Castle Douglas Primary and Early Learning and Childcare Centre

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Information Handling (inc. Data and Graphs)

Activity 1 – Tally Questions.

Focus – I can collect and sort data and present information in tallies, frequency tables and grouped frequency tables.

Resources – Household Items

Choose something around the home, garden or street where there are different kinds of things to count (e.g. insects, cars, toys, tins of food). Create a tally chart to record the number of each kind (e.g. beetles, spiders, woodlice).
Use this data to create some questions to challenge other family members e.g. How many more tins of beans are there than tins of tomatoes?

 

 

 

Activity 2 – Letter Tally

Focus – I can collect and sort data and present information in tallies, frequency tables and grouped frequency tables.

Resources – Book or Newspaper

Choose any 5 letters. Open a book or newspaper randomly and record how many times each of your letters occurs in the first two sentences. Repeat, tallying the appearance of the same five letters on another page. Is the same letter most common each time? What else do you notice? – discuss together.

 

 

 

 

Activity 3 – Coin Toss

Focus – I can display information in pictograms, bar and bar line graphs and understand the impact of scale on these.

Resources – Paper, pen, coin.

Toss a coin 50 or more times and record whether its heads or tails each time. Display the data on a graph, complete with title and labelled axes. 

 

 

 

 

Activity 4 – Why is it Important?

Focus – I can display information in pictograms, bar and bar line graphs and understand the impact of scale on these.

Resources – media sources (e.g. newspapers, magazines, TV, internet)

Find examples of pictograms, bar graphs and bar line graphs in different media sources (e.g. TV, internet, newspapers, magazines) and discuss what information they give to the reader.

 

 

 

Activity 5 – When Was it Said?

Focus – I can talk about how likely something is to happen and can order events on a simple probability scale.

Resources – pencil, paper and Media sources (e.g. newspapers, magazines, TV, internet).

Work together to record five examples relating to probability or chance from the media (e.g. TV, internet, newspapers, magazines) e.g. How likely it will snow on Christmas Day in Castle Douglas, what the outcome of a Parliamentary vote may be, etc.

 

 

 

Activity 6 – Product Numbers.

Focus – I have explored and designed questionnaires to help me answer questions and solve problems.

Resources – pencil and paper

Invent a product such as ‘Magic Shine’ shampoo. Make up some number facts about it that show it is very popular/not at all popular (e.g. 50 out of 139 people said they use this shampoo). Discuss with your family and also look for evidence in adverts in real-life.

 

 

 

Activity 8 – Pies All Around.

Focus – I can interpret information presented in a pie chart..

Resources – pencil, paper and household items.

Sort items at home e.g. your toys, the tins in the cupboard, cutlery in the kitchen drawer, etc into categories and record the numbers of each. Show this information in a pie chart. It need not be very accurate.

 

 

 

 

Activity 9 – My Day in a Pie

Focus – I can interpret information presented in a pie chart..

Resources – pencil and paper

Estimate how long you spend doing different activities on a typical Saturday and show this information in a pie chart. It need not be very accurate.

 

 

Activity 10 – Continuous Data.

Focus – I can interpret and create line graphs.

Resources – pencil and paper

Sketch a line graph to show something around the home that changes over time (e.g. height of a sunflower, volume of water lost from a dripping tap, temperature in a sunny room).

 

 

Activity 11 – What Are the Chances?

Focus – I can explore the probability of an event and can represent this numerically.

Resources – pencil and paper

Work with another family members or friend and each person imagine you have been asked to create new flavours of chocolates for a new chocolate box. Decide and describe how many of each flavour or type of chocolate will go in the box. Write three questions about the probability of randomly picking certain chocolates. Swap information about your boxes and answer each other’s questions.

 

 

Activity 12 – Average Words?

Focus – I have explored a variety of ways to find the average of a set of data.

Resources – Pencil, paper, book, newspaper or advertisement, calculator (optional).

Choose a page in a book, a column in a newspaper or an advertising leaflet. Count and record the number of words in each sentence, then calculate the mean, median and mode. Try this with several sources.

 

Need help with the difference between mean, median and mode – click on this link.

 

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