Calling out for peace

The terrible news of the terrorist attack in Paris on Friday 13th November will not be new to many people. It is a story that has really struck a chord with me and makes me question; what kind of world are we living in? When innocent lives are being taken, and for what?

One of the biggest outcries on social media over the last couple of days has been the need to highlight more of these tragedies that different countries, around the world, are facing everyday. Just today there was another attack, this time in Kenya. (See article below)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-32169080

How are we now meant to move on as a society? What can we do to make a difference? And, most importantly, how can we as teachers address such serious issues in the classroom? It can be difficult to know where to start and whether or not children are ready to hear about some of the horror stories we are subject to every single day.

I think it is really important that, from an early age, children understand that violence is not the answer to solving problems. It always amazes me that people think that the way to achieve peace is through war. If people had the ability to see past hatred and violence and focused on loving one another then the world would be a much safer and happier place. This is a message that is important to share with children as we want future generations to live in peace. Psychologist, Marshall Rosenberg, has a very interesting take on the topic of ‘Compassionate Communication’ which I encourage you to read:

https://www.nwcompass.org/compassionate_communication.html

Another issue that has been raised after the recent terrorist attacks is the increase in Islamicphobia. I find it absolutely ridiculous that people are blaming all Muslims for the actions of a minority group who practise the same religion. This is why it is vital to teach religious education in schools, to help children understand that there are always going to be stigmas attached to certain religions but that doesn’t make all those who practise that religion bad people.

One way of helping children to understand such big issues is through music. There are so many beautiful and meaningful songs that really get the simple message across that it is important to strive for peace. Some examples of simple songs that can be used in the primary school are in the links below.

Overall, I think it is important that we inform children of world issues when they are at a stage of development when they are not going to just feel scared about these stories but will actually be able to communicate how they feel about the issues. It is important that we don’t cause them to live in fear but encourage each individual to make a difference. Something as simple as a session on reflective writing, poetry or through song could be a really effective lesson to cover some of the harder topics that are important to address.

2 thoughts on “Calling out for peace

  1. M MackieM Mackie

    I love your comment about music! Music is an area of the curriculum which (I feel) does not get as much attention as it should. Perhaps this links into the hierarchy of subjects…? I believe that allowing children to work through feelings and emotions using music and arts can help them to have a better understanding of themselves and of the world around them. As you said; communication is key to combatting fear, and where some children might feel confident to express themselves through writing and words, it is really important that we provide these alternative options.

    Reply
    1. Rachel Billes Post author

      I completely agree with what you’re saying. Music has played such a huge part in my own upbringing and I think it is vital that all children have the same opportunities as I have had, to explore their talents in this area but more importantly how it makes them feel.

      Reply

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