Learning through Gallery Education!

During this week session, we were very lucky to have the chance to visit Kevlingrove Art Gallery and Museums. I have visited this museum plenty of time as a child, however I had not been in a very long time and I was unaware what the gallery had to offer. On arrival we were lucky […]

During this week session, we were very lucky to have the chance to visit Kevlingrove Art Gallery and Museums. I have visited this museum plenty of time as a child, however I had not been in a very long time and I was unaware what the gallery had to offer. On arrival we were lucky to have a guide, who gave us a brief workshop that would be available for children all over Scotland. We were informed that the gallery hold various workshops and trips for schools all over Scotland for free of charge which are very informative and often link into topic and IDL learning from the Vikings to Ancient Egypt.

After taking part in the mini session, we then headed up to the gallery and looked at some painting and had the amazing opportunity to look at the painting we have worked with previously Avril Paton’s Windows in the West.

It really was amazing to see the painting in real life. We spoke about the painting and how this could be an amazing tool for literacy and story writing. We discussed many activities we could give children just by putting a photo of a painting up on the board. One activity we discussed would be to give each child a tenement block, and asking them to create a story by focusing on one flat and what’s going on in the window. Before now I would have never of thought of using a visual art piece to inspire writing. Now I know this is an effective way to get children speaking about a painting, and then writing it down on paper.

During our visit we also got to look at the Ancient Egypt section of the museum. We spoke about how this can be a great insight to mathematics and numbers by taking a look at the numerals displayed in the museum. I learned that we really can use art as a stimulus for many areas in the curriculum.

On reflection, I felt very lucky to been of able to explore the gallery and museum, and gain new knowledge about the things that they do on a daily basis for children and even adults. It was a great experience and I would bring my class to experience this great place.

Outdoor Learning

“Learning need not take place solely within educational buildings. The outdoor environment has massive potential for learning. We are extremely fortunate to have such rich urban and rural environments on our doorsteps and our children and young people’s learning experiences can be enhanced by maximising the potential of the outdoors ( Keith Brown MSP, 2010). As […]

“Learning need not take place solely within educational buildings. The outdoor environment has massive potential for learning. We are extremely fortunate to have such rich urban and rural environments on our doorsteps and our children and young people’s learning experiences can be enhanced by maximising the potential of the outdoors ( Keith Brown MSP, 2010).

As an educator I think it is crucial that we inform children that learning does not only take place inside the classroom, and that it takes place every day and especially outdoors. Adams (2008) explains that ” children are learning all the time, in any environment where they find themselves – learning does not only take place in the classroom”. 

During university, we have had lots of opportunities to experience outdoor learning. However, when in placement, I often do not see the children going outdoors often enough. I think it is important that we take children outdoors, as they can learn from what ever environment they are in. Teachers often worry about children being outdoors, and this is a perfect example of the fear of the unknown. Teachers often like the classroom as it is a controlled environment, however outdoor there are greater risks such as children falling and hurting themselves or the boundaries of where the children are allowed to wander off too.

As a future teacher, I think it is important that we take children outdoors as there are huge benefits. When reflecting on outdoor learning, I decided to incorporate this into my concrete poetry. I took my piece of work outside into the garden, and dance around it, and whenever I felt a certain way, I used this feeling to create bursts of colour and visual art! Many different type of dance can take place outside. In a matter of fact, dance outdoors is probably more effective than indoors due to the space and fresh air. This session was useful in highlighting the benefit of being outdoors.

 

Adams, E. (2008) Art and Design Education and the Built Environment. In Coutts, G. and Jokela, T. (Eds) Art. Community and Environment: Educational Perspectives. Bristol: Intellect.

Learning and Teaching Scotland (2010) The Curriculum for Excellence Through Outdoor Learning. [Online]. Available : https://education.gov.scot/Documents/cfe-through-outdoor-learning.pdf [Accessed : 1st March 2018]

 

 

 

 

Adams, E. (2008) Art and Design Education and the Built Environment. In Coutts, G. and Jokela, T. (Eds) Art, Community and Environment: Education Perspectives. Bristol: Intellect.

 

Stem to Steam

    This week’s workshop was based on Stem to Steam, a concept I had never heard of before. Before the workshop, I decided to research Stem to Steam using the materials on moodle. Prior to the session I learned that Steam is an educational framework which brings reality into the classroom. It connects the […]

 

 

This week’s workshop was based on Stem to Steam, a concept I had never heard of before. Before the workshop, I decided to research Stem to Steam using the materials on moodle. Prior to the session I learned that Steam is an educational framework which brings reality into the classroom. It connects the different subjects together in the way they would relate to the outside world and every day life. Steam stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics (STEAM, 2018). Steam connects all of the different subjects together in a way which they would relate to one another. Steam will help children produce skills which they will need to flourish in the 21st centaury.

When watching a clip on steam happening in the classroom, it was interesting to see how the teachers and the children linked together arts with more “tricky” subjects such as engineering and maths. Having a more hands on approach allows the children to explore these subjects in a different way. Learning about steam has taught me that integration is key in learning and concepts have to connect and relate to children to allow them to learn and make sense of them.

During today’s workshop, we got to explore further into Stem and Steam. I think it is great that schools are trying to take a more arts based approached to learning. As a future educator, and in my future placements, I will think of Steam and incorporate into my planning and classroom life to make sure children are getting the best possible opportunities to develop skills to become people who can function in the 21st century.

STEM + ARTS = STEAM

 

STEAM, (2018) Stem to Steam. [Online] Available: http://stemtosteam.org/ [Accessed 1stFebruary 2018]