Tag Archives: STEM

Remote Learning: Eco Schools

Responsible Robbie

As a nursery community, we are on a continuous journey to empower our children to improve their environmental awareness.  

There are lots of wonderful ideas that you can do as a family to learn more about the natural world and care for the environment, which supports STEM and literacy learning, as well as your child’s health and wellbeing.

RECYCLE

Introduce your children to the concept of sorting household rubbish for recycling into categories such as plastic, paper, metal and glass.  This is a fantastic opportunity to learn about different types of materials used for packaging, how they are made and how they can be reused.  

National Geographic have a great online game to do a recycle round-up and clean up the park: https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/games/action-and-adventure/recycle-roundup-new/

RE-USE

Instead of throwing things away, encourage your child to think of great ways to reuse items.  Egg cartons work really well for growing herbs, glass jars are perfect for storing loose parts for play, and tin cans make really good pen and pencil holders.

COMPOST

Composting helps to teach our children about reducing the waste that heads to landfills by converting it into nutrient-rich soil.

There are lots of free and easy ways for your family to start composting.  

Use a recycled plastic drinks bottle – https://www.changeworks.org.uk/sites/default/files/Make_compost_in_a_bottle.pdf 

Recycle some wooden pallets – https://www.rspb.org.uk/get-involved/activities/give-nature-a-home-in-your-garden/garden-activities/startcomposting/

You could also simply create a compost trench in your garden or use an old bin or container – https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/Kindergarden/kidscompost/CompostingForKids.pdf

So what should you put in?

Greens – these are things that rot quickly, and provide important nitrogen and moisture

  • Tea bags
  • Grass cuttings
  • Vegetable peelings, salad leaves and fruit scraps
  • Coffee grounds
  • Old flowers and nettles

Browns – these are things that rot more slowly.  They provide carbon and fibre and also allow air pockets to form

  • Cardboard
  • Egg boxes
  • Paper
  • Leaves
  • Twigs and branches
  • Sawdust
  • Egg shells

LITTER PICK

Visit a local park and spend some time cleaning up the litter.  You will not only be protecting the wildlife and caring for the world around you but you will also be helping your community.  It will hopefully inspire others to join in too.  Count how many bits of rubbish you find – you will be amazed!  Don’t forget to wear protective gloves and take a rubbish bag.     

GARDEN SAFARI

You don’t have to go far to encounter some amazing living things.  Going on a back garden safari in your own garden or to a local park or woods will be a real voyage of discovery.  It is such a fun way to explore and learn about local plants, animals and minibeasts.  You can simply sit and watch, take photos or a video, do a scavenger checklist or record what you found by drawing a picture.

There is lots of information on the WWF to help you get started – https://www.wwf.org.uk/learn/love-nature/garden-safari

GROWING FRUIT AND VEGETABLES

Getting your child involved in growing fruit and vegetables is a great way for them to learn where their food comes from and make healthy eating choices.  Children can see first hand the growing cycle and develop an awareness of the seasonal nature of food.

Try growing indoors whilst the weather is still cold.  Tomatoes, carrots, peppers and beans work well on a nice sunny windowsill using a recycled container that allows drainage.

https://kidsgardening.org/gardening-basics-indoor-gardening/

Spring is coming soon and the perfect time to start growing outdoors if you have the opportunity.  You can plant in tubs, make a raised bed or create a garden growing patch.  

Fruits and vegetables that are easy to grow and mature quickly are strawberries, lettuce, peas, radishes, and courgettes.       

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/easy-crops-kids-grow

We would love if you could share your learning from home with us so we can use it as part of our action plan, either via Google Classroom or Twitter @GlenwoodFC #Glenwoodlearningfromhome  

Remote Learning – Catapults and Mazes

Mrs Silvester has been having fun with her recycling again! Here are some ideas of things you could try at home too…

Catapults

In Mrs Silvester’s house we set out to build our own catapults with things we had around the house to see if we could create our own trajectory devices. Then we built a basketball type game with the catapults.

Here are some of the things you could use:

  • Piece of scrap wood/ cardboard/ice lollipop stick/craft stick
  • Wood glue/rubber bands/sticky tack
  • Clothes peg/plastic spoons
  • Plastic bottle caps
  • Cardboard box
  • Yogurt pots/containers
  • Projectile Ideas (safe for toddlers and preschoolers): peas, pom poms, dandelions (just the flower part)

These were some of the questions the children in my house had, which we were hoping the experiment would answer:

  • Which would go further, heavier things or lighter things?
  • Does a longer catapult fling the object further?
  • Which catapult would work better, the spoon or the lollipop stick?
Here is our basketball game.

Find more information

https://www.scouts.org.uk/activities/lolly-stick-catapults/

Maze Game

This game was fun to make and is great for building motor skills, concentration, counting and number recognition. Turn a cardboard box or plate into an entertaining ball maze game.  This is a great hand-eye coordination game to make and play with reusable materials.

Suggestions of what you could use to make your own Recycled Maze Game:

  • Scissors
  • Cardboard Box or Plate
  • Pencil
  • Paper Strips or Cardboard Tubes (Toilet Paper Rolls, Paper towel rolls, wrapping paper tubes, etc.)
  • Sticky Tape or Glue
  • A bean, marble, scrunched up paper ball or something small that rolls.

Create the Maze

1) Design your maze by placing the tubes or paper strips on the box. Arrange them making sure you leave enough space for free ball travel around the maze.

2) Then attach the tubes or paper strips to your box or plate

3) ENJOY ! ! !

You could try these other ideas for making mazes too.

Here’s a fun song to help remind us of ways to cut down on single use plastic: https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p0798jzc/junk-rescue-songs-2-single-use-no-thank-you

Don’t forget to share your creations on Google Classrooms or Twitter @GlenwoodFC  #Glenwoodlearningathome

Remote Learning – Become a Scientist

Children are naturally scientists – their curiosity helps them to understand the world around them. The children at Glenwood love to do their own experiments – developing their skills of scientific inquiry and creativity as they work.

They ask questions and make predictions, follow instructions and make observations, developing skills for learning, life and work.

Here are a few simple experiments and investigations you can try at home…

Click on the link to find out how to Make a Bubble Snake 

Here is a reminder of the bubble mix recipe:

1/2 cup of washing up liquid, 1 1/2 cups water & 2 teaspoons of sugar

You could use straws or other tubes to blow bubbles (or anything else with holes…)

Make a Paper Aeroplane (follow the link for instructions)

Which is the best design for flying fast?

Which goes the furthest?

Why don’t you have a competition with your whole family?

Create a Volcanic Eruption

This is a favourite at Glenwood – it can get messy so you might like to do it outside!

First make your volcano – you could use an empty plastic bottle or yoghurt pot and some sand or mud.

Next put some bicarbonate of soda in the volcano (along with some ketchup or food colouring  or paint to make the lava red)

Finally pour in some vinegar and watch the eruption!

Lego Boat Challenge

Can you make a boat that floats using Lego?

 

 

 

How many pennies can it hold before it sinks?

 

 

Another challenge for the whole family to get involved with!

Build a Bug Hotel

You could create a home for minibeasts in your garden – it can be big and fancy like the one on the RSPB website but a simple one using recycled materials will also attract wildlife.

Don’t forget there are some other science experiments  in your Ideas for Home Booklet March 2020

Please Tweet some photos @GlenwoodFC  #Glenwoodlearningathome

 

STEM curriculum evening

Thank you to all the parents who attended our recent STEM curriculum evening and to the whole staff team for showcasing our learning and making this evening a huge success. Our parents loved trying out some of the experiences on offer and feedback was very positive and encouraging.

Great to see all the stimulating and fun activities and nice to talk with staff and parents.

So lovely to see the amazing resources and have a chance to meet other staff members – really lovely group.

Thank you for all the staff’s knowledge and expertise!

The resources were fantastic, in particular the technology.

Loved the ideas for playing and learning at home and seeing what children do at nursery.

I wish I could provide constructive feedback, but nope! The evening and it’s content was perfect! So much effort made! Such a shame more parents didn’t come along.

If you didn’t manage along, see what you missed here STEM in Glenwood presentation

Exploring the properties of gloop
Using our Chromebooks to make playdough
Mini-beast hunt
Architect sharing plans for our new centre
More explorations with cornflour and water to make gloop
Vinegar, red powder paint and bicarbonate of soda…..
…it’s a volcano!
Spaghetti constructions
Playdough fun
Gloop- solid or liquid?