Music and Drama 7/11/17

This focus of the integrated arts inputs this week was music and drama. During these inputs I believe my confidence and ability within the integrated arts curriculum is developing, the skills that I am acquiring are valuable and relevant, which I would implement within my future practice. This week the music input was vastly dynamic, … Continue reading Music and Drama 7/11/17

This focus of the integrated arts inputs this week was music and drama. During these inputs I believe my confidence and ability within the integrated arts curriculum is developing, the skills that I am acquiring are valuable and relevant, which I would implement within my future practice.
This week the music input was vastly dynamic, as 30 primary school pupils from an East Ayrshire school came into the university, the children were teaching us. The children are part of the string project, the fundamental aim of the project is children from primary 4-7 have the opportunity to learn a string based musical instrument along with their class teacher. Being part of this initiative enables children to thrive within the four capacities (success learner, responsible citizen, confident individual and effective contributor) of the Curriculum Excellence. This was evident to myself when the children taught the university student how to the play their musical instruments. The children were very motivated, engaged, resilient, confident and were a credit to their school. The music instrument I was assigned to was the cello, the children were very helpful at showing the university students to different skills required to play the musical instrument. Initially, I felt rather apprehensive as this was the first I have ever attempted to play a string instrument, but I become more assured as the input progressed. Reflecting on this learning experience using the Tallis Habits Pedagogy Wheel I believe I was within the persisting segment of the wheel whilst learning the skills required, to begin with I felt challenge, but I remain focused and sustained the task, kept repeating the skills and at the end input I reviewed and reflect upon what I achieved during the input. Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed and found the input to be insightful, it was a great experience for the children to be ‘teachers’ and I learnt a significant amount in regards to string instruments. The String Project (which is unique to this school) is an excellent project that provides children from all backgrounds the opportunity to play and acquire the skills and understanding necessary to play a string instruments. There are strong collations that music improves children’s behaviour and attainment within education this is heighten by research carried out by the University College London (n.d) that discovered “it (music) has led to curriculum innovation, increased participation and investment, benefiting millions”. Similarly, Nick Gibb (former school minister) (University College London, n.d) denoted that “quality music education improves behaviour, attention and concentration and has a hugely positive effect on numeracy and language skills”. Therefore, this input conveyed the importance of music within primary education and immense empowerment and opportunities children can gain by playing a musical instrument or using voice.
Likewise, this week’s drama input was divergent from the usual, this was due to having the opportunity to micro-teach and participating in students group lessons too. Throughout second year of this degree we are becoming increasingly accustomed to this element of practising teaching. Kalaimathi et.al (p.4, ) defines micro-teaching as “an excellent way to build up skills and confidence, to experience a range of lecturing/ tutoring styles and to learn and practise giving constructive feedback”, likewise adding (p.3, ) “teachers also need appropriate opportunities to practise what they have learnt through stimulated or workshop experience”. During the session it was absorbing to see a range of ways students used to teach their drama lesson one group used a video clip, while another group read from a storybook and likewise a third group created their own story. This allowed the rest of the class to consider the variety of opportunities there are when it comes to teaching drama. In a couple of weeks, the remaining groups will create their own micro-teaching lesson.
Interconnecting both inputs I feel I have been able to develop my confidence and pushed out my comfort zone in array of ways, at particular junctures throughout the day especially when being taught how to play a string instrument and during drama being in a small group propelled myself to take in a larger role when performing. Relating both learning experiences to the Tallis Habit Pedagogy Wheel I would consider that the segments “collaborative and persistent”. As a class we worked collaboratively during drama as we shared our ideas, discussed and explained why those ideas surfaced and received feedback. Likewise, during the music, we worked collaboratively with the primary schools’ pupils as they shared their musical skills with us, similarly explaining and showing us how to play their musical instruments. From my standpoint I believe that my learning experience was “persistent” before the music input I was unsure and apprehensive due to limited knowledge, but I endured the unknowing and continued with the difficulty and remained focused throughout. Overall this week I have been able to develop my understanding and esteem within the integrated arts in particularly music and drama teaching.
References
UCL (2014) Music in Schools: Boosting Achievement, enthusiasm and participation. [Online] Available: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/impact/case-study-repository/music-in-schools [Accessed 12 November 2017]
Kalaimathi, D. and Julius, R. (2015) Micro-Teaching – a way of building up skills. [Online] Available: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=mPtDCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=microteaching&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjCrpTqiMnXAhXCHxoKHbp1AMMQ6wEILzAB#v=onepage&q=microteaching&f=false. [Accessed 12 November 2017].
Tallis, T. (2013) Tallis Habits Pedagogy Wheel. [Online] Available: http://www.thomastallisschool.com/tallis-pedagogy-wheel-guide.html. [ Accessed on 12 November 2017]

Visual Art and Music 14/11/17

This week’s input where based on the visual arts and music. Once again, this week I was able to consider the importance of the Expressive Arts within education and the vitalness that I continue to develop theological and performance knowledge. During the visual arts input we explored primary education and the arts in Lapland. It … Continue reading Visual Art and Music 14/11/17

This week’s input where based on the visual arts and music. Once again, this week I was able to consider the importance of the Expressive Arts within education and the vitalness that I continue to develop theological and performance knowledge.
During the visual arts input we explored primary education and the arts in Lapland. It was rather insightful as Lapland a significant amount of outdoor learning takes place all year round, in spite of having extremely bad weather during winter months. Within the Scottish education system outdoor learning is increasing emerging due to the wealth of learning opportunities the outdoors can provide in relation to children academic and social development. Using outdoor space can be a great way of engaging the children in their learning, there are many Expressive Arts Activities that can be taught outdoors for example;
• Opportunity to explore different types of art media such as chalk.
• Provide space for large-scale painting projects
• Engaging children with nature and seasons, this can be used as stimuli for art work, such as using leaves to create an image.
• Using outdoor space as a setting for drama.
• Children will be able to use their sense to discover new knowledge
• The outdoors can be used to teach music the different sounds and rhythms for nature.
(Thornton and Brunton, 2013)
Also during this week’s visual arts input all student had the opportunity to discuss their placement experience in regards to the Expressive Arts and what form of the arts are being taught. I am fortunate within the school I am currently placed I see a significant amount of the arts being excellently taught. So far, I have seen every form of the Expressive Arts being taught, it is great to see all children are fully engaged, get excited and seem to enjoy the arts. The class teacher is proficient utilising inter-disciplinary learning, for instance in the visual arts the children had to design a house using only three shapes (square, triangles and rectangles). I believe the main aim of this lesson was to develop children creative skills and process in particularly problem solving. Placement tasks will be posted later and will looking in-depth as the expressive arts I have fortunate enough to observe.
Moreover, the central point of this week’s music input was to develop sound, rhythm and notations. Initially I did not have understanding of notations and what each individual note value was, but over the course of the session I was able to acquire a greater understand and increased confidence. During the input was used drum sticks to mick playing drums and what hand movement would be required. We were giving a notation and had to play in rhythm with the backing track, which aided myself in following along with the notations. I found this input to rather enjoyable and was able to take a lot of learning experience with me. Over the music inputs I have most certainly become more self-assured in my ability to teach music skills to children in the future, it is important that I believe in my abilities and do not get nervous when to teach music, as this will most definitely impact on children learning within the arts (Jaap, 2009). It is imperative that I seek advice from arts specialist and engaged with career development within the art, when I am qualified teacher in order to support my skill development and increase the effectiveness of my teaching within the arts (Wilson et.al, 2008).
Connecting both input together there is a clear coloration that using the visual arts as a source for outdoor learning can complement music likewise as children can engaged with the nature scenery and related sounds.
References
Thornton, L and Brunton, P. (2013) Making the most of Outdoor Learning. 1st ed. London: Bloomsbury Publications.
Wilson, G, MacDonald, R, Byrne, C, Ewing, S, and Sheridan, M. (2008) Dread and Passion: primary and secondary teachers’ views on teaching the arts’. curriculum journal. [Abstract Online] Vol 19 (1) pp. 37-53. Available: http://www.research.ed.ac.uk/portal/files/16586710/Wilson_et_al_Curr_Journal_revised_submission.pdf [Accessed 20 November 2017]
Jaap, A. (2009) A Little Music Class. [Online] Available: https://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_434179_en.pdf [Accessed 20 November 2017].
Tallis, T. (2013) Tallis Habits Pedagogy Wheel. [Online] Available: http://www.thomastallisschool.com/tallis-pedagogy-wheel-guide.html. [ Accessed on 20 November 2017]

Integrated Arts Week 12 – 28th November 2017

Today we finalised our section dance. Due to low attendance, both sections were asked to come together to create a dance to be filmed. This meant that students from both sections had to learn the various steps of each other’s dance; this was an effective way to build our tolerance for ambiguity. Once recorded, we …

Continue reading “Integrated Arts Week 12 – 28th November 2017”

Today we finalised our section dance. Due to low attendance, both sections were asked to come together to create a dance to be filmed. This meant that students from both sections had to learn the various steps of each other’s dance; this was an effective way to build our tolerance for ambiguity. Once recorded, we …

Continue reading “Integrated Arts Week 12 – 28th November 2017”

Integrated Arts week 10 – 14th November 2017

We began with music this week, and looking at rhythm and beat. Using only drumsticks or beaters, we learned how to tap out the beat to a number of different songs and genres. Similar to the figure notes system we looked earlier in the module, we used a very basic coded system designed to introduce …

Continue reading “Integrated Arts week 10 – 14th November 2017”

We began with music this week, and looking at rhythm and beat. Using only drumsticks or beaters, we learned how to tap out the beat to a number of different songs and genres. Similar to the figure notes system we looked earlier in the module, we used a very basic coded system designed to introduce …

Continue reading “Integrated Arts week 10 – 14th November 2017”

Integrated Arts Week 9 – 7th November 2017

This week we began the micro-teaching inputs for drama. Our group started with a drama lesson based on Julia Donaldson’s children’s book The Gruffalo (1999).  Using a number of drama conventions introduced previously in this module, we planned and delivered a 30-minute lesson the rest of our section. The initial brief was to plan a …

Continue reading “Integrated Arts Week 9 – 7th November 2017”

This week we began the micro-teaching inputs for drama. Our group started with a drama lesson based on Julia Donaldson’s children’s book The Gruffalo (1999).  Using a number of drama conventions introduced previously in this module, we planned and delivered a 30-minute lesson the rest of our section. The initial brief was to plan a …

Continue reading “Integrated Arts Week 9 – 7th November 2017”

Drama and Music 31/10/2017

This week’s integrated arts inputs and workshops where based on music and drama. Similar to every week I feel I have been able to take useful theory that I will be utilise in my teaching practise in the future. During this week’s music input we explored voice in an array of ways for teaching purposes … Continue reading Drama and Music 31/10/2017

This week’s integrated arts inputs and workshops where based on music and drama. Similar to every week I feel I have been able to take useful theory that I will be utilise in my teaching practise in the future.
During this week’s music input we explored voice in an array of ways for teaching purposes and voice in music. Teachers principle tool of communication is their voice, teachers use their voice constantly often over a loud classroom and school environment. Voice is important for teacher as it allows them to address their pupils, teach their pupil, manage the general classroom and behaviour management. It is therefore vital for teachers to maintain a heathy voice throughout their career, this is conveyed in a GTCS document (Voice and the Teaching Profession, n.d, p.6) that states “teachers are at particular risk of developing voice problems”. The GTCS likewise established that in recent years problems relating to voice have become increasingly prevailing within the profession. A growing number of teachers are seeking advice from speech therapist due to the “majority of (teachers) had problems arising for chronic abuse/ misuse of voice and stress” (GTCS, n.d, p.6). If a teacher develops a significant problem with their voice this could impact on their work leading to absence, stress and impacting on their pupils learning (GTCS, n.d). There are range of circumstances that can cause voice problems/ damage for instance hoarseness (caused by change in weather), the common cold or flu etc. However, in order to reduce strain in voice there is a variety of ways in which teacher can control and maintain their voice.
• Using a different method to get pupils attention in place of voice for example clapping/ singing a tune that pupils must repeat back, facial expressions, gesture (raising hand, hands on hip, give me five).
• Warm voice up, gradually eases into speaking, use a range of tones.
Also, this week in the music input we looked in-depth to singing and the enjoyment that children can get from this aspect of music. There are a range of resources out there for teachers to use, which I am glad, as I am not the most confident singer. The most interesting segment of the input was using music instruments to create and perform a short topic/theme. The lecture provided the class with a range of musical and in groups we created a short piece of music of 4 bars. I would definitely implement this approach to music in the classroom as it would allow children the freedom the choose a topic and use their creativity to express the topic. Bloomfield (2000, p.77) denotes the importance for children trying and testing musical instrument “providing children with access to a broad spectrum of instruments will extend their aural vocabulary and foster the thrill of sound, especially through sound combinations”


The focus of the drama workshop was Halloween, we were initially shown a picture of a large house, this was the bases of our drama. The lecture firstly demonstrated teacher in role and we were informed the house was up for sale, but there had been some circulating that the house was haunted, in groups we were given two minutes to create a drama of going and having a sleep over at the house. When them moved onto the techniques of flashforward/ flashbacks. Dickinson et al (2006) cite that these techniques can be used to help the children focus on outcomes of actions, (flashbacks/ flashforwards) “they encourage reflection and discussion” (p.44). Flashback/ flashforward allow children to think about past events that could lead to future events.
I found this week’s inputs to be insightful and the knowledge I have acquired can be transferred into my future practise.
References
Dickinson, R. Neelands, J. and Shenton Primary School. (2006) Improve Your Primary School Through Drama. Oxon: David Fulton
Bloomfield, A. (2000) Teaching Integrated Arts in the Primary School. Oxon: David Fulton
GTCS (n.d) Voice and the Teaching Profession [online] Available: http://www.gtcs.org.uk/web/FILES/FormUploads/voice-and-the-teaching-profession1652_214.pdf [Accessed: 5th November 2017]

Integrated Arts Week 8 – 31st October 2017

This week’s inputs looked at the different ways we can give children ownership and control of their learning. In contrast to last week’s structured framework for dance and drama, this week focused on allowing children almost complete control. Giving children the opportunity to have a say in their learning shows respect for their abilities and …

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This week’s inputs looked at the different ways we can give children ownership and control of their learning. In contrast to last week’s structured framework for dance and drama, this week focused on allowing children almost complete control. Giving children the opportunity to have a say in their learning shows respect for their abilities and …

Continue reading “Integrated Arts Week 8 – 31st October 2017”

Voice management

As teachers our voice is our main teaching tool. It’s how we communicate with children throughout the day. It’s how we set rules and manage behave. Our tone and volume can tell children a lot about the message we are trying to portray (GRAD, 2017). It is therefore important that we understand how to take […]

As teachers our voice is our main teaching tool. It’s how we communicate with children throughout the day. It’s how we set rules and manage behave. Our tone and volume can tell children a lot about the message we are trying to portray (GRAD, 2017). It is therefore important that we understand how to take […]