Mossend Primary School & Nursery Class

Where stars shine brighter

Learning & Teaching

Curriculum for Excellence

Information has been produced to help parents and carers understand better how their children will benefit from changes under Curriculum for Excellence as the new qualifications are introduced.

This information has been developed closely with the National Parent Forum and covers information on Curriculum for Excellence, the key benefits for young people, and examples of the different routes pupils can take through their education from age 3-18.

This information is available from www.educationscotland.gov.uk/parentzone.

Click an area of the curriculum below to view more information

 

 

Expressive Arts

The expressive arts include experiences and outcomes in art and design, drama, dance and music.

Through the expressive arts, children and young people can have rich opportunities to be creative and imaginative and to experience inspiration and enjoyment.
They can come to understand the important roles of the arts in describing and changing society.
Through their experience of the expressive arts, children and young people can appreciate the contributions of the arts in the lives of individuals and communities.

Learning through the expressive arts enables children and young people to:

  • express themselves in different ways and be creative
  • experience enjoyment (and contribute to other people’s enjoyment) through creative and expressive performance and presentation
  • develop important skills specific to expressive arts and also transferable skills
  • develop an appreciation of aesthetic and cultural values and ideas
  • for some, prepare for advanced learning and future careers by building foundations for excellence in the expressive art

Health & Wellbeing

Health and wellbeing includes experiences and outcomes for personal and social development, understanding of health, physical education and physical activity, and contributions from home economics.
It also includes approaches and activities such as physical activity and nutrition, planned by pre-school settings, schools or colleges to promote the health and wellbeing of their learners and the wider community.

Children and young people need to experience what it feels like to develop, enjoy and live a healthy lifestyle.
They also need to learn ways of dealing with the many new and challenging situations they will experience throughout their lives.
A healthy lifestyle supports physical, social and emotional wellbeing, and underpins successful learning.
Concerns about the health, diet and activity levels of Scotland’s children and young people, social inclusion and inequalities in health emphasise the importance of a focus on health and wellbeing throughout education, starting in the early years.

Learning through health and wellbeing enables children and young people to:

  • experience positive aspects of healthy living and activity for themselves
  • develop the knowledge and understanding, skills, abilities and attitudes necessary for their physical, emotional and social wellbeing now and in their future lives
  • make informed decisions in order to improve their physical, emotional and social wellbeing
  • apply their physical, emotional and social skills to pursue a healthy lifestyle
  • make a successful move to the next stage of education or work
  • for some, open up opportunities to excel in sport or to pursue careers in health and leisure industries.

Literacy

The development of literacy skills plays an important role in all learning.

Pupils develop and extend  literacy skills when they have opportunities to:

  • communicate, collaborate and build relationships
  • reflect on and explain  literacy and thinking skills, using feedback to help them improve and sensitively provide useful feedback for others
  • engage with and create a wide range of texts in different media, taking advantage of the opportunities offered by ICT
  • develop an understanding of what is special, vibrant and valuable about their own and other cultures and their languages
  • explore the richness and diversity of language, how it can affect them, and the wide range of ways in which they can be creative
  • extend and enrich vocabulary through listening, talking, watching and reading.

In developing my English language skills pupils:

  •  engage with a wide range of texts and develop an appreciation of the richness and breadth of Scotland’s literary and linguistic heritage
  • enjoy exploring and discussing word patterns and text structures.

Modern Languages

Learning a new language encourages children and young people to broaden their horizons as they explore the language and its associated culture.

Through the learning of new language pupils:

  • gain a deeper understanding of their first language and appreciate the richness and interconnected nature of languages
  • enhance their understanding and enjoyment of their own and other cultures and gain insights into other ways of thinking and other views of the world
  • develop skills that they can use and enjoy in work and leisure throughout  life.

The study of language plays an important role in all language learning and the development of literacy skills.

Pupils develop and extend literacy skills when they have opportunities to:

  • communicate, collaborate and build relationships
  • reflect on and explain literacy and thinking skills, using feedback to help them improve and sensitively provide useful feedback for others
  • engage with and create a wide range of texts in different media, taking advantage of the opportunities offered by ICT
  • develop an understanding of what is special, vibrant and valuable about their own and other cultures and their languages
  • explore the richness and diversity of language, how it can affect them and the wide range of ways in which they can be creative
  • extend and enrich vocabulary through listening, talking, watching and reading.

Numeracy

Mathematics includes specific aspects of numeracy which will be developed both in mathematics and through activities in other areas of the curriculum.

Putting mathematical knowledge and understanding to constructive use has been one of the decisive factors in shaping societies.
Engineering, science, technology and business rely upon mathematics and continue to find new applications for mathematics.
Cultural development and artistic endeavour are influenced by mathematics.
Each of us uses mathematical skills and concepts in everyday life.
To face the challenges of the 21st century, each young person needs to have confidence in using mathematical skills, and Scotland needs both specialist mathematicians and a highly numerate population.

Learning through mathematics enables children and young people to:

  • develop essential numeracy skills, including arithmetical skills which allow them to participate fully in society
  • develop a secure understanding of the concepts, principles and processes of mathematics and apply these in different contexts, including the world of work
  • have an understanding of the application of mathematics, its impact on our society past and present, and its potential for the future
  • establish firm foundations for further specialist learning, including for those who will be the mathematicians of the future.

Religious & Moral Education

Religious and moral education includes learning about Christianity and other world religions, and supports the development of beliefs and values.
It also includes aspects of philosophical enquiry.

Scotland is now a nation which reflects a wide range of beliefs, values and traditions.
Religious and moral education enables children and young people to explore the world’s major religions and approaches to living which are independent of religious belief, and be challenged by these different beliefs and values.
It supports children and young people in developing responsible attitudes to other people, their values and their capacity for moral judgement.
The study of Christianity, which has shaped the history and traditions of Scotland and continues to exert an influence on national life, is an essential feature of religious and moral education for all children and young people.

Learning through religious and moral education enables children and young people to:

  • develop a knowledge and understanding of Christianity and other world religions and recognise religion as an important expression of human experience
  • explore moral values such as wisdom, justice, compassion and integrity
    investigate and understand the responses which religions can offer to questions about the nature and meaning of life
  • develop the skills of reflection, discernment, critical thinking, and deciding how to act when making moral decisions
  • develop their beliefs, attitudes, moral values and practices through personal search, discovery and critical evaluation, and make a positive difference to the world by putting their beliefs and values into action.

Science

Science includes experiences and outcomes in biological, chemical, physical and environmental contexts.

The most important goal for science education is to stimulate, nurture and sustain the curiosity, wonder and questioning of children and young people.

Young children have a natural sense of wonder and curiosity and are active and eager learners endeavouring to make sense of the world.
They develop ideas through play, investigation, first-hand experience and discussion.
As they grow older children ask searching questions based on their everyday observations and experiences of living things, the environment and the materials, objects and devices they interact with.
Young people are fascinated by new discoveries and technologies and become increasingly aware of, and passionate about, the impact of science on their own health and wellbeing, the health of society and of the environment.

Learning through the sciences enables children and young people to:

  • investigate their environment by observing, exploring, investigating and recording
  • demonstrate a secure understanding of the big ideas and concepts of science
  • make sense of evidence collected and presented in a scientific manner
  • recognise the impact science makes on their lives, on the lives of others, on the environment and on culture
  • express opinions and make decisions on social, moral, ethical, economic and environmental issues informed by their knowledge and understanding of science
  • establish the foundation where appropriate, for more advanced learning and future careers in the sciences and technologies.

Social Studies

Social studies includes experiences and outcomes in historical and geographical, social, political, economic and business contexts.

It is important for children and young people to understand the place where they live and the heritage of their family and community.
Through social studies, children and young people develop their understanding of the world by learning about other people and their values, in different times, places and circumstances, and how their environment has been shaped. They learn about human achievements and to make sense of changes in society, conflicts and environmental issues. With greater understanding comes the opportunity to influence events by exercising informed and responsible citizenship.

Learning through social studies enables children and young people to:

  • broaden their understanding of the world by learning about human activities and achievements in the past and present, political, social and environmental issues, and the values underpinning their own society and other societies
  • develop the capacity for critical thinking, through accessing, analysing and using information
    form their own beliefs and view of the world and develop their understanding of different values, beliefs and cultures
  • establish firm foundations for lifelong learning and, for some, for further specialised study and careers.

Technologies

Within Curriculum for Excellence, the technologies curriculum area relates particularly to contexts that provide scope for developing technological skills, knowledge, understanding and attributes through creative, practical and work-related activities.

Learning in the technologies enables children and young people to be informed, skilled, thoughtful, adaptable and enterprising citizens, and to:

  • develop an understanding of the role and impact of technologies in changing and influencing societies
    contribute to building a better world by taking responsible ethical actions to improve their lives, the lives of others and the environment
  • gain the skills and confidence to embrace and use technologies now and in the future, at home, at work and in the wider community
  • become informed consumers and producers who have an appreciation of the merits and impacts of products and services
  • be capable of making reasoned choices relating to the environment, to sustainable development and to ethical, economic and cultural issues
  • broaden their understanding of the role that information and communications technology (ICT) has in Scotland and in the global community
  • broaden their understanding of the applications and concepts behind technological thinking, including the nature of engineering and the links between the technologies and the sciences
  • experience work-related learning, establish firm foundations for lifelong learning and, for some, for specialised study and a diverse range of careers.

 

 

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