Diagnosis

If you think you or your child may have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you might want to consider speaking to your GP about it.

If you’re worried about your child, it may help to speak to their teachers, before seeing your GP, to find out if they have any concerns about your child’s behaviour.

Your GP cannot formally diagnose ADHD, but they can discuss your concerns with you and refer you for a specialist assessment, if necessary.

When you see your GP, they may ask you:

  • about your symptoms or those of your child
  • when these symptoms started
  • where the symptoms occur – for example, at home or in school
  • whether the symptoms affect your or your child’s day-to-day life – for example, if they make socialising difficult
  • if there have been any recent significant events in your or your child’s life, such as a death or divorce in the family
  • if there’s a family history of ADHD
  • about any other problems or symptoms of different health conditions you or your child may have

Next steps

If your GP thinks your child may have ADHD, they may first suggest a period of “watchful waiting” – lasting around 10 weeks – to see if your child’s symptoms improve, stay the same or get worse.

They may also suggest starting a group-based, ADHD-focused parent training or education programme. Being offered a parent training and education programme does not mean you have been a bad parent – it aims to teach you ways of helping yourself and your child.

See treating ADHD for more information.

If your child’s behaviour does not improve, and both you and your GP believe it’s affecting their day-to-day life, your GP should refer you and your child to a specialist for a formal assessment.

Assessment

There are a number of different specialists you or your child may be referred to for a formal assessment, including:

  • a child or adult psychiatrist
  • a paediatrician – a specialist in children’s health
  • a learning disability specialist, social worker or occupational therapist with expertise in ADHD

Who you’re referred to depends on your age and what’s available in your local area.

There’s no simple test to determine whether you or your child has ADHD, but your specialist can make an accurate diagnosis after a detailed assessment. The assessment may include:

  • a physical examination, which can help rule out other possible causes for the symptoms
  • a series of interviews with you or your child
  • interviews or reports from other significant people, such as partners, parents and teachers

The criteria for making a diagnosis of ADHD in children &  teenagers are outlined below.

Diagnosis in children and teenagers

Diagnosing ADHD in children depends on a set of strict criteria. To be diagnosed with ADHD, your child must have 6 or more symptoms of inattentiveness, or 6 or more symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

Read more about the symptoms of ADHD.

To be diagnosed with ADHD, your child must also have:

  • been displaying symptoms continuously for at least 6 months
  • started to show symptoms before the age of 12
  • been showing symptoms in at least 2 different settings – for example, at home and at school, to rule out the possibility that the behaviour is just a reaction to certain teachers or to parental control
  • symptoms that make their lives considerably more difficult on a social, academic or occupational level
  • symptoms that are not just part of a developmental disorder or difficult phase, and are not better accounted for by another condition

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