Category: waiting

Consume – Gaming

Gaming is one of the most popular past times in the world. The amount of money spent playing games is more than that spent on video-on-demand (VOD), such as Netflix, or music streaming like Spotify combined. There are many aspects to gaming beyond playing the games, including livestreaming, esports or gambling.

Modern online gaming requires an account, with profiles, direct messages (DMs) and livestreams similar to the features on social media
Learners should be aware of the risks of inappropriate content in games, the pressure to make purchases (lootboxes, FUT, skins), and the risks associated with playing multiplayer online games whether friends or strangers.

This could be explored through Literacy and English LIT x-18a – Recognise the difference between fact and opinion and progressing to evaluative comments about relevance reliability and credibility with appropriate justification

The risks:

  • pressurised into purchases by targeted advertising, influencer promotions, or in-app/in-game microtransactions
  • inappropriate content – in games or livestreams
  • receiving unwanted DMs

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • Ensure they have a secure login, such as password or 2-factor authentication
  • Have they set up account recovery details in case their account is hacked
  • Explore their gaming account profile – what is public and private? Are they aware of any risks or benefits?
  • Make them aware of any potential risks, such as clicking links in DMs that could lead to phishing or malware
  • If content is harmful or malicious in games, streams or DMs – do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Discuss the risk of playing inappropriate games or viewing streams
  • Ask them to explore and recommend smarter choices for more appropriate games – this could be class game reviews alongside book reviews
  • Look at how they can be kinder when playing cooperatively

Consume – Gambling

More and more of the money we spend is spent online or digitally and that includes gambling. Learners need to understand the benefits and risks of using digital money and online accounts to make purchases. Do they understand the amount of targeted advertising that they are exposed to? Are they aware of when a social media ‘influencer’ is being paid to promote products to them?

Online risks:

  • pressurised into spending by targeted advertising, influencer promotions, or in-app/in-game microtransactions – such as gambling offers and promotions on social media
  • not saving payment details on games consoles, devices or gambling apps can reduce the convenience of spending too much
  • cyber scams, such as phishing and ransomware, linked to gambling

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • Make them aware of any potential risks, such as clicking links in posts and on web pages – these could lead to phishing or malware
  • If they are accessing their information on social media, there are usually filter settings in the security and privacy settings for the platform – these can be used to reduce the content from certain sources, sites or profiles
  • If content is harmful or malicious do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Discuss with learners what gambling is and the risks it carries to wellbeing – an dhow to report a problem
  • Explore the safety features of online gambling – account settings, information literacy to better understand deals, offers and promotions
  • Investigate the need for support from friends and family to deal with gambling – would they report or support their friends or family?

Consume – the Cyber Resilience Internet Safety Teacher Toolkit

Our aim

This page aims to provide clear and concise information about popular platforms where children and young people consume online content. It is intended to provide knowledge and understanding for educators, so that they are more confident planning, delivering and assessing cyber resilience and internet safety learning.

How to use this page

Children and young people do not see the internet as a separate thing from ‘real life’ and it is important to understand the role of online devices and platforms in their lives. The internet is part of their cultural capital and key to engaging them with meaningful and relevant learning contexts.

  • Ask them about their online activities and behaviours – what do they consume?
  • Let them lead the learning – can they teach you something?
  • Engage with their ideas and answers – how can you use their knowledge and experiences to inform their learning?

Once you know what they consume online, you can use find ideas, information and resources on this page to support your planning.

Consume – Searching

More and more of the information we read is read online. Social media and web pages have replaced newspapers, and even TV, for many of us and our learners. 
Learners will likely use apps, such as TikTok or YouTube, to find information rather than a traditional web browser. However, web browsers and search engine apps, such as Google, will usually have more safety and security features to make searching more accurate and more accurate or reliable search results will help learners avoid ‘fake news’ or malicious/harmful content.

This could be explored through Literacy and English LIT x-18a – Recognise the difference between fact and opinion and progressing to evaluative comments about relevance reliability and credibility with appropriate justification

The risks:

  • Learners may follow in-app or social media links which may be targeted advertising or a ‘rabbit hole’ of misinformation
  • Without appropriate search settings, learners may find inappropriate or harmful content
  • Learners are probably unaware that the first results returned in a web search are usually adverts linked to shopping sites, and feel pressured into making a purchase

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • Make them aware of any potential risks, such as unreliable webpages or targeted advertising
  • Explain the advantages of using a web browser to find information over social media apps – a search engine, such as Google, will allow users to use filter settings that reduce the risk
  • If search results are harmful or malicious do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Make them aware of the dangers of clicking the first results returned or searching without filters, like SafeSearch, enabled
  • Teach them how to use settings, advanced search or keyword parameters to increase the relevance of search results
  • Discuss how to understand, analyse and evaluate search results. You may already be doing this with physical texts, such as books, but it is important to make the learning contextual.

Sharing Safely in Glow

 

Glow has a range of tools which can be used independently or in collaboration with others. How ever you are using it, it is always good to have a regular check of your settings to ensure only those you intend and who require access have the permissions to view, edit or share documents, files, groups or sites with you. 

The bitesize videos below show how to review and share safely from a range of Microsoft products within Glow. These include:
  • Launchpads
  • Teams
  • OneDrive
  • Groups 
  • Sharepoint

The full length video can be viewed on our 365 Learning Pathway page or via our YouTube Sharing Safely Playlist.

 
 

 
 

Scottish Learning Festival 2021

We are delighted to announce the Scottish Learning Festival will take place from
Tuesday 21 until Thursday 23 September 2021.

SLF will be entirely virtual event this year, meaning you’ll be able to join us in a fantastic digital arena, through a range of live and recorded sessions. The full conference programme can be found here.

The Digilearn team will be presenting,or supporting, a range of sessions below:

 

Communicate – the Cyber Resilience Internet Safety Teacher Toolkit

Our aim

This page aims to provide clear and concise information about popular platforms where children and young people communicate online. It is intended to provide knowledge and understanding for educators, so that they are more confident planning, delivering and assessing cyber resilience and internet safety learning.

How to use this page

Children and young people do not see the internet as a separate thing from ‘real life’ and it is important to understand the role of online devices and platforms in their lives. The internet is part of their cultural capital and key to engaging them with meaningful and relevant learning contexts.

  • Ask them about their online activities and behaviours – what do they consume?
  • Let them lead the learning – can they teach you something?
  • Engage with their ideas and answers – how can you use their knowledge and experiences to inform their learning?

Once you know how they communicate online, you can use find ideas, information and resources on this page to support your planning.

Platforms

What is Microsoft Whiteboard?

Microsoft Whiteboard is an interactive tool which allows users to work independently or collaboratively.

  • Create your own content, share, collaborate and distribute activities or ideas to your learners or colleagues.
  • Whiteboard can be added to your Team or an existing O365 group.
  • Find out how you can make the most out of Microsoft Whiteboard Online within Glow or via the app by watching the videos below.

Using Core Whiteboard Tools

Creating and Sharing a Whiteboard

Incorporating a Whiteboard into a Microsoft team

 

welcome to teams header

What is Microsoft Teams?

Microsoft Teams is a Digital Hub for Collaboration.

  • Teams can be used for classroom content, to host a Professional Learning Community or simply to pull together information for members of a group.
  • Find out how you can make the most out of Microsoft Teams within Glow by watching the videos below.

Overview of Microsoft Teams within Glow

Accessing from your Glow Launchpad

Joining a Teams Meeting and Trouble Shooting Issues

Organising Breakout Rooms and Facilitators Before Meetings

Joining and creating a Team

Channels

Navigation Panel

Conversation Space and Meetings

Using Tabs

Files

Searching within Teams

Creating Assignments

Assignment Insights

Returned Assignments

Student View of Teams Assignments

Team settings in Glow

Troubleshooting a Teams Meeting

Upcoming O365 webinars

What is Microsoft Stream?

Microsoft Stream in Glow is a video sharing platform for learning and teaching.

  • Create your own content, share, collaborate and distribute work to your learners or colleagues.
  • Stream can be added to your Team or an existing O365 group.
  • Find out how you can make the most out of Microsoft Stream within Glow by watching the videos below.

What is Microsoft Stream?

An Introduction

What is Microsoft Stream?

Linking with your Microsoft Team

What is Microsoft Stream?
Home Page Features

What is Stream?
Content, Groups and Channels

What is Microsoft Stream?
Creating Videos within Stream

What is Stream?
Uploading Content

What is Microsoft Stream?
Linking with your Microsoft Team

What is Microsoft Stream?
Additional Addice and Support