Scranalogue

Culture Heritage Learning

Blogging Bootcamp #2

September 1, 2015 by Scran | 1 Comment

Scran is limbering up for Blogging Bootcamp #2 on Glow this afternoon.  jackies2_09309212

We’ve even got our favourite sturdy pair of Doctor Martens from 1994 ready for the occasion. The Scran staff hope to learn a bit more about blogging – as well as sharing information about Scran, copyright, digital assets and our schools outreach work.

If you are taken by our lovely green Docs and fancy more fashionable footwear, why not browse through historical and contemporary shoe designs here.

Image © Victoria & Albert MuseumPair of Dr Martens bootsLicensor www.scran.ac.uk

Out & About with Scran

August 31, 2015 by Scran | 2 Comments

Are you planning to visit a local historic property? If so, you may be interested to know that we have a whole host of new Pathfinders on Scran, investigating Historic Scotland properties.  They are bursting with fabulous maps, photographs, film footage, reconstruction drawings, aerial views as well as information for teachers, attached in PDF format.imgzoom-image-0757-07570012

From Arbroath to Urquhart, many of these informative guides are also available in Gaelic, for use in the classroom or on site during a school visit.

So, if you are studying a particular castle, abbey or historic site in Scotland, these resources are a must.

Image © National Library of Scotland, Plan of St Andrews, c. 1580. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk

Kite Aerial Photography

August 25, 2015 by Scran | 3 Comments

Recently we’ve been getting to grips with the kite aerial photography kits provided by Dr. John Wells of the Scottish National Aerial Photography Scheme (SNAPS). As you can see we visited Tantallon Castle for a practice flight. We were quite pleased with our results & the potential for learning.

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We are planning on piloting this activity with schools over 2015/16, so if you are interested please contact us & lets’s go fly a kite! 

We believe exploring the aerial photography collections on Scran, in combination with the active learning involved in kite aerial photography, could lead to all sorts of creative learning.

For example, studying aerial photography can support the following Curriculum for Excellence experiences & outcomes within Social Studies.

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  • describe the major characteristic features of Scotland’s landscape and explain how these were formed (SOC 2-07a)
  • discuss the environmental impact of human activity (SOC 2-08a)
  • explain how the physical environment influences the ways in which people use land by comparing the local area with a contrasting area (SOC 2-13a)
  • use knowledge of a historical period to interpret the evidence and present an informed view (SOC 3-01a)
  • compare settlement and economic activity in two contrasting landscapes (SOC 3-13a)
  • explain the impact of processes which form and shape landscapes on selected landscapes in Scotland, Europe and beyond (SOC 3-07a)
  • evaluate the changes which have taken place in an industry and debate their impact (SOC 4-05b)
  • discuss the sustainability of key natural resources (SOC 4-08a)

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    Salisbury Crags Holyrood Park

  • assess the impact of developments in transport infrastructure in a selected area (SOC 4-09b)
  • describe and assess the impact of human activity on an area (SOC 4-10a)
  • explain the development of the main features of an urban area and evaluate the implications for the society involved (SOC 4-10b)

Welcome

August 21, 2015 by Scran | 0 comments

Hot off the press, the Scranalogue has arrived. We are delighted to share what’s happening at Scran via our brand new blog. Keep up to date with new content arriving in our many collections, for example we’ve some great new oral histories about Falkirk during World War One.

See what we’re up to in the field trialling Kite Aerial Photography thanks to Scottish National Aerial Photography Scheme, SNAPS

Meet us in person, we’ll be busy exhibiting and supporting events throughout autumn 2015, starting with the Scottish Learning Festival quickly followed by Doors Open Day in Edinburgh.

Image © Scottish Maritime Museum. Wireless News from SS Athenia, 1933. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk

Aerial Photography

August 20, 2015 by Scran | 0 comments

On Scran there is a staggering amount of aerial imagery to explore & have fun with. Aerial photographs are simply pictures taken from above. There are two types of aerial photograph – vertical and oblique.jackies2_00996809

Vertical aerial photographs are taken with a camera directed straight down towards the ground, as vertically as possible, at a right angle or 90 degrees. They are usually taken from immediately overhead with a camera fixed to the underside of an aeroplane. Such vertical aerial photographs are often easy to compare with maps and can help develop mapping skills.

Oblique aerial photographs are taken at angles less than 90 degrees to the ground and are usually taken by a photographer through the window of an aeroplane. This oblique perspective allows us to see more familiar view of the landscape, where details of urban and rural land-use become obvious.

Landscapes, buildings & architecture and our whole environment and history can be appreciated in new ways by examining aerial photographs. For example, have a look at these very different aerial pictures of Clachnaharry, near Inverness.

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However, you don’t need an aeroplane to take aerial photos, another option is Kite Aerial Photography, which is a great outdoor learning experience. Aerial photographs can be used to illustrate various aspects of the curriculum, including Learning for Sustainability themes. Perfect for studying geography; aerial imagery can help answer questions about coastal activity, population density, economic activity, glaciers, commercial development, tourism and climate. Not to mention visual arts, archaeology, geology and various interdisciplinary approaches.

We hope you are able take the time to look at Scotland from a bird’s eye view on Scran.

Images © NCAP & RCAHMS. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk

Winners

July 27, 2015 by Scran | 0 comments

jackies2_3689_25471_005-000-012-729-R_2015-04-21_11-01-31Our photography competition attracted a lot of entries, and the judges deliberated long and hard over the outcome. The theme was What Scotland Means to Me, and we received a variety of interpretations, from images of Munros and monuments to the odd bottle of Irn Bru.

The overall winner, was Rona Stewart’s picture of three rams looking through a fence. The judges said “Rona’s photo is a fantastic composition. It’s sharp, beautifully-framed and captures her Highland heritage.kingussieRona won an iPad for herself and 10 iPads for Kingussie High School, where she is currently studying. She was presented with her prize at an assembly on a sunny morning in Kingussie. She is pictured here with Head of Art & Design, David Douglas, and Andrew James of Scran.

We also travelled to Dunbarney Primary School near Perth to present Angus Johnston with his prize. Judges commented on his picture, of two boys jumping into Portsoy harbour, jackies2_3689_25469_005-000-012-728-R_2015-04-21_10-52-38

“…it captures a picture of enjoyment and also it is filled with light just waiting for a photographer to come along and capture the inspiring photo.” Angus is pictured receiving  his prize from Jackie Sangster.winner

 

Isobel Mair School for children with additional support needs was the winner in its category. The winning image, of a path leading through a Scottish forest, was selected by the judges for its sense of “calmness” and a feeling that “you could really be there in the photograph.” The picture was a joint effort, taken by pupils from the school’s Tiree class, and the class was presented with their prizes by Neil Fraser.

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photo2Images © Rona Stewart, Angus Johnston & Isobel Mair School. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk

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