Category: waiting

welcome to forms header

What is Microsoft Forms?

What is Microsoft Forms?

Microsoft Forms is a tool for creating surveys and quizzes

  • Microsoft Forms allows users the ability to create surveys and self marking quizzes.
  • Forms can be shared with Glow users and externally with parents and the community.
  • Forms automatically collates data which is displayed in interactive graphs.
  • All this data can then be exported into Excel for further analysis.

Creating new forms, and adding headers and media

Adding questions and sections to your form

Creating quizzes

Sharing forms, settings and accessibility features

Managing your forms

Using the file upload feature in forms

This is Digital Learning and Teaching II professional learning programme

As educators it is our responsibility to make effective use of digital technology to deliver high quality teaching, engaging learning and effective assessment.

This four-part professional learning programme is designed to enhance educators’ knowledge and skills in order to develop their learning, teaching and assessment with digital technology.

The four sessions are:

  • 25/01/22 planning
  • 01/02/22 teaching
  • 01/03/22 learning
  • 08/03/22 assessment and feedback

SOLD OUT

This is Digital Learning and Teaching professional learning programme

As educators it is our responsibility to make effective use of digital technology to deliver high quality teaching, engaging learning and effective assessment.

This four-part professional learning programme is designed to enhance educators’ knowledge and skills in order to develop their learning, teaching and assessment with digital technology.

The four sessions are:

  • 02/11/21 planning
  • 09/11/21 teaching
  • 16/11/21 learning
  • 23/11/21 assessment and feedback

SIGN UP TODAY

Using QR codes and ‘Thinglink’ for homework and resources – Early Years

Williamsburgh Primary School Using QR codes and ‘ThingLink’ for homework and resources, to encourage children to lead their learning, develop digital literacy skills, and overcome written communication barriers Aileen Mackey Early Learning and Childcare Officer gw17mackeyaileen@glow.sch.uk  Twitter @mackey_aileen

 

Click on link 👇

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/13wxuGHMd7e8vKcj7ytVJmJv82gEXiPewyt3FX2Uwj8U/edit?usp=sharing

 

 

Create – the Cyber Resilience Internet Safety Teacher Toolkit

Our aim

This page aims to provide clear and concise information about popular platforms where children and young people create online content. It is intended to provide knowledge and understanding for educators, so that they are more confident planning, delivering and assessing cyber resilience and internet safety learning.

How to use this page

For children and young people, the internet is an important part of their daily lives and educators need to understand the role of online devices and platforms in their lives. The internet is part of their cultural capital and key to engaging them with meaningful and relevant learning contexts.

  • Ask them about their online activities and behaviours – what do they create?
  • Let them lead the learning – can they teach you something?
  • Engage with their ideas and answers – how can you use their knowledge and experiences to inform their learning?

Consume – Reading

More and more of the information we read is read online. Social media and web pages have replaced newspapers, and even TV, for many of us and our learners. 
It is important to be critical of everything we read, whether it is online or not. Information can be misleading and we should support our learners to understand, analyse and evaluate all that they consume.

This could be explored through Literacy and English LIT x-18a – Recognise the difference between fact and opinion and progressing to evaluative comments about relevance reliability and credibility with appropriate justification

The risks:

  • believing false reporting or ‘fake news’ – especially harmful if it relates to health or wellbeing
  • spreading misinformation – social media makes it easier to share a story to a large audience than ever before
  • going down a ‘rabbit hole’ of misinformation, where one piece leads to another, that can lead to extremist views and content

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • If they are accessing their information on social media, are they using filter settings in the security and privacy settings for the platform, such as NSFW (not suitable for work), to reduce the chances of inappropriate material
  • If they are accessing news or information through a web browser, does it have safe searching setup?
  • If content is harmful or malicious – do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Make them aware of the dangers of believing and sharing ‘fake news’ or deliberate misinformation – how could false medical information be harmful? Explain to them the benefits of using the NHS site for more accurate information, and the risks of ‘googling’ medical information
  • Teach them how to understand, analyse and evaluate information they read online. You may already be doing this with physical texts, such as books, but it is important to make the learning contextual.
  • Explore the motives for fake news and misinformation – are they kind? Who’s benefitting form it? Are they able to tell when words may be unkind when they aren’t obviously harmful?

Consume – Social Media

More and more of the information we read is read online. Social media and web pages have replaced newspapers, and even TV, for many of us and our learners. 
It is important to be critical of everything we read, whether it is online or not. Information can be misleading and we should support our learners to understand, analyse and evaluate all that they consume.

This could be explored through Literacy and English LIT x-18a – Recognise the difference between fact and opinion and progressing to evaluative comments about relevance reliability and credibility with appropriate justification

 

The risks:

  • believing false reporting or ‘fake news’ – especially harmful if it relates to health or wellbeing
  • spreading misinformation – social media makes it easier to share a story to a large audience than ever before
  • viewing inappropriate or harmful content
  • targeted advertising or influencer ‘promotions’ 
  • ‘rabbit holes’, ‘echo chambers’ and other behaviours linked to viewing linked posts that lead to other
  • viewing misrepresented or ‘photoshopped’ images that may impact on body image

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • Ensure they have a secure login, such as password or 2-factor authentication
  • Have they set up account recovery details in case their account is hacked
  • Explore their social media profile – what is public and private? Are they aware of any risks or benefits?
  • Make them aware of any potential risks, such as clicking links in posts and on web pages – these could lead to phishing or malware
  • If they are accessing their information on social media, there are usually filter settings in the security and privacy settings for the platform – these can be used to reduce the content from certain sources, sites or profiles
  • If content is harmful or malicious – do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Ensure that learners are aware of the risks of social media content – it could be offensive, harmful or bullying
  • Teach them how to understand, analyse and evaluate information they read online. You may already be doing this with physical texts, such as books, but it is important to make the learning contextual.
  • Explore the motives for social media content – who has created it and for what purpose?

Consume – Watching

Social media, Video on Demand (VoD, such YouTube and Netflix) and livestreaming are the most common sources of video viewing today.
It is important to be critical of everything we view, whether it is online or not. Information can be misleading and we should support our learners to understand, analyse and evaluate all that they consume.

This could be explored through Literacy and English LIT x-18a – Recognise the difference between fact and opinion and progressing to evaluative comments about relevance reliability and credibility with appropriate justification

 

The risks:

  • believing false reporting or ‘fake news’ – especially harmful if it relates to health or wellbeing
  • spreading misinformation – social media makes it easier to share a story to a large audience than ever before
  • viewing content may be age inappropriate or promoting harmful views and behaviour
  • livestreaming carries an increased risk as it is live and unedited, so may content content that was not planned, such as swearing

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • If they are accessing their information on social media or YouTube, are they using filter settings in the security and privacy settings for the platform, such as NSFW (not suitable for work), to reduce the chances of inappropriate material
  • If they are accessing news or information through a web browser, does it have safe searching setup?
  • If content is harmful or malicious – do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Make them aware of the dangers of believing and sharing ‘fake news’ or deliberate misinformation – how could false medical information be harmful? Explain to them the benefits of using the NHS site for more accurate information, and the risks of ‘googling’ medical information
  • Help them become smarter viewers, both in terms of analysing and evaluating what they watch, but also in terms of how they search for/follow recommendations for content – are recommendations appropriate and relevant to them?
  • Explore the motives for fake news and misinformation – are they kind? Who’s benefitting form it? Are they able to tell when words may be unkind when they aren’t obviously harmful?

Consume – Gaming

Gaming is one of the most popular past times in the world. The amount of money spent playing games is more than that spent on video-on-demand (VOD), such as Netflix, or music streaming like Spotify combined. There are many aspects to gaming beyond playing the games, including livestreaming, esports or gambling.

Modern online gaming requires an account, with profiles, direct messages (DMs) and livestreams similar to the features on social media
Learners should be aware of the risks of inappropriate content in games, the pressure to make purchases (lootboxes, FUT, skins), and the risks associated with playing multiplayer online games whether friends or strangers.

This could be explored through Literacy and English LIT x-18a – Recognise the difference between fact and opinion and progressing to evaluative comments about relevance reliability and credibility with appropriate justification

The risks:

  • pressurised into purchases by targeted advertising, influencer promotions, or in-app/in-game microtransactions
  • inappropriate content – in games or livestreams
  • receiving unwanted DMs

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • Ensure they have a secure login, such as password or 2-factor authentication
  • Have they set up account recovery details in case their account is hacked
  • Explore their gaming account profile – what is public and private? Are they aware of any risks or benefits?
  • Make them aware of any potential risks, such as clicking links in DMs that could lead to phishing or malware
  • If content is harmful or malicious in games, streams or DMs – do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Discuss the risk of playing inappropriate games or viewing streams
  • Ask them to explore and recommend smarter choices for more appropriate games – this could be class game reviews alongside book reviews
  • Look at how they can be kinder when playing cooperatively

Consume – Gambling

More and more of the money we spend is spent online or digitally and that includes gambling. Learners need to understand the benefits and risks of using digital money and online accounts to make purchases. Do they understand the amount of targeted advertising that they are exposed to? Are they aware of when a social media ‘influencer’ is being paid to promote products to them?

Online risks:

  • pressurised into spending by targeted advertising, influencer promotions, or in-app/in-game microtransactions – such as gambling offers and promotions on social media
  • not saving payment details on games consoles, devices or gambling apps can reduce the convenience of spending too much
  • cyber scams, such as phishing and ransomware, linked to gambling

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • Make them aware of any potential risks, such as clicking links in posts and on web pages – these could lead to phishing or malware
  • If they are accessing their information on social media, there are usually filter settings in the security and privacy settings for the platform – these can be used to reduce the content from certain sources, sites or profiles
  • If content is harmful or malicious do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Discuss with learners what gambling is and the risks it carries to wellbeing – an dhow to report a problem
  • Explore the safety features of online gambling – account settings, information literacy to better understand deals, offers and promotions
  • Investigate the need for support from friends and family to deal with gambling – would they report or support their friends or family?