Category Archives: Lessons

Mathematics – Year 3 – Week 6

Image taken from Google – The money dominoes from the lesson

Unfortunately, this was my last ever lesson with Year 3N and it was devastating to say my goodbyes to them. I was genuinely nearly in tears when they all started clapping and shouting “3 cheers for Miss Whitham, Hip Hip Horray”. I could sob here and now writing this but I won’t I’ll just talk about the lesson. It did go really well and the activities were all my own ideas. I wanted to do a table rotation style lesson were the boys could practice different activities and do it in a really fun way. They did really well, especially with the games but unfortunately the money dominoes were not as successfull because they didn’t have enough time to complete the full game. However, each game gave me a full insight into how the boys were getting on in each area of the curriculum before their exams and topics that they may need to revisit, even in only 5 minutes an activity! So theis is absoloutely something that I would do again as a teacher, and a teaching method that I think the boys enjoyed because they expressed that they would like to do it again, which I was delighted with.

Class/Group: Year 3N                            Lesson: Mathematics                                        Date:10.05.17

 

Previous Experience

Experience in division, money, multiplication, word problems and shapes.

Working towards outcomes of a National Curriculum

Solve problems, including missing number problems, involving division.

Add and subtract amounts of money using both £ and p.

Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4 and 8 multiplication tables.

Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm).

Literacy/Numeracy/ICT/HWB (where appropriate):  Literacy – For games and extension exercises children will be reading the questions and the instructions on the games.
Learning Intentions Success Criteria
Table 1

To know how to divide

Table 2

We are learning to count coins to make a whole number.

Table 3

We are learning about measurement

Table 4

We are learning about different mathematical operations

Table 1

I am able to divide numbers

Table 2

I am able to count coins to make a whole number.

Table 3

I am able to measure objects in cm using a ruler

Table 4

I am able use different mathematical operations

Resources

 

Worksheets, games, dice, projector, online timer, pencils, whiteboards, whiteboard pens, whiteboard rubbers, Smartboard, computer, post it notes, internet access, counters for games, polypockets, toy coins, lego.
Timing   Assessment Methods
 

 

5 mins

2 mins

5 mins

 

 

 

5 mins

 

 

 

 

5 mins

 

 

 

5 mins

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 mins

 

 

5 mins

 

 

 

Total

35 mins

 

Setting the context/ Beginning the lesson (Introduction)

 

 

Discuss the LI for the lesson with the children and explain all of the activities for each table and that each pair will be going to a new activity after 15 minutes until all activities are complete

Separate each table into pairs.

 

Teaching the learning intentions (Development)

 

Table 1

Play the board game. Help with any problems they may have and reinforce the division they do not understand by using Lego and working together in their pairs.

Table 2

Play the dominoes game, each pair using a different set of cards and use the real toy coins with any children/pairs who are having difficulties with the money pictures on the cards.

 

Table 3

Children will go around the room/school measuring objects with rulers in cm and write answers down on worksheets.

 

 

Table 4

Noggle (number boggle). Glue sheet into maths book and by using any mathematical operation (add, subtract, multiply, divide) the solution must make 20 and 36. Write answers into book.

 

Ending the lesson (Plenary)

 

End the lesson by tidying everything away back into their polypockets. Ask the children to sit at their desks.

Go over learning intentions. Write on a post it note about something 3-7 words about something you learnt today. Hand over to class teacher.

Throughout 35 minute lesson class teacher will be working with Child 1 as a TA for differentiation purposes where Child 1 will taking part using Numicon through games etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peer Assessment and Teacher Marking

 

 

 

Observation and Peer Assessment

 

 

 

Observation and Teacher Marking

 

 

 

Teacher Marking

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher Marking the worksheets.

 

 

 

 

 

Observation

 

Success Criteria Results Next steps for the children
From the first game at the first table, I now know that the boys can divide using real life examples

From the second game where the children were learning to count coins to make a whole number, I observed that this was going well for most groups but they would have benefitted from more time.

The scientific measurement game was successful, with correct answers on the sheet after me and the class teacher discussing width with the majority of the class.

The Noggle game was really successful with the boys showing through their sums that they knew their different mathematical operations well enough to create their own sums.

 

Children 1, 7 and 13 need to continue to work with the money dominoes because I was not convinced that they were able to count the coins well enough to play the game.

I am confident for all children to move on to harder division questions except for Child 1 who would benefit from using Numicon further.

 

 

 

EVALUATING MY PRACTICE

Going well (what worked and why?)

The lesson overall went really well with children listening well and there were no behavioural issues. This was most likely down to the amount of activities going on in this fast paced lesson, which allowed the children to be constantly busy, moving around the tables and active.

Most children engaged well with the activities which I think is possibly down to them playing games and not quite realising they’re learning.

Areas for development (what didn’t work and why?)

 

I would in future only do a lesson like this if I had more time. Some of the boys just didn’t have enough time to finish their activities and this was a shame as they could have benefitted with the practice before their exams.

 

Next Steps for Me

In future I will be more aware of what the children have already learned in maths lessons and the way they describe certain methods in mathematics.

I will also try to plan more time into the activities and choose and hour and 10 minutes lesson as opposed to a 35 minute lesson.

Science Lesson – Year 4 – Week 6

Image taken from Google – The boys really like the Twinkl resources

Monday’s lesson was my second science lesson within the school and I am really confident that it went well and know that the boys enjoyed it. Unfortunately there was no real opportunity for the teacher to observe me but did give me some informal feedback that was really positive. I think something that I can take away from this lesson is that I need to work on my assessment skills throughout lessons and that although there are many ways of assessing children it is best to ensure that you are taking it on board as you are teaching, not after you have taught. Furthermore, the boys have been working with twinkl and I continued this in my lesson by workiing with twinkl resources and teaching them what twinkl feel they should know with the added tweak to make it my own lesson. I really like the twinkl resources and think that when I am a teacher this is a website I would like to use more often.

Individual Lesson Plan Format (Primary)

 

Class/Group: Year 4GS                    Lesson: Science                                Date: 8.5.17

 

  Previous Experience

In previous lesson, children have sorted animals into a variety of groups in lesson 1 using different keys.

 
  Working towards outcomes of a National Curriculum

Pupils should be taught to explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment

 
  Literacy/Numeracy/ICT/HWB (where appropriate): ICT – to work on Ipads for extension, Literacy – for reading work off board and on worksheets, Numeracy – working with classifications keys and tables.  
  Learning Intentions Success Criteria  
  To be able to generate questions about animals.

To be able to use questions to sort animals in a key.

To see similarities and differences between vertebrates.

I can generate questions about animals.

I can use questions to sort animals in a key.

I can see similarities and differences between vertebrates.

 
  Resources Photo cards, worksheets, science books, smartboard, pencils, rubbers, glue sticks,  
  Timing Assessment methods
10 mins

 

 

 

 

5 mins

 

5 mins

 

10 mins

 

 

4 mins

20 mins

 

 

 

 

10 mins

 

Total

64 mins

 

Setting the context/Beginning the lesson (Introduction)

Read the information on the Power Point Presentation to introduce children to the concept of classification and ask questions about it.

Teaching the learning intentions (Development)

Introduce the classifications of vertebrate and invertebrate, asking children to give examples of each. Explain that vertebrates can be further split into five groups: amphibians, birds, fish, mammals and reptiles.

 

Explain the broad characteristics of each, asking children to note their similarities and differences. Explain that we will be focussing on vertebrates only today

 

Hand out Vertebrates Photo Sorting cards one per pair. In pairs, sort the cards into animal groups.

Tidy away cards.

Hand out worksheets, glue into science books, answer, ‘yes or no’ questions to sort the vertebrates into animal groups. When children finish they can do the key questions classification sheet.

 

Ending the lesson (Plenary)

Play “20 questions” game from maths but instead of guess a number its guess the vertebrates.

Question and Answer

 

 

 

 

 

Peer Assessment

 

 

 

 

Teacher Marking

 
Success Criteria Results Next steps for the children
I could see that the boys were able to successfully generate questions about animals after marking their classification keys.

From observation and the boys shouting out answers to questions I can see than the boys can all use questions to sort animals in a classification key.

After going over as a class the photo sorting activity game I am confident that the boys can see similarities and differences between vertebrates as each pair got them correct.

Child 5, 8 and 9 did get at least 1 question wrong in the classification keys and would benefit going over this through revision before the Year 4 exams.

It think as a class as a whole the next steps for the boys would be to create their own classification keys from the beginning by going outside and doing some outdoor learning by exploring the outdoor wildlife.

EVALUATING MY PRACTICE
Going well (what worked and why?)

I am pleased at how well this lesson went considering how unfamiliar I am with this topic. It worked well to use twinkle resources as the boys are familiar with these and the resources are bright, colourful and engaging.

The boys were really engaged throughout the lesson, answering questions when asked and volunteering to read off the board.

The boys all, except 3 successfully reached their success criteria and I would feel confident in them moving on to the next stage which I think is great as I feel that I taught them what they needed to know.

Areas for development (what didn’t work and why?)

The boys were quite chatty throughout the lesson and I did have to stop the lesson to tell the boys they were being too noisy and to quieten down. I think this was mainly due to the lesson being at the very end of the day, however this is no excuse and the boys should be listening from the beginning.

I don’t think the boys really needed to do the first classification key as a practice as it was slightly easy for their level and they already knew what to do. On the other hand, 3-4 boys did find this rather tricky let alone the sheets after but for the bulk of the class in was unnecessary.

Next Steps for Me

In future, I will try to assess the children as I am teaching a lesson, as some children already have a good idea about what I intend to teach them and there is no sense in wasting valuable class time teaching them what they already know.

I will continue to use engaging activities in my lessons as the boys are far more engaged in the lesson.

 

Science Lesson – Year 3 – Week 4

Image taken from Google – I was delighted when all the children were able to explain to me what all of these parts were in the plenary! Something went right in this lesson!

Today’s lesson was with Year 3 and I did a science experiment of sorts, with them all and some teaching about different parts of the plants and the functions of the roots. I was pleased that the lesson went well and that the children engaged with the activities and this seemed to show when I recieved some extremely positive and helpful feedback from the class teacher. The plenary worksed well, with all of the children being able to tell me the parts of the plant, so overall I feel this was an extremely successful lesson. The class teacher was on hand to help at all times and with a few areas was able to expand on what I didn’t know. I am looking forward to teaching this Year again in Maths.

Individual Lesson Plan Format (Primary)

 

Class/Group: Year 3N                      Lesson: Science                               Date: 28.04.16

Previous Experience

Children in the class have already worked with soil and explored different types of soil

Working towards outcomes of a National Curriculum

Pupils should be taught to identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers.

Literacy/Numeracy/ICT/HWB (where appropriate): Literacy – children will be writing out words on worksheets.
Learning Intentions Success Criteria
To know the different parts of a plant.

To know how plants grow.

To describe each stage of the growth of roots.

I know the different parts of a plant.

I know how plants grow.

I can describe each stage of the growth of roots.

Resources Smart board/Whiteboard, pencils, worksheets/instructions, glass jars, water, cotton wool, planting beans, water pot, glue, science workbooks, teacher.

 

Timing   Assessment methods
3 mins

 

5 mins

 

8 mins

 

10 mins

 

5 mins

 

12 mins

 

2 mins

 

10 mins

5 mins

 

Total

60 mins

 

Setting the context/Beginning the lesson (Introduction)

Recap what was discussed last lesson with soil and exploring its uses.

Give each boy on the table a number. Talk about plants with the children and what parts of the plant there are.

Teaching the learning intentions (Development)

Hand out the “parts of a plant” worksheet and ask children to fill in the missing words in pairs and stick into workbooks.

Tidy up books and hand out instructions of the next activity. Children each read out a point on the instructions so they are all clear on what they have to do.

Hand out jars, beans, water, cotton wool and worksheets.

Start activity with timer on the board with myself and class teacher going round ensuring that the children are confident in what they are doing.

Tidy up leaving only jars and workbooks etc. on their tables.

Hand out worksheet 1A, glue into books and as a class read through and answer the questions. Leave the bottom blank for children to fill in over next few weeks.

Ending the lesson (Plenary)

Going around the room ask children individually to stand and answer questions about the parts of the plant. Each correct answer set of answers gets a commendation or similar? Dismiss class.

 

Question and Answer

Question and Answer

 

Teacher Marking

 

Observation

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher Marking

 

 

Question and Answer

Success Criteria Results Next steps for the children
From the plenary that I carried out with the children, I know that the children as a class are confident in naming different parts of a plant.

The children have started the first stages they need to learn, to know how plants grow. I am confident that they understand the stages of the growth of roots for this lesson, which I took from discussions with the children and also the question and answer assessment methods.

I am confident that all of the children completed the work that was set for them to a high standard and were happy knowing that they will continue to investigate their beans growing. This will be continued on Tuesday. This will be as a whole class, no children are ahead or behind.

EVALUATING MY PRACTICE

Going well (what worked and why?)

I was able to keep the children engaged throughout because I was teaching in an enthusiastic way and also because I was keeping good time.

My knowledge of the content for the lesson was good so when the children asked questions I was able to confidently and correctly answer these.

My classroom organisation was good by using a range of resource and creating a range of activities so the children would not be bored and engage better.

Areas for development (what didn’t work and why?)

During the lesson, my pace could have been slightly quicker, although I kept good time. Had I have known the children slightly better, this could have been planned for.

Next Steps for Me

In future, I will inform the children at the beginning of the lesson what my expectations for them is because at times, the children were trying to talk over me and taking their time at gluing worksheets into their books.

I will continue to make lessons fun and engaging with a range of activities as the children responded well to this.

 

Mathematics Lesson – Year 4 – Week 4

Image taken from google – I decided to use Mount Everest to tell a story to the boys to work out it height to make the lesson more active and get them engaged.

Today’s lesson for me was a maths lesson with Year 4. Overall, I am really pleased with how the lesson went and how much the children took away from this lesson. The children are learning about subtraction from decomposition and I chose to teach this in a way of telling a story and then doing a worksheet. I was concerned about the children not being active do also added in a short activity including the children answering the questions and getting into a line at the end. I have marked their written work which will be included in my placement folder for confidentiality purposes as well as a very positive evaluation sheet from the class teacher about my lesson.

Individual Lesson Plan Format (Primary)

Class/Group: Year 4                         Lesson: Mathematics                       Date: 27.04.17

  Previous Experience

Children have done previous work on mental and written subtraction in previous terms

 
  Working towards outcomes of a National Curriculum

Pupils should be taught to: subtract numbers with up to 4 digits using the formal written methods of columnar subtraction where appropriate

 
  Literacy/Numeracy/ICT/HWB (where appropriate):  
  Learning Intentions Success Criteria  
To use compact decomposition to subtract 3 and 4 digit numbers from 4 digit numbers I can use compact decomposition to subtract 3 and 4 digit numbers from 4 digit numbers  
  Resources Whiteboards, smartboard, pens, worksheets, pencils, rubbers, post it notes, question cards  
  Timing   Assessment methods  
   6 mins

 

5 mins

 

5 mins

20 mins

 

3 mins

 

20 mins

5 mins

Total

70 mins

 

Setting the context/Beginning the lesson (Introduction)

Give the children a question on the board (6273-4528) and give them each a post it note and some time to answer question. Answer at the end

Teaching the learning intentions (Development)

Explain the Everest “story” using the class whiteboard to draw on.

Have the children with individual whiteboards in pair answer the question 8848-453m using compact decomposition. Write the answer on the board as the children answer the questions given.

Continue with the whiteboards for subtracting 8848-985m if the balcony was lower down. Discuss this.

Children will then do the Everest camp worksheet in pairs putting names at the top. Timer on board. Another similar worksheet available if children finish early.

Tidy up from this and get out whiteboards

Play the silent game where the children have to answer questions and get into a number line – game must be silent and they must help each other

 

Ending the lesson (Plenary)

Answer the question set at the start on a ‘post it’ note.  Stick on board and review – did class agree

 

Question and Answer

Question and Answer

 

 

Teacher Marking

 

 

 

 

 

 

Observation

 

 

 

Question and Answer

 
Success Criteria Results Next steps for the children
The children all responded well to the compact decomposition strategy with most getting all of the answers correct for each activity. Children 1, 7 and 13 were unable to complete the first activity and were allowed to continue it during the second activity. Even when getting the extra time, the same children got answers wrong, which could be down to the questions or them not being confident in using this technique. Children 1, 7 and 13 need to continue to work with the compact decomposition strategy, possibly even with easier questions of only 2/3 digits.

I am confident for all other children to move on to harder subtraction questions, possibly even with 5 digits.

EVALUATING MY PRACTICE
Going well (what worked and why?)

The lesson overall went really well with children listening well and there were no behavioural issues. This was most likely down to the amount of activities going on in this fast paced lesson, which allowed the children to be constantly busy and active.

Most children engaged well with the story which I think is possibly down to me telling the story in a fun way, allowing the children to come up to the board and draw things on themselves.

I had planned this lesson well so knew exactly when I should do things and how to start it off. )

Areas for development (what didn’t work and why?I sent all the children to go up to get their books at once, which was a mistake as it caused a lot of chaos at the desks. I should have allowed them to go up one at a time or for one child from each table to go up to hand out the books.
Next Steps for Me

In future I will be more aware of what the children have already learned in maths lessons and the way they describe certain methods in mathematics. I will also remember to send children up one at a time or one from each table to get books etc.

 

Humanities Lesson Year 3

Image taken from google

Todays lesson was my first proper lesson here at Moulsford so I was a little nervous to say the least! The boys are lovely and I am getting to know them really well as I am with this class often and the class teacher is really supportive. My lesson was on rivers, the planning is first and then official evaluation of the lesson below. The class teacher did observe me which did not worry me and they also gave me some really positive feedback. This will be included in my placement folder.

Individual Lesson Plan Format (Primary)

Class/Group: Year 3                                   Lesson: Humanities                                               Date: 28.04.17
Previous Experience

Children will have identified major capital cities in Britain, rivers and landmarks and completed a worksheet on flags and saints.

Working towards outcomes of a National Curriculum

Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and

their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features

(including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand

how some of these aspects have changed over time.

Literacy/Numeracy/ICT/HWB (where appropriate):

Literacy – writing on and reading the worksheets, ICT – Looking Oxon and Berks on google earth

Learning Intentions
Success Criteria
To know where Oxon and Berks are in Britain

To know their addresses

To know where the river Thames is in Britain

I know where Oxon and Berks are in Britain

I am able to write out my address

I know where the river Thames is in Britain

Resources
Pencils, Pens/pencils, Computer, Smartboard, Worksheets, Internet, maps, humanities books, glue, projector, online timer
Timing
Assessment Methods
 

 

 

 

6 mins

 

 

 

 

 

15 mins

 

 

3 mins

 

 

4 mins

 

 

2 mins

 

6 mins

 

 

 

 

 

4 mins

Total

50 mins

Setting the context/ Beginning the lesson (Introduction)

 

Open lesson by discussing with the children about where they live, what their home county is called and zooming in to Oxon and Berks on google maps

 

 

Teaching the learning intentions (Development)

 

After opener, hand out the worksheets and humanities books to the children to complete and then glue into their books. Put a timer on the board. I and teacher will help any children who do not know their addresses.

 

Hand out the Thames worksheets. As a class, look at the map of the major rivers of England and discuss which the children have visited or heard of.

 

Have the children each read out a fact about the river Thames.

 

Children to glue sheets into their humanities books.

 

Children to complete Thames missing word worksheet and any other uncompleted work from their other worksheet.

 

 

Ending the lesson (Plenary)

 

In the children’s jotters write down 3 stars and a wish underneath worksheets – 3 things the children understood and 1 thing they need to improve from today’s lesson

 

 

 

 

Question and Answer

 

 

Observation and Teacher Marking

Question and Answer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher Marking

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher Marking

Success Criteria Results Next steps for the children
After questioning the children at the end of the lesson it was clear to see that the children are confident in their knowledge that they know where Oxon and Berks are in Britain. Very few of the children knew their addresses and needed a lot of help during the lesson. Child 3,5,7,8 and 9 didn’t know any of their address whilst children 6,10,11,12 and 16 knew confidently part of their address (e.g. house/street name or village) but nothing else. All other children were unable to write any part of their address and expressed this as a wish in the plenary. The children know where the river Thames is in Britain after discussions with them and looking at their plenaries. The children will continue to learn about rivers with a closer look at how they are formed and why they are important. The year group will also go on a school trip to a rivers museum.

Children 3,5,6,7,8,9,10,12 and 16 would benefit from a lot more work on learning their addresses and this could be done in language lessons when looking at letter writing.

EVALUATING MY PRACTICE
Going well (what worked and why?)

The children overall really enjoyed the work they did on Google earth and I was able to gauge their attention throughout the whole part of this lesson. There were no behaviour issues throughout the lesson which was a definite positive for me and I believe this is due to my planning where because I knew what I was doing and when, I was keeping the lesson fast paced and snappy.

The boys also expressed the fact that they liked the plenary and they filled this out very well and I have some excellent assessments due to this.

My timing was good and I was able to start and finish at the times I had set out.

Areas for development (what didn’t work and why?)

I found that the children at one stage were finding some of the questions I was giving them too difficult and they were starting to get fidgety because they didn’t know their address and there was only 1 sheet of paper with their addresses on. In future I would possibly put all of the addresses on the smartboard to save myself going round all the boys giving them their addresses.

I am from Scotland and there for my go to knowledge is not usually about Oxon and Berks so some words I was pronouncing wrong where the teacher had to correct me. I think I would in future revise the topic more, or maybe ask the class teacher about pronunciations just to be certain.

Next Steps for Me

I will absolutely be doing two stars and a wish again after the excellent reception it got as it is a quick plenary that the children enjoyed.

Next time I will be more careful about where in the classroom I position myself, because I should have all of the children in my line of view which I didn’t at points today. Although this was not an issue today, I am very aware that in the future it could be with a different class in terms of behaviour.

The children I work with in this Year are young and therefore work better in pairs. In my next lesson I will try to incorporate more peer assessment and team work.

Pupil Participation

Image from google images – the boys all wear badges similar to these

I was lucky enough to be invited to attend a pupil council meeting and see how Moulsford run their meetings. A boy from each class showed up including the pre-prep classes, the head boys, the headmaster and the deputy head (pastoral). All the boys were wearing pins to show their status as a pupil council member and patiently, quietly waited for the headmaster to call them into his office to begin the meeting – which impressed me a lot. A chair (one of the boys) had already been appointed and throughout the meeting ran through each of the items on the list which ranged from cups in the canteen to sporting opportunities to a skate park on the grounds. Each point was discussed and supported by the headmaster and the deputy head (pastoral) no matter how big or small the matter or how silly it was either. A lot of the time it was suggested that if the matter in hand was a possibility it would need to be run by the bursar before any final decisions were made on the matter, but no idea was ever shot down. Nothing point was rushed through and every suggestion was treated as a democracy with the headmaster suggesting the pupil council take a vote on the matter if there was a lot of debate.

It became clear to me throughout the meeting that the pupil council is taken very seriously in the school by the way the children’s opinions and suggestions were carefully taken into consideration and the way the boys acted during the meeting. However, the more research I did, the more I realised this is not something which is special for Moulsford. The Department of Education in England is supportive for all schools to have structures similar to pupil councils in place which can allow pupils to discuss the issues that affect them and hear their opinions. Moreover, Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) states clearly that children and young people should have a say in decisions that affect their lives and by having a pupil council, Moulsford are clearly doing this. The experience of sitting in on a pupil council meeting has definitely showed me the importance of listening to your pupils in a school and is something which I feel all schools should have.

Image from google images