Tag Archives: resources

Safer Internet Day 2019

This year’s Safer Internet Day has the theme “together for a better internet”. On the website there are resource packs available for all age groups, from 4-18. The resources include videos, assemblies, and various activities for children and young people to do.

In line with the theme of making the internet a better place, there are a couple of great resources that are moving away from the “e-safety” model to more of a “digital citizenship” approach, and encouraging young people to make the most of the opportunities technology provides.

BBC Own It has the awesome tagline “be the boss of your online life” and is aimed at 8-12 year olds. As well as advice about dealing with bullying and so on, it has lots of information about developing digital skills and creativity. It has a “friendly older sibling” feel to it, with lots of videos by YouTubers.

Google’s Be Internet Legends is aimed at 7-11 year olds. It includes the “Interland” game, resources for teachers and parents.

Both BBC Own It and Be Internet Legends are available for free online and can be accessed directly or via the tiles on Glow.

 

Last year’s Safer Internet Day post is still available, with lots of links to more resources!

Digital Learning and Data Protection

Digital tools for learning and teaching

In Stirling Council schools and nurseries, we use a variety of digital tools for learning and teaching, to share information about the life of the school, communicate with parents and carers, and to celebrate success. Use of many of these tools requires sharing some personal data about children with the providers of the services. This may include, for example, children’s names, classes, and Glow or Stirlingschools.net email addresses. For some services, we will need consent of parents and carers to share this personal data.

Core digital services

Across Stirling Council, we use Glow and Google’s G Suite for Education for learning and teaching. Data is shared with these services under the legal basis of public task – use of these services is deemed essential for learning and teaching, and we have legal agreements in place with both Education Scotland and Google to ensure that personal data is kept safe (see our Privacy Notices below for our use of these services).

Privacy notice for Glow

Privacy notice for G-suite

Privacy policies for services within Glow:

Glow’s own Privacy Policy

Glow has a number of National Apps, information about which can be found here. Their privacy policies are listed below.

Books for All

Languages on Screen

Screening Shorts

SCEL framework (staff only)

Scholar

RM Blogs

RM People Directory

RM Community

Likewise, Seemis is used to securely manage children and young people’s personal data, including sensitive category data (such as information about their health). This data sharing is also done under the legal basis of public task, and appropriate agreements are in place to ensure the data is securely managed.

Other digital services

For other processes involving digital tools, schools may use the legal basis of either Public Task or Consent for data sharing, depending on how much data is shared and the purposes for which this takes place. Where  necessary, they will seek consent of parents/carers and the young people themselves when they are aged 12 and over.

 

 

Coding resources for early years and primary

There has been a flurry of interest in coding and computational thinking at Early, First and Second level since the publication of the new Technologies Experiences and Outcomes. This post is an attempt to signpost some of the great resources that I have found out about recently.

The Stirling High School Learning Community is taking part in a pilot project with SSERC to develop coding mentors within each nursery and primary school, working closely with secondary computing colleagues. A lot of the resources I’m about to mention were demonstrated in the two CLPL sessions we have had with SSERC so far; the others I found out about yesterday at the Learning Through Technology conference!

Teachers’ Guide for Early Years and Primary

Firstly, if you’ve not already seen it: TeachCS.Scot. This website is the home of a fantastic teachers’ guide that links the Es and Os to the benchmarks and has lots and lots of suggestions and links to resources.

Coding Unplugged

Create-A-Face is a great activity where pupils use “if” statements to program a robot face.

The fantastic Jam Sandwich Bot activity involves using commands to program a person acting as a robot to make the perfect jam sandwich.

One of these teachers is actually a jam sandwich robot…

Marching Orders requires one partner to follow instructions precisely to recreate an image the other partner can see. For extra challenge try it with the Doodle Monsters!

If, like me, you are a big Pirates of the Caribbean fan, then you will appreciate the Treasure Maps activity. There is another version (with video) here.

Ozobots

Ozobots are little robots that follow a line drawn on paper and can be programmed using different combinations of colours.

An ozobot in action!

The ozobot in STEM page has resources for teachers, and Ozoblockly can be used to program the ozobots using block programming.

Programming on iPads

One of the workshops I attended at the Learning Through Technology conference was the excellent Mission to Mars, which introduced me to the Tynker iPad app. This can be used for block coding and also as an introduction to Swift. Another app to try is Swift Playgrounds.

I also got to have a go with a Sphero robot. These are more expensive than the ozobots, but they can be programmed using either Tynker or the Sphero Edu app. Plus, they contain sensors that can be used for investigations and experiments. AND you can get a BB8 Sphero robot. What’s not to love?

Finally, check out the iBook store for a number of resources for teachers, including Get Started With Code 1 and 2, and Learn to Code 1 and 2.

Technologies Professional Learning Community

Networking and sharing resources with other teachers is perhaps the most valuable form of professional learning, particularly in a subject like Computing Science, which is ever-changing!

The Glow Technologies Professional Learning Community is a great place for primary and secondary teachers alike to find and share resources and advice. Really worth checking out for any teacher grappling with the subject! It also contains useful links and lots of resources about computational thinking.

It’s not all about computing, however! Teachers of any of the technical subjects can find help and resources here.