used until they are happy with what they have achieved.  As well as developing their fine motor skills children also grow in confidence at making decisions as they design and redesign their ideas.

Working on transient art projects is a fun way to develop creativity and encourages children to explore materials and develop an understanding of their senses.

The loose parts used provide an ideal opportunity to talk about texture, colour and size.  Using loose parts also develops skills in numeracy and mathematics such as sorting, matching, counting, pattern making, exploring shapes and learning about symmetry.

 

 

Ideas for loose parts to use at home (although the list is endless).

Beads    Buttons   Sequins   Bottle lids   Corks   Lollipop sticks   Coins   Feathers   Spoons   Colouring pens   Cotton reels   Clothes pegs   Paper clips   Curtain rings

Natural materials are ideal to use if creating an outdoors transient art project.

Stones    Sticks   Twigs   Pine cones   Shells   Leaves   Flower petals

Transient art projects to try at home

  • Draw a straight, zigzag, or spiral line for your child to make a pattern on.
  • Use a picture frame to design a picture in.
  • Create a picture on or in front of a mirror.
  • Fill a shallow tray with water and use that to make a design in.
  • Challenge your child to create a symmetrical picture.
  • Use the loose parts to ‘write’ your name.

Before you tidy away your loose parts you could take a picture of your transient art and send a tweet to @Glenwood FC  #Glenwoodlearningathome

 

Remote Learning – Upcycling Challenge: Create Your Own Game

Mrs Silvester has set you a challenge! Can you create your own dice game at home?

Remember to share your ideas by tweeting @GlenwoodFC  #Glenwoodlearningathome

Here are a few ideas to get you started…

The lids from milk jugs have been used to make these little Plastic Lid Ladybirds for a number dice game.  To make the ladybird draw or use some button type eyes and pen dots on your lids. To Play the game, roll the dice and match the spots or numbers on the ladybird number lids to the dice.

 

What are dice good for?

Dice are great for introducing turn taking and encouraging early maths skills such as: counting, matching, comparing and number recognition.

Find some more number games on the CBeebies website by clicking the link below.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/joinin/numberblocks-help-your-child-with-maths 

 

Remote Learning – Block Play

When playing with blocks children are using a number of different skills. These include measuring, counting, teamwork, talking to each other, problem solving and many more.

In Glenwood we have recently started using the 7 stages of block play. We use the stages to determine what stage of development the children are at when using blocks. Our blocks are different shapes and sizes.

The Seven Stages of Block Play

Stage 1: The blocks are carried around but not used for building.

 

Stage 2: Blocks are placed on the floor horizontally or vertically (stacking).

 

 

Stage 3: Blocks are used to bridge the space between other blocks.

 

 

 

Stage 4: Blocks are used to enclose a space.

Stage 5: Complex structure: blocks are placed in patterns or symmetrically when building. Block accessories may be incorporated. Buildings are not generally named.

 

Stage 6: Block buildings are given names that relate to the function of the building.

Stage 7: Block buildings often reproduce actual structures known by the children. There is a strong impulse for dramatic play around the structure.

Blockplay is unique!

Blockplay is sustainable!

Blockplay is accessible!

Blockplay doesn’t require spoken language!

Do you have any blocks at home?

Remember you can share your building with us on Twitter @GlenwoodFC #Glenwoodlearningathome

Remote Learning – Let’s go on a number hunt!

There are numbers all around us!

Mrs McGrory went on a number hunt inside her house – look all the numbers she found.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which numbers can you see?

 

 

 

 

 

Can you find some numbers in your house?

Maybe you could go on a number hunt outside too…

Perhaps you could look for all the numbers in order?

Good hunting and don’t forget to Tweet  @GlenwoodFC  #Glenwoodlearningathome

Maths Walks

The sun was shining as we set off on our first walks this morning and we even spotted a semi-circle shaped moon in the sky! Our walks have different maths challenges…


 

 

 

 

Number Challenge

Have you ever spotted the numbers on lamp posts before?

I wonder what this number is for?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shape Challenge

Squares & Rectangles
Circles & Triangles
Circle & Rectangles
Rectangles
Triangles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Counting Challenge

The Orange Group setting off in the rain
Counting our collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pattern Challenge

Patterns can be found in all sorts of places…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Measure Challenge

The biggest puddle!
The shortest tree!
The tallest tree
This tree is 4 children in circumference!
Who has the longest and shortest sticks?

Maths Week Scotland is coming!

Maths Week Scotland is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits, joy and beauty of maths.

Each group will be going on a walk in the local community to investigate one area of maths together and we would like parents and carers to join us!

Please sign up with your child’s key worker if you can join us – the group timetable is here : Maths Week Walks

Watch out for more Maths Week Challenges to come!