Burravoe Primary School

Otter Tracks and Signs

| 2 Comments

on the 06/07/17, mum, my brother and I, went to the Ulsta pier, next to the ferry terminal. we waited for every body to come, then a man came he told us he was called Rory, It was very exciting.

 

Fun Facts that you need to know about if you’re looking for otters

  • Otters have bad eyesight but they can smell you and hear you very well, so you have to check the wind so that if the otter is in front of you,and the wind is blowing in your face, then the otter won’t smell you because your smell goes with the wind.
  • You had to wear  natural sort of colours so the otter wouldn’t notice anything colourful, bright and unusual.
  • Otters live in old rabbit burrows and make the holes a bit bigger so that they could fit in them.
  • If otters catch small fish, they stay where they are and eat it there and if they catch big prey then they come to the shore and eat it there.
  • Otters only come when it’s low tide so its easier for them to get crabs and different shellfish, so it’s better to come and look 3h before low tide.

 

Facts about otter poo

  • Otters poo is called spraint.
  • Other otters can find out what gender was the otter and what age it was from the, otter poo that, that otter made.
  • If you wan’t to look for an otter, you might need to look for fresh spraint, because if there’s fresh otter poo, that means that the otter was there recently, fresh otter poo looks wet and black and old spraint is white and dry.

 

Later on we actually saw an otter! It caught a big prey so it swam up to the shore to eat it, we had to be really quiet and be as still as we could manage, so we would not scare away the otter, I had a look through Rory’s big telescope, the otter was eating some kind of white fish, I enjoyed learning about how to find otters,  and also looking at a real otter.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


2 Comments

  1. Wow! Amazing. You are really lucky. I’ve always wanted to see an otter. I’ll be keeping my eye out for fresh poo from now on.

  2. Thank you so much for posting about this and sharing what you learned – it sounds as if it was an amazing experience especially being able to see the otter really well through a good telescope. Great photos too!

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *.


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Report a Glow concern  Cookie policy  Privacy policy

Glow Blogs uses cookies to enhance your experience on our service. By using this service or closing this message you consent to our use of those cookies. Please read our Cookie Policy.

Close