What’s your brain like? (hwb)

Suzanne Zeedyk- ‘Pre-birth to three: Importance of early years’ 

The 8 minute video on the importance of early years was short but very impactful. It made me think of what environment children come from and that each child is unique in their own way. Cultures in every aspect of the world are different which creates such a diverse humanity from languages to learning techniques and styles.

What does this mean for primary practitioners? – My thoughts on how the importance of early years will affect primary practitioners is a great deal. Each child within your care is entitled to a safe, nurturing environment in which they can learn and succeed. Some cases in Home life (which the video highlighted) children are subject to abuse, malnutrition and lack of their needs being met. From a young age they are looking for where their next threat may come from instead of exploring new environments such as the way a ball moves or developing gross motor skills. This can affect how they may be in a school environment, they will be cautious and unsure on how to interact with others. They may have a lot going on in their mind on deciding whether or not a child or adult is a threat, and in turn will be affecting their learning, as their concentration will be on the threat being made (or not). Due to their home environment children will have different expierences and emotion towards subjects, such as a child may have extremely out going parents and has been around the world and expierenced different cultures in societies, giving them a different expectation and view on what the world will be like, compared to a child who has only had the opportunity to explore their back garden and surrounding areas. As spoken about in the video by Suzanne, this develops each child’s characteristics and how they develop and learn further, in turn creating who they will be in adolesence and even in full developed adulthood. As practitioners we should be encouraging children to risk take and try new expierences (bearing in mind age and stage appropriate) giving the children a development of their five senses and how it can impact them in a world. What might they think of a smell? What might they see differently to everyone else in class? How might they react to tasting something from a different culture. As practitioners we need to remember that if a child is going through a tough time at home, their concentration and sitting skills may not be there as their brain is focusing on something different, and stress levels may still be high from morning expierences at home. It’s about looking at how to help that child develop and grow in their own way, helping them in a safe, nurturing environment which a classroom should be, in where they can develop and grow further, and have expierences in which they may not receive at home.

What impact will the importance of early years have on professional practice? – Early Years will have a significant impact on professional practice as a child is still developing until the age of 20. The brain is able to react in different situations from a young age, and expierences help development and growth. Stimulating and challenging exercises within school from different parts of the curriculum help children reach their full potential in a safe and secure environment where they are surrounded by friends and children their age. From a young age children’s expierences are important and within the school setting we should developing them further and helping them become the best person they can be in the future giving them the tools to succeed. It is important to remember each child is different and their brains will react differently to situations given to them. Creating a positive working ethos and finding out within the classroom environment on the different styles children learn and adapting lessons to help meet their needs. As each child is brought up differently, and as practitioners we should be encouraging them to succeed, but also be mindful and respectful of their needs, and come up with lessons to meet their needs.

“What kind of brain are we asking children to develop?” – Suzanne Zeedyk

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