All posts by Miss McDowall

Japanese Cooking – any allergies?

Next Tuesday, we will be making two different traditional Japanese delicacies. We will not reveal the exact recipes but we would like to double check that there are no allergies to certain ingredients:

  •  rice vinegar

  • sugar

  • white chocolate

  • salt

  • creamed cheese

  • sushi rice

  • nori (dried seaweed)

  • cucumber

  • carrot

  • puffed rice (Rainbow Drops)

  •  yellow peppers

  • spring onions

  • soy sauce

Let us know A.S.A.P. if there are any issues with the above ingredients. Please bring an apron or an oversized t-shirt for hygiene reasons.

ありがとうございました  Arigato

 

P7M Homework – Monday 19th September

Remember to complete each task to the best of your ability. Please let me know if you are struggling with any task or need advice, as soon as possible.

Language

  • Read chapters 37-50 and 2 BD jobs. This fortnight’s BD jobs are Summariser and Question Master. You have been told which chapters to summarise. Either chapters 37-39/40-43/44-47/48-50. You should read the chapters and complete the  jobs by Friday 30th  September. Both jobs have been modelled for you in class and you had a go at them. Click here to remind you how to complete both jobs.
  • Spelling – Complete Unit/List 2 in your Spelling Homework jotters for Wednesday 21st September. Click here   to practise your spelling words (not compulsory). Click here to see a good example of the completed spelling tasks.
  • Personal Reading Challenge – Throughout the year, please read extra texts on top of the class novels. Record what you have read and complete the tasks on the Personal Reading Challenge sheet.

Maths

Topic

  • Topic personal project – This should be completed by Tuesday 27th September. Click here to access the task.
  • You have had four weeks to plan and prepare this, and now only have one week left!

Other

  • Bring in any unwanted sweet tins/tubs A.S.A.P. These will be used so you will not be able to take them home again.
  • House Captains wear a white shirt and tie on Tuesday 20th for a photograph.
  • Please bring in an apron or clean, oversized t-shirt on Tuesday 20th for our Japanese cooking session.
  • European Language Day on Thursday 22nd – Please wear your House colours.
  • Return any letters A.S.A.P.
  • P.E. Monday

 dalai-5

P7 Book Detectives – Question Master & Summariser

We completed an activity in class to learn about the three different types of questions you can ask. They are:

  • Literal – the answer is literally there in the text!
  • Inferential – the answer is not explicitly written, but you can read the between the lines to find it.
  • Evaluative – you are using your own opinion, knowledge and personal experiences of the world to answer

For your Question Master job you need to ask six questions (two literal, two inferential and two evaluative) and give detailed answers to each question. Your answers should explain your answer with evidence (quotes, page numbers or your own personal experience) to support your answer.

See the example below to give you an idea of how you should complete the Question Master task.

Question Master Chapters 21-36

  1. Literal – What did Mr. Sir’s face look like after the Warden had scratched him?   Answer: p104 Mr. Sir’s face had swollen to the size of half a cantaloupe and it had dark-purple jagged lines running down his cheeks.
  2. Literal – Who hit Mr Pendanski with a shovel? Answer: Zero hit Mr Pendanski with his shovel (p139).
  3. Inferential – How was the rattlesnake feeling when ‘it’s tail was pointed upward, rattling’? Answer: p93 The rattlesnake was feeling threatened because Stanley was near him and rattlesnakes shake their tails to warn of predators.
  4. Inferential – How was Stanley feeling when he stole the truck? Answer: p147 Stanley was feeling desperate and panicked. He was desperate to find Zero because he was thinking about how he would be thirsty and close to death in the desert so he panicked and jumped in the truck!
  5. Evaluative – How do you think Stanley felt when Twitch was assigned Zero’s bed? Answer: I think Stanley would have felt like it was a bit insensitive because he was already missing Zero and now a new boy just slipped into his place without a blink of an eye.
  6. Evaluative – Why do you think Kate Barlow kept finding jobs for Sam to do? Answer: I think Kate kept finding jobs for Sam because she enjoyed his company and wanted him to hang around, which is why she eventually fell in love with him.

Summariser

Literacy Outcome: To show my understanding across different areas of learning, I can identify and consider the purpose and main ideas of a text and use supporting detail. LIT 2-16a

A summariser job should:

  • explain the main events of the chapters
  • answer the 5 Ws (who? what? when? where? why?)
  • be approximately one A4 page in length (depending on the size of your handwriting)
  • not bother with insignificant details of the plot
  • be written in your own words

Example of a summary of Chapters 1-5

The scene of the bleak Camp Green Lake is set. It is a desert, not a lake at all. There is no shade except over the Warden’s hammock. There are rattlesnakes and scorpions that live in holes dugs by the campers. But most worrying, are the deadly yellow-spotted lizards. If one bites you, you get to leave the camp… but unfortunately will die.

The reason “campers” go to Camp Green Lake is made clear; it is a juvenile correction facility for boys. As punishment each boy must dig a hole (five feet deep and five feet across) every day in the desert heat. Supposedly their hard work will turn a “bad boy” into a “good boy.” Stanley Yelnats, a chubby fifteen-year-old boy from a poor family, chose Camp Green Lake over going to jail. He thought it would be like a summer camp, something he had never before had the opportunity to experience.

Stanley rides the un-airconditioned bus to Camp Green Lake handcuffed to the armrest. Stanley tries to pretend that he is going to Camp Fun and Games, a place he had imagined while playing with his toys when he was younger.

At home Stanley had no friends and was bullied, even by his teachers who unintentionally could embarrass him about his weight. Stanley is a good kid and is actually innocent of the crime for which he is being sent to Camp Green Lake. As is the joke in his family, Stanley blames his misfortune on his no-good-dirty-rotten-pig-stealing-great-great-grandfather. His great -great-grandfather had reportedly stolen a pig from a one-legged gypsy and brought a curse down upon the family forever.

Stanley’s father was Stanley Yelnats III, making the Stanley in the novel Stanley Yelnats IV. Stanley’s father was an unsuccessful inventor, looking for a use for old trainers. Stanley’s great-grandfather, Stanley Yelnats I, made money in the stock market, but was robbed of everything and left stranded in the desert by the outlaw Kissin’ Kate Barlow. Unfortunately all of the Stanleys to date had bad luck, though they always remained hopeful. Upon arriving at Camp Green Lake, Stanley notes, “hardly anything was green.”

P7 Maths Homework – Angles (for Wed 21st Sept)

Drawing, Measuring and Naming Angles

Draw, measure, name (acute, right, obtuse, reflex) and label (ABC)the following angles in your jotter. Remember your drawing should be within 2° of accuracy .e.g. if the angle should be 215°, it will need to be either 213°, 214°, 215°, 216° or 217°  .

  1. ABC 215°
  2. DEF 90°
  3. KLM 46°
  4. STU 267°
  5. WXY 175°
  6. NOP 103°
  7. QRS 307°
  8. FGH 180°
  9. XYZ 67°
  10. MNO 348°

We will be covering this in class, however please visit https://www.mathsisfun.com/angles.html for advice.

P7M Mangahigh Homework – Friday 16th

Just a reminder to those of you who have not attempted your Mangahigh homework, that it is due for Friday 16th at 3.15pm. If you are having problems accessing the internet, please let me know and/or use the IT room for a short time during lunch.

screen-shot-2016-09-14-at-18-28-25

Well done to the people below for a superb effort in the various challenges!

Gold Silver Bronze Fire Starter Attempted
Rachel B

Laura x2

Jack

Tori

Laura

Rachel B

Niamh

Euan

Amy

Tori x 2

Amy

Ben

Gemma

Tori

Ben

Euan

Andrew

Harry

Keeley

Reuben
Niamh

Gemma

Andrew

Jack

Ben

Euan

Amy

Ryan G

P7 – What is Fracking?

fracking

What is fracking? Today you will be accessing a number of resources to find out the answer to this question. This task will be completed in three parts.

In your topic jotters you should take detailed notes, with suitable headings. Remember your notes should include important vocabulary relevant to the topic you are researching. Definitions of this vocabulary should also be included to help with your understanding. Please ensure each group member takes detailed notes as you will ALL require the information for the third part of the task which will take place next week.

BEFORE accessing the links below, please read over the task sheet carefully with your group members to ensure everyone is aware of the areas they should be researching. Any sections of the task sheet which require group discussion should also be completed at this time.


Please note that some of the videos also have written information. You should ensure you access BOTH resources. Fracking is a controversial subject and many people feel passionately about it. Some provocative language and phrases are used to get the public to feel and act.

Fracking: Videos (Class Teacher will show these)

Fracking in Scotland

Telegraph: How Hydraulic Fracturing Works Video

What is fracking and why is it controversial? (Class Teacher will show this)

Karate with Sensei Harrison

On Friday afternoon we were honoured to have Mr Harrison come in to teach us a few Karate moves. He brought one of his karate students, Gillen with him. He explained that he has been learning the art of Karate for 30 years and is a black belt. He has competed all around the world including Russia and Japan. Karate means ’empty hands’ and Karate-Do means ‘the way of empty hands’. He explained that Karate began in the island of Okinawa when attackers took away the islanders weapons, so they had to use only their bare hands and feet to break through the defences.

Mr Harrison taught us that when practising Karate you should be calm and quiet to allow you to fully focus on yourself and your movements. At some points you could hear a pin drop – well done! Before practising blocks with a partner you have to bow and say ‘Osu’ (pronounced ‘oss’). We also had to opportunity to practise our punches and kicks using pads held by Mr Harrison and Gillen.

The final treat was a sight to behold! Gillen broke a piece of wood using only his elbow! Before hitting the board he focussed his thoughts and became very quiet and calm. It all happened very quickly and we were very impressed. A huge thank you to Mr Harrison and Gillen for taking the time to work with us and teach us a few moves.

On Friday afternoon we were honoured to have Mr Harrison come in to teach us a few Karate moves. He brought one of his karate students, Gillen with him. He explained that he has been learning the art of Karate for 30 years and is a black belt. He has competed all around the world including Russia and Japan. Karate means ’empty hands’ and Karate-Do means ‘the way of empty hands’. He explained that Karate began in the island of Okinawa when attackers took away the islanders weapons, so they had to use only their bare hands and feet to break through the defences.

Mr Harrison taught us that when practising Karate you should be calm and quiet to allow you to fully focus on yourself and your movements. At some points you could hear a pin drop – well done! Before practising blocks with a partner you have to bow and say ‘Osu’ (pronounced ‘oss’). We also had to opportunity to practise our punches and kicks using pads held by Mr Harrison and Gillen.

The final treat was a sight to behold! Gillen broke a piece of wood using only his elbow! Before hitting the board he focussed his thoughts and became very quiet and calm. It all happened very quickly and we were very impressed. A huge thank you to Mr Harrison and Gillen for taking the time to work with us and teach us a few moves.

 

Karate with Sensei Harrison

On Friday afternoon we were honoured to have Mr Harrison come in to teach us a few Karate moves. He brought one of his karate students, Gillen with him. He explained that he has been learning the art of Karate for 30 years and is a black belt. He has competed all around the world including Russia and Japan. Karate means ’empty hands’ and Karate-Do means ‘the way of empty hands’. He explained that Karate began in the island of Okinawa when attackers took away the islanders weapons, so they had to use only their bare hands and feet to break through the defences.

Mr Harrison taught us that when practising Karate you should be calm and quiet to allow you to fully focus on yourself and your movements. At some points you could hear a pin drop – well done! Before practising blocks with a partner you have to bow and say ‘Osu’ (pronounced ‘oss’). We also had to opportunity to practise our punches and kicks using pads held by Mr Harrison and Gillen.

The final treat was a sight to behold! Gillen broke a piece of wood using only his elbow! Before hitting the board he focussed his thoughts and became very quiet and calm. It all happened very quickly and we were very impressed. A huge thank you to Mr Harrison and Gillen for taking the time to work with us and teach us a few moves.

P7 Maths Revision website

maths 1

Throughout Primary 7 you will be introduced to a few new maths concepts as well as revising and being challenged by concepts you have already learned.

The website below has questions for every Maths and Numeracy Experience and Outcome in the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence. Please use the questions to help you practise, revise and improve on these concepts. Enjoy!

https://uk.ixl.com/standards/scotland/maths/second-level

Creative Writing Competition for 9-16 year olds

my paisley adventure poster

About Our Competition
The town of Paisley is buzzing with talk of the Bid for City of Culture 2021. Here at Oak Tree Arts, we’re very excited to learn about all of the wonderful events and activities which are springing up all over the town. Of course we didn’t want to be left out of the fun, so we’re going to have our own event. A creative writing competition to celebrate our fair town.
We want to know what sort of adventures could be going on in Paisley. Stories can be written in any genre and any style. A recounting of a real life event, a story of the towns history, or a fantasy adventure! Fighting dragons, or finding fairies? Best friends and school drama? The tale of the Paisley Witches or the Sma shot strikes? Anything goes. As long as it takes place in Paisley.
Details of the Competition
Free To enter
Ages 9 – 12 and 13 – 16
500 – 1000 words
Send Entries to:
Post or drop off: Oak Tree Arts Competition
                              Abbey Books
                              2 Well Street
                              Paisley
Closing date : 24th October 2016
Winners announced : 14th November 2016
Book Launch: 17th December 2016
Prizes:
Winners will receive a certificate, a creative writing goodie bag and have their stories published in our end of year book. The winners and their families will be invited to attend our book launch party on Saturday 17th December, where their prizes will be awarded.
Judges:
The competition entries will be judged by three local writers. Victoria Gemmell, Leona Gary and Susan Kirkwood.
I hope that you will be able to pass this information along to any interested parties, or perhaps use it as a class project.
If you would be interested in organising a creative writing workshop with some of our writers, would like any more information about this competition, or any of our other projects,  please get in touch.
hello@oaktreearts.co.uk 
01415626757

P7M Homework – Monday 12th September

Remember to complete each task to the best of your ability. Please let me know if you are struggling with any task or need advice, as soon as possible.

Language

  • Reading Ch23-36 (p101-166) and 2 BD jobs – You should read the chapters and complete the Mind Map and Illuminator jobs by Friday 16th September. Click here to remind you how to complete both jobs and here to see good examples of the jobs completed pupils in our class. Remember to choose a passage from the book to read to your BD group.
  • Spelling – Complete Unit/List 2 in your Spelling Homework jotters for Wednesday 21st September. Click here   to practise your spelling words (not compulsory). Click here to see a good example of the completed spelling tasks.
  • Personal Reading Challenge – Throughout the year, please read extra texts on top of the class novels. Record what you have read and complete the tasks on the Personal Reading Challenge sheet.

Maths

  • Complete the three assigned challenges on Mangahigh. Try your best to beat your own personal best. If you have any problems, please let me know A.S.A.P. These tasks should be attempted by Friday 16th September. We will be covering this in class but visit this website for advice: https://www.mathsisfun.com/angles.html
  • Use the IT room for 15 minutes at lunchtime if you need to.

Topic

  • Japanese Products – please make a note of any Japanese products, logos or brand names you have in your house or see in your everyday life. Please have this for Monday 12th Sept.
  • Topic personal project – This should be completed by Tuesday 27th September. Click here to access the task.

Other

  • Please ask your parent/carer to complete and return the note about Parent Appointments by Friday 16th September
  • Return any letters A.S.A.P.
  • P.E. Monday and Thursday

Follow the 3 RES

Comparing Lives in Japan and Scotland

imgres imgres-1

Learning Outcome:

By comparing the lifestyle and culture of citizens in Japan with those of Scotland, I can discuss the similarities and differences. SOC 2-19a

Skill for Learning: Analysis – I can compare and contrast lifestyles in Japan with Scotland by using my own personal experience and research.

Please use the weblinks below as well as the topic books to find out as much as you can about life for children and adults in Japan. You will then use this information to compare it to your own life and the adults you interviewed. You should take notes (key words and phrases) about the daily routine of Japanese children and adults. While you are researching, you should be thinking about your life and the information you gathered from your interview(s) of adults. Other questions to think about and information to research:

  • child’s daily routine (what time do they get up? go to school? go to bed?)
  • what is school life like for a Japanese child?
  • what do children/adults/families do in their spare time?
  • what age do children start school and move onto secondary school?
  • what are men and women’s role in the family?
  • how often do they spend time as a family (including their grandparents)?
  • what are typical daily meals?

A Day in the Life

A Kid’s Life in Japan

Children in Japan (use the tabs on the left-handside to navigate the website)

Housing, Food & Clothes

Everyday Life in Japan

Home Life

Various Schools – Urban and Rural

School in Japan (video – Teacher to show whole class)

P7S – German Alphabet

On Friday, we recapped on German greetings and the alphabet. We played a variety of games to practise the pronunciation of each letter and to help us remember the sound. Please use the links below to practise at home.

Digital Dialects – Alphabet

Babel Nation – Alphabet

Watch the video below to hear you singing the German alphabet to the tune of Frere Jacques, as a round. I was very impressed so see if you can sing it to someone at home to impress them too. Well done! Miss McDowall

P7 Good examples of Book Detectives

A huge well done to those of you who completed your Illuminator and Mind Map jobs for Book Detectives. Some of you will be handing it on Monday which I look forward to reading. These help to make your BD sessions every second Friday a quality discussion. It shows me you have thought about and understood what you have read.

As with lots of the tasks in P7, we expect a lot more of you and I am pleased to say I am very happy with the majority of the work handed in. Some of you have a few things to work on so please read and follow your next steps I have written in your jotter.

Please see the examples below of good quality P7 Book Detective jobs. These might help to guide and motivate you to up-level your own work.

Is it your work that is being used as a good example? If so, let someone at home know!

 

P7 Spelling Homework Feedback

After marking your first P7 Spelling Homework, there are a few points I’d like to clarify. In general, they were a good standard with neat handwriting, well laid out and the sections completed correctly. So well done. However, there were a few common mistakes I’d like to correct:

  • One list/unit per fortnight. Quite a lot of you had completed Unit/List 1 and 2. You only complete one per fortnight .e.g. the spelling rule we are focussing on. The reason you sometimes have more than one unit on a spelling sheet is to save paper.
  • You must write the date in the margin (2.9.16) and an appropriate title .e.g. Unit 1 ‘ac-‘ ‘ad-‘. ‘Spelling Homework’ is not specific enough because it will all be spelling homework in your Spelling Homework jotter!
  • Please write the sub-headings of each section. This will help you to check you have completed them all.
  • Please read the instructions carefully to ensure you are completing the task correctly. A lot of you never completed each section correctly. Please see the example below to check how it should be completed.
  • Section 3 – Fill in the missing words should have every sentence copied and completed in your jotter AND choose one of the spelling words to write one sentence of your own.
  • Please correct any mistakes. Remember the marking code.

Screen Shot 2016-09-03 at 11.09.11

DSCF9486 DSCF9487

P7M Homework – Monday 5th September

Remember to complete each task to the best of your ability. Please let me know if you are struggling with any task or need advice, as soon as possible.

Language

  • Reading Ch23-36 (p101-166) and 2 BD jobs – You should read the chapters and complete the Mind Map and Illuminator jobs by Friday 16th September. Click here to remind you how to complete both jobs and here to see good examples of the jobs completed pupils in our class. Remember to choose a passage from the book to read to your BD group.
  • Spelling – There is no spelling lists this week but please practise the first 100 common words by playing the games at Spell Zone
  • Personal Reading Challenge – Throughout the year, please read extra texts on top of the class novels. Record what you have read and complete the tasks on the Personal Reading Challenge sheet.

Maths

  • Complete three challenges on Mangahigh. Try your best to beat your own personal best. If you have any problems, please let me know A.S.A.P. These tasks should be attempted by Friday 9th September.
  • Use the IT room for 15 minutes at lunchtime if you need to.

Topic

  • Japanese Products – please make a note of any Japanese products, logos or brand names you have in your house or see in your everyday life. Please have this for Monday 12th Sept.
  • Topic personal project – This should be completed by Tuesday 27th September. Click here to access the task.

Other

  • Return any letters, permission slips etc. A.S.A.P.
  • Remember to research for your Fairtrade debate on Thursday.
  • P.E. Thursday and Friday this week. We have a special visitor on Friday to teach us Karate, instead of badminton on Monday.

teamwork-makes-the-dream-work-47

Maths Websites & Mental Maths Strategies

The 72 Learn Its

Hit the Button

Maths Dictionary

Angles

Alien Angles

Shape

 2D Shape

Square Numbers and Square Roots

Mental Maths Strategies

When answering maths questions, especially worded problems, it is important to know how to work through it. Below are some hints and tips on how to tackle maths questions and worded problems.

Problem Solving Strategies

*Remember that not all of these are suitable for every maths question. Choose the best strategy for the problem you are working on.

  • Look for the important words in the question. Write them down or underline them. Decide on what the question is asking you to do .e.g. multiplication? fractions? subtraction?
  • Look for a pattern. Can you see somehting happening over and over again? Will this help you solve the problem?
  • Have a go! Try an answer. Does the answer make sense?
  • Use a table or a chart. Will something like this help?
  • Use a drawing. Can you draw something about the problem? Will this help you to find the answer?
  • Work backwards. Can you start at the ned of the question to help work it out? Will your answer work?
  • Try an easier problem. Can you change the numbers in the question to make it simpler? Will this make finding the answer easier?
  • Make a model. Can you use paper or blocks to help you find the answer? Can you use people to help you find the answer?
  • Think logically. Can you tell somehting about the answer straight away? Can you get rid of answers that are not correct?

Mental Maths Strategies

*We will be practising these strategies in class throughout the year. Use the strategies that feel best to you because not every one will ‘feel’ natural for you.

mental 1 mental 2 mental 3 mental 4mental 5 mental 6 mental 7 mental 8 mental 9 mental 10 mental 11 mental 12

Use the maths links on the Blog and the maths online dictionary to remind yourself of some of the concepts you might not remember.

Mathematical Vocabulary – Word Problem Words

Increased by: The class had 15 pupils and was increased by 10 children. How many children are there in the class now?

 more: Julie has 21 Beanie Babies in her collection – her sister Emma has 10 more. How many does Emma have?

combined/put together: Jake and Joel combined their pocket money of £5.50 each to buy the new Xbox game. How much money did they have together?

 total (smaller numbers): There were 8 Roses, 12 Carnations, and 2 Daisies. How many flowers did they have in total?

 sum: Alexis earned £10 washing cars and Sarah earned £15. What was the sum of their earnings?

 added to: Ellie saved £3.50 last week. Added to savings of £2 this week, how much does she now have?

 altogether: Jake has 13 sweets and Jarratt has 22! How many sweets do they have altogether?

in all: Auntie Anne gives Jade 12 carrots from her allotment and her mum brings back a bag of 8 from Asda. How many carrots does she have in all?

additional: Ben has 105 Harry Potter collector cards. If he had ten additional baseball cards, how many would he have in all?

 decreased by: The population of 1000 whales decreased by 400 in the last year. How many are left?

minus: She had £10, minus the amount she spent on the £3 drink. How much did she have in all?

drops/dropped: The temperature was 4° and just dropped by another 3°! What is the temperature now?

 difference between /difference of: Gemma’s mum gives her £3.50 pocket money for hovering and polishing through the house. James gets £5 for doing the same thing. What is the difference between their pocket money?

More than: Jacob has 16 marbles – that’s 12 more than William. How many marbles does William have?

Less than: Sarah has 20 sweets and her sister Suzie has 5 less than her. How many sweets does Suzie have?

Fewer: Jenny baked six fewer cookies than Elizabeth, who made 12. How many cookies does Jenny have?

How many more?: Kate has 20 Daises and Emily has 31. How many more Daises does Emily have than Kate?

How much more?: Billy has spent the last year saving £150 – he desperately wants a laptop that costs £300. How much more does he need to buy it?

 Left: Mrs. Bee bakes 30 beautiful chocolate-chip muffins for the adults in school. 18 people grab one at break. How many are left?

 remain/remains: There are 15 people on the bus and 3 people get off. How many people remain on the bus?

Words ending in “er” (higher, longer, faster, heavier, larger, shorter, slower, further, etc.): Jack can run 100m in 25 seconds but Andrew can do it in 14! How much faster is Andrew’s 100m race than Jack’s?

 Take away: Jamie has 12 biscuits. If his mum takes away 10, how many does he have?

 TWICE: Elijah Wood, the actor in ‘lord of the Rings,’ played a hobbit that was 120cm tall but in real life the actor is twice as tall! How tall is he really?

 TIMES: Caroline’s school bag weighs 2g but her brother, Ollie, likes to take lots of books to school – his bag weighs 5 times as much! What does his weigh?

 multiplied by: There used to be 100 children in school. The number of pupils has multiplied by three in the last few years! How many children are there now?

 product of: What is the product of five and four?

 in all: At the cinema (screen 8) there were 10 rows of seats and 20 chairs in each row. How many seats were there in all?

 total: In the garden there are five rows with five plants in each row. How many plants are there total?

 each: Each pair of socks cost £1.00. How much will six pairs cost?

 doubled, tripled, quadrupled etc.: There were 3,000 rabbits in the UK. The population (total number of rabbits) tripled in two years. How many are there now?

equal / equally: I bought a dozen (12) eggs from the market this morning and split them equally between two boxes. How many eggs went in each box?

 separate: Hannah and I make 50 friendship bracelets – we decide to separate them evenly and sell them. How many bracelets do we each have?

 share: Bailey brings in 60 sweets for his birthday and decides to share them out in class. There are 20 children in his class – how many sweets do they each receive?

 split: On a class trip, there is a class of 24 children and they are split into 6 groups. How many children are in each group?

 group/groups: At swimming, the class of 32 children is split evenly into two groups. How many pupils are in each group?

 fractions (half, quarter, fifth, sixth, tenth etc.): Kieran has £20. He spends half of this money on cat food – how much does he have left for other things?

P7 Visit from The Music Man!

We were very lucky to have a visit from Mr Laird from Saturday Music Centre at Paisley Grammar. He played various instruments including the saxophone, flute, clarinet, tuba and baritone. We had to guess whether they were going to make a high or low sound and then what tune he played.

There is a ‘Come and Try’ Day on Saturday 10th September, where P7 pupils can hear and then try out a number of musical instruments. If they show an aptitude for a particular instrument, they may then be offered a course of lessons funded by the Creative Scotland’s Youth Music Initiative scheme. The lessons are free of charge for the first year of tuition. Letters available on request.

Have a look at Mr Laird playing the instruments.

DSCF2280 DSCF2281 DSCF2282 DSCF2283 DSCF2284 DSCF2285 DSCF2286 DSCF2287 DSCF2288 DSCF2289 DSCF2290 DSCF2291 DSCF2292 DSCF2293 DSCF2294 DSCF2295 DSCF2296 DSCF2297 DSCF2298 DSCF2299

P7 Buddhism Beliefs & Practices

b4

Learning Outcome: I can show understanding of the beliefs and practices of Buddhism and explore the similarities and differences between these and my developing beliefs. RME 2-04c

Skill for Learning: Synthesis – I can research about a belief or practice of Buddhism and explain it to my peers.

 Social Skill: Disagreeing without criticising people – I can show/explain my feelings about someone’s idea/opinion without offending them.

Background

Buddhists believe that the Buddha saw the truth of what the world is like, and they follow his teachings. They have many beliefs and practices they follow in order to live their lives in a Buddhist way.

Task

In your group, you are going to research the key Buddhist beliefs, how they worship and live their lives. You will be researching one of the following beliefs or practices:

  • the 3 Jewels (Triple Gem)
  • the Four Noble Truths
  • the Eightfold Path
  • the 5 Precepts
  • their sacred text
  • how and where they worship (Puja)

You will learn as much as you can about your given subject and present your findings to the rest of the class in an imaginative way. Remember that they do not know anything about your topic, so your presentation should be informative as well as entertaining.

Presentation Criteria

Your presentation should:

  • include key points about your subject
  • inform the class about your subject
  • involve everyone in your group
  • be creative
  • be informative
  • entertain your peers
  • mention how Buddhist beliefs compare to the beliefs of the people on your group
  • be 3-4 minutes in length

Please use the weblinks and video below to find out as much as you can about your given subject.

Please watch the relevant video below:

Triple Gem (no need for sound)

Four Noble Truths (headphones needed)

The Eightfold Path (headphones needed)

The Five Precepts (use headphones if there are any spare)

 Buddhist Worship (headphones are needed)

 

P7 All About Japan Task

Today you will be finding out “All About Japan”. Your task is to research a number of areas relating to Japanese lifestyle and culture. Please read you task sheet very carefully to ensure you know exactly which areas you are requiring information for. As discussed in class, you should refer closely to the focus skills highlighted today to ensure the success of this task.

Please access the links below to find the required information. You should NOT access any other websites without the permission of the class teacher.

Population

Japan: Factslides

Nature & Climate

Japanese Culture

Language

Sports

National Flag & Anthem

National Anthem with sub-titles

National Flower

Japanese Symbols

Japan: Fact Monster

Homes, Food & Clothing

Government

The Imperial Family

How to Count to Ten in Japanese

Greetings

Comparing Lives – Scotland and Japan

scotland flag japan 1

 

Learning Outcome:

By comparing the lifestyle and culture of citizens in Japan with those of Scotland, I can discuss the similarities and differences.  SOC 2-19a

Skill for Learning: Analysis – I can compare and contrast lifestyles in Japan with Scotland by using my own personal experience and research.

Task

In order to get a better understanding of life in Japan you will be researching what life is like for children and adults living there now. You will need to think about the similarities and differences between life in Scotland and Japan. You have your own personal and experiences of life as a child in Scotland but you will need to interview a few adults to get more information about what life is like for them.

For Monday 5th September you should interview at least one adult (parent/grandparent/aunt/uncle etc) to find out about their daily routine and their role in the family. Some suggested questions you might want to ask:

  • what time they get up?
  • do they have a job? Have they always had the same job? what age did they start working?
  • what do they enjoy doing in their spare time?
  • what do they enjoy doing with the family in their spare time?
  • what is their role in the family?
  • what daily chores in the house do they do?

Please record your findings.