Tag: programmabledevices

MICROBIT

MICRO:BIT

micro:bit Educational Foundation

The micro:bit Educational Foundation (@microbit_edu) is a UK-based not for profit organisation with a mission to ‘inspire every child to create their best digital future’. We help children participate in the digital world, with particular focus on girls and those from disadvantaged groups. We work in collaboration with educators to create and curate exceptional curriculum materials, training programmes, classroom tools and free resources.

The micro:bit

The micro:bit is a very small but functional computer. It has a range of inputs, outputs and sensors built-in. It can be programmed using blocks of code or JavaScript text-based code (you can even write your code in one format and convert it to the other!) on the Microsoft MakeCode site.

Programmable devices can be an excellent way to engage learners with a hands-on experience of coding, which is an abstract concept.

Here is an example of a micro:bit in action:

This is the front view of the original micro:bit (v1)t

This is the back view of the original micro:bit (v1)

This is the front view of the new micro:bit (v2)

This is the back view of the new micro:bit (v2)

MICRO:BIT ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

OTHER MICRO:BIT POSTS

The Micro:bit Educational Foundation are looking for primary school (second level) teachers from Scotland to take part in a piece of research about their experiences… Read more

PASSWORD GENERATOR MICROBIT LESSON

micro:bit have created this series of three lessons (designed for learners aged 11-14 years) to introduce cyber security. Learners explore the need to create strong… Read more

Microsoft MakeCode for micro:bit This site from Microsoft offers projects to get you started with your micro:bit computer – it also has an online micro:bit… Read more

sphero robot

SPHERO

Sphero (@SpheroEdu) is a range of programmable robots, often spherical in shape, that can be remote controlled or programmed with code.
Programmable devices can be an excellent way to engage learners with a hands-on experience of coding, which is an abstract concept.

Here is an example of a Sphero in action:

The learners in this video were challenged to make the Sphero follow a ‘fairway’ route on a golf course floormat. They had to measure the distance of each straight, the angle of any turns and then create an algorithm for the Sphero to follow the path and reach the ‘hole’. There was lots of trial and error involved in getting the right speed and duration for the Sphero movement blocks but they all got there in the end – even if some were over-par! This learning involved an application of maths skills and understanding, along with some new computational thinking and programming ones.

OTHER SPHERO POSTS

by Laura Di Pasquale, Wellshot Primary School, (@LauraKeeney01) Due to the upcoming COP26 taking place in Glasgow, the Apple Regional Training Centre Glasgow is driving… Read more