Category: CRIS

Safer Internet Day 2024

Safer Internet Day 2024 will take place on the 6th of February 2024, with celebrations and learning based around the theme ‘Inspiring change? Making a difference, managing influence and navigating change online’.

Safer Internet Day is held every February all around the world. Last year, over 170 different countries celebrated the day! Safer Internet Day is a chance to think about any worries we might have about using technology and the internet, but it’s also about celebrating all the fantastic things technology can help us with.

Safer Internet Day is the UK’s biggest celebration of online safety.

Created in consultation with young people across the UK, this year Safer Internet Day will be focusing on change online, this includes covering:

  • Young people’s perspective on new and emerging technology
  • Using the internet to make change for the better
  • The changes young people want to see online
  • The things that can influence and change the way young people think, feel and act online and offline

Coordinated in the UK by the UK Safer Internet Centre, the celebration sees thousands of organisations get involved to promote the safe, responsible and positive use of digital technology for children and young people.

Visit UK Safer Internet Centre or browse the links below to become involved!

Education Resources   (suitable for early level to senior phase)

Supporters Registration

Films

Get involved on social media

Parents and carers

Supporters Map

Bongles Text image

Introducing The Bongles and the Crafty Crows – Exploring early level Cyber!

The Digital Team and the Bongles have joined forces in partnership with Cyber Scotland, Cyber Aware and the Scottish Book Trust to introduce younger learners to develop understanding of cyber awareness at early level, through the publication of the new Bongles book ‘The Bongles and the Crafty Crows‘.

Who are the Bongles?

The Bongles are a group of monster friends who live on a paradise-like planet.

They reuse and repurpose items that wash up onto their planet’s pristine shore and turn trash into treasure.

The rhyming stories are full of slapstick and silly humour, which both children and adults alike will find funny. The quirky and whimsical watercolour illustrations are sure to capture the attention of young readers.

The Bongles and The Crafty Crows – The newest book in the series helps children to learn about cyber resilience in a fun-filled way.

Story Summary

Three wooden crates wash up onto the shores of Bongle Island.

The Bongles really want to keep this new found treasure safe from the crafty crows.

Will the crows outsmart the Bongles’ padlocks and passcodes?

Will the crows take the crates full of treasure and keep it all for themselves?

The Bongles and the Crafty Crows‘ story book will be part of the P1 Bookbug bags for every primary one.

There is also a variety of practitioner-created learning and teaching resources to accompany the story, a downloadable PDF of the book and an animation on the Bongles website.

You will also engage with this story in the new 3-part series of early level Cyber Resilience and Internet Safety webinars, This is early level Digital – CRIS and through various cyber events throughout the year, which will be advertised here, on the blog.

Join us in the upcoming introduction webinar and read along to find out more!

Upcoming Events

 

early/first level read along with The Bongles & the Crafty Crows #CSW24

living in a digital world

Living in a Digital World: cyber resource

YouTube player

Experience an interactive journey into the world of cybersecurity. This resource shines a light on some of the most important topics for how to stay safe inside the digital world and gives practical suggestions that help improve cyber resilience. Designed and developed in collaboration with Daydream Believers and Education Scotland

Use this link to go to Daydream Believer’s site and download the resources: go to Daydream

cris programme header

This is early level Digital – CRIS

(Cyber Resilience and Internet Safety).

When we use the internet we either consume, create or communicate. Each of these behaviours has different levels and types of risk. Join us in this series of three webinars to explore how we can support early level learners to gain knowledge and confidence in Cyber Resilience and Internet Safety. This webinar series is for all ELC practitioners working with early level learners across a variety of settings in Scotland.

The sessions will include examples from practice, centered around the Curriculum for Excellence early level Digital Literacy CRIS Experiences and Outcome,

I can explore, play and communicate using digital technologies safely and securely. TCH 0-03

illustrating what invitations to explore, play and communicate safely and securely may look like across a variety of ELC settings. 

We will also refer to National self-evaluation framework for ELC, How Good is Our Early Learning and Childcare Quality Indictor 2.1 Safeguarding and Child Protection.

We welcome you to familiarise yourself with Curriculum for Excellence early level Digital Literacy Experiences and Outcomes prior to joining us. 

Each session is accompanied by optional follow up reading/professional development centred on the Cyber Toolkit, coordinating with each session.

Attendees will be invited to submit a short blog post illustrating how the programme has impacted practice,

The examples of practice included in the session content will be ELC focused, however this session is for all practitioners working at early level across a variety of settings. 

Glow login NOT required. 

Each session will be repeated three times throughout the year 23/24 with morning and twilight options.

To get the most from this course, it is advised that you join the sessions in numerical order.

Session 1 (60 minutes) This is early level Digital, CRIS – Consume 7.9.23 & 9.1.24 & 16.4.24

Session 2 (30 minutes) This is early level Digital, CRIS – Create 3.10.23 & 20.2.24 & 30.4.24

Session 3 (30 minutes) This is early level Digital, CRIS – Communicate 7.11.23 & 12.3.24 & 14.5.23

cyber security for ELC

Cyber security advice and guidance for Early Learning and Childcare providers.

All ELC providers want to create a safe and secure environment for the children in your care. As we become ever more reliant on digital technology it is increasingly important that you protect data (on children, staff and families), finances and also the integrity of any digital systems you use, including email, communication channels and databases.

There are a handful of steps you can take to minimise the potentially costly and disruptive effect of a cyber incident, and better safeguard the children in your care, as well as your business’s finances and reputation. This short seminar is for anyone working in childcare in Scotland. It is run by the National Cyber Security Centre (www.ncsc.gov.uk), and supported by the Scottish Government, Education Scotland and Care Inspectorate, as part of CyberScotland Week. It will provide you with advice and steps you can take to minimise the likelihood and impact of a cyber attack on your setting, and information about where to get help and advice if you need it.

Please click here to download e-pamphlet PDF Early Years practitioners: using cyber security to protect your settings. 

cyber toolkit unwanted contact

Communicate: unwanted contact

Unwelcome friend/follow requests or messages (20%) and unwanted sexual messages (8%) account for 28% of the potential risks encountered by UK internet users aged 13+ (Ofcom, 2022). Understanding how the platform works can help children and young people reduce the likelihood of this potential risk by managing who can and cannot contact them.

 

back to Communicate

cyber toolkit communicate

Internet safety risks and considerations

Access

In order to communicate with others online, learners usually need access to:

  • an internet-enabled device
  • apps to communicate – this may include the device’s own messaging, calls or video calls (FaceTime) apps, as well as the most common additional messaging apps WhatsApp and Snapchat
  • someone else to communicate with

When supporting learners with this area, it is important to consider who controls their access to these opportunities and resources:

  • Is there a risk of this occurring in school?
  • How is that enabled?
  • Are there steps that could be taken to reduce the risk of this?

If it is an out-of-school risk:

  • How can the school support with this?
  • Is support required for families or learners?
  • Who can support with this: Community Learning and Development or Police Scotland?
Potential risks

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

Topics to explore with learners might include are:

  • the people they communicate with – groups or individually
  • the platforms they communicate on – impact of device or context
  • types of content they might share – risk of inappropriate content
  • the risks of sharing created content
  • the law about online communications – Communications Act 2003
  • the potential risks, and associated harms, the same for everyone – why are they different, and why does this matter?

Cyber resilience guidance

Devices

The first potential vulnerability when communicating online is the device not being securely setup.

Check with learners that they have taken these steps to reduce the risk of someone accessing and communicating with their device without permission:

  • a screenlock that requires a passcode or biometric (face or fingerprint) to log in to stop unauthorised access (hacking)
  • apple devices have a content filter, called communication safety in Messages, in their ‘screen time’ settings that blocks potentially nude content from children’s phones
Accounts

Another potential vulnerability when communicating online is that accounts on the device or online platform not being secure enough and allowing others to use their device or contact them.

Check with learners that they have taken these steps on their apps to reduce the risk unwanted contact:

  • they use device or platform security features, inlcuding password, biometrics or 2FA to ensure only they can access it
  • they know how to use the settings and security features to set the platform up to only share information they are willing to share – this can reduce their ‘visibility’ and potentially reduce the chances of unwanted contact
  • they can use the settings and security settings to control who is able to contact them, see/reply to their posts or direct message them on the platform

 

Whatsapp 
Safety and security features

How to block and report contacts

How to change group privacy settings

How to change your privacy settings

Snapchat

How To Report A Snap

Snapchat Reporting Quick Guide

Reporting on Snapchat – Safety Snapshot video

How do I change my privacy settings on Snapchat?

How to Remove a Friend

FaceTime

Block unwanted callers in FaceTime on iPhone

Report and support

When using devices or online platforms to create communicate, learners should understand that online platforms and services, including apps, carry greater risk of being shared without permission as the messages and content on these is almost always stored on their server, which is the company’s computer, and not the child or young person’s device. 

Should created content ever be shared with, or without, permission then learners should have the knowledge, skills and support to report and recover from the potential risks associated with this:

ANY communication that contains content that depicts child sexual abuse MUST be reported to the police or CEOP

Whatsapp 
How to block and report contacts

Snapchat

How To Report A Snap
Snapchat Reporting Quick Guide

Reporting on Snapchat – Safety Snapshot video

FaceTime

Block unwanted callers in FaceTime on iPhone

Adults can report concerns about unwanted contact to NSPCC

Children and young people can report concerns about unwanted contact to Childline

cyber toolkit trolling bullying abusive behaviour

Communicate: trolling, bullying and abusive behaviour

Trolling (15%) and bullying, abusive behaviour or threats (8%) account for 23% of the potential risks encountered by UK internet users aged 13+ (Ofcom, 2022). Understanding how the platform works can help children and young people reduce the likelihood of this potential risk by managing whose messages and posts they see, and how to mute or block people who may be trolling, bullying or abusing them.

back to Communicate

cyber toolkit communicate

“It is important not to get too hung up on the fact that your child has experienced bullying online, but to recognise that they have been bullied and need the same support as they would if they had experienced any other type of bullying. Take their concerns seriously, remain calm, and consider what they would like to happen.” Respect Me

 

This guidance aims to support teachers educate learners about the control they have over devices and accounts and how this knowledge can reduce contact, block unwanted communication or report abusive behaviour. 

Internet safety risks and considerations

Access

In order to communicate with others online, learners usually need access to:

  • an internet-enabled device
  • apps to communicate – this may include the device’s own messaging, calls or video calls (FaceTime) apps, as well as the most common additional messaging apps WhatsApp and Snapchat
  • someone else to communicate with

When supporting learners with this area, it is important to consider who controls their access to these opportunities and resources:

  • Is there a risk of this occurring in school?
  • How is that enabled?
  • Are there steps that could be taken to reduce the risk of this?

If it is an out-of-school risk:

  • How can the school support with this?
  • Is support required for families or learners?
  • Who can support with this: Community Learning and Development or Police Scotland?
Potential risks

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

Topics to explore with learners might include are:

  • the people they communicate with – groups or individually
  • the platforms they communicate on – impact of device or context
  • types of content they might share – risk of inappropriate content
  • the risks of sharing created content
  • the law about online communications – Communications Act 2003
  • the potential risks, and associated harms, the same for everyone – why are they different, and why does this matter?

Cyber resilience guidance

Devices

The first potential vulnerability when communicating online is the device not being securely setup.

Check with learners that they have taken these steps to reduce the risk of someone accessing and communicating with their device without permission:

  • screenlock that requires a passcode or biometric (face or fingerprint) to log in to stop unauthorised access (hacking)
  • apple devices have a content filter, called communication safety in Messages, in their ‘screen time’ settings that blocks potentially nude content from children’s phones
Accounts

Another potential vulnerability when communicating online is the accounts on the device or online platform not being secure enough and allowing others to use their device or contact them.

Check with learners that they have taken these steps on their apps to reduce the risk unwanted contact:

  • they use device or platform security features, inlcuding password, biometrics or 2FA to ensure only they can access it
  • they know how to use the settings and security features to set the platform up to only share information they are willing to share – this can reduce their ‘visibility’ and potentially reduce the chances of unwanted contact
  • they can use the settings and security settings to control who is able to contact them, see/reply to their posts or direct message them on the platform

 

Whatsapp 

How to block and report contacts

Snapchat

How do I change my privacy settings on Snapchat?

How to Remove a Friend

FaceTime

Block unwanted callers in FaceTime on iPhone

Report and support

When using devices or online platforms to communicate, learners should understand that online platforms and services, including apps, carry greater risk of being shared without permission as the messages and content on these is almost always stored on their server, which is the company’s computer, and not the child or young person’s device.

Should created content ever be shared with, or without, permission then learners should have the knowledge, skills and support to report and recover from the potential risks associated with this:

ANY communication that contains content that depicts child sexual abuse MUST be reported to the police or CEOP

 
 

Whatsapp
How to block and report contacts

 

Snapchat

How To Report A Snap

Snapchat Reporting Quick Guide
 

Adults can report concerns about unwanted contact to NSPCC

Children and young people can report concerns about unwanted contact to Childline