The work of the National CPD Team

This is a cross post from the National CPD Team blog http://ltsblogs.org.uk/cpdteam/2010/09/17/the-national-cpdteam/

The National CPD Team in Scotland provide strategic support for CPD and PRD throughout Scottish Education. You can find out more about the work of the team by browsing this blog and viewing this short video, which explains what we do, where we started and what are our vision, values and beliefs around CPD.

Please feel free to share it.

What is our aim?

The National CPD Team aims to improve pupil learning by building capacity to implement Curriculum for Excellence at individual, school and authority level.

How do we achieve our aim?

  • by promoting a consistent model of professional learning which draws on a wide range of academic research, and reflects the values implicit in Teaching Scotland’s Future
  • by supporting the development of structures for CPD that focus on improving the quality of teaching and of school leadership
  • by working with our partners (through the CPD Network ) to a maintain a high profile for CPD among educators

 Who’s in the team?

The current team consists of:

So what is it we do?

Our team plan (due for completion in September 2011) will give you a flavour of our current activities:

We have initiated and/or continue to support a number of key projects including:

If you want to know more

The Importance of Teaching

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/eOrderingDownload/CM-7980.pdf

This publication offers interesting insights into the future direction of the English school system. There is I think much to reflect on in terms of the relevance and likely impact of some of the proposals it contains.

The White Paper begins by confirming that “the first, and most important, lesson is that no education system can be better than the quality of its teachers” but notes that while the system is improving, it is not matching, nor keeping up with, the performance of other countries. It says that “our school system performs well below its potential and can improve significantly”.

The White Paper outlines wide-ranging and significant strategies that will be taken to deliver the required improvement. For example, there is a commitment to:

  • free teachers from constraint, ”helping them to learn from one another and from proven best practice, rather than ceaselessly directing them to follow centralised Government initiatives.”
  • free schools from external control and “hold them effectively to account for the results they achieve”
  • reform teacher training by increasing the time spent in classrooms, focussed on core skills
  • develop a network of “Teaching Schools” to lead teacher and headteacher training
  • “Sharply reduce the bureaucratic burden on schools, cutting away unnecessary duties, processes, guidance and requirements, so that schools are free to focus on doing what is right for the children and young people in their care.” 
  • Increase teacher authority to search pupils, issue same day detentions and use “reasonable force where necessary”
  • review the National curriculum to reduce prescription and allow schools to decide how to teach
  • ensure that exam standards meet the highest international standards
  • raise the age of participation in education and training to 18 by 2015
  • help every school who wishes to enjoy greater freedom to achieve Academy status, to support schools as “autonomous institutions collaborating with each other on terms set by teachers, not bureaucrats”
  • reform OFSTED inspection, “so that inspectors spend more time in the classroom and focus on key issues of educational effectiveness, rather than the long list of issues they are currently required to consider.”
  • end the current centralised target-setting process, increase the number of head teachers of excellent schools committed to supporting other schools – and develop Teaching Schools to make sure that every school has access to highly effective professional development support.
  • Radically reform the funding model to make it more transparent, fairer and progressive

Lots of interesting ideas to discuss in our staffrooms!

Choinneamhan / GaelMeets

Gus comharrachadh gu bheil coimhearsnachd leasachadh leantaineach proifeiseanta, Dachaidh, ga chur air bhog, tha sgioba na Gàidhlig aig Foghlam Alba toilichte innse gu bheil sreath de choinneamhan air-loidhne gu bhith air an cumail.

Bithear a’ beachdachadh air iomadach cuspair a bhiodh inntinneach do luchd-teagaisg anns an fharsaingeachd agus chan ann do luchd-teagaisg na Gàidhlig a-mhàin. Bidh cuid dhe na seiseanan air an lìbhrigeadh tro mheadhan na Beurla, cuid tro mheadan na Gàidhlig agus feadhainn eile le measgachadh dhen dà chànan.

Bidh Coinneamh 1 a’ dèiligeadh le Measadh. Bidh a’ choinneamh seo ann am Beurla agus bidh Maureen Martin bho Foghlam Alba a’ toirt an fhiosrachaidh a th’ aice fhèin air a’ chuspair. Bidh a h-uile gin dhe na coinneamhan ann an Gàidhlig air Dachaigh air an stiùireadh le Gillebrìde Mac ’IlleMhaoil.

Gus a dhol an sàs ann an Dachaigh, theirig gu http://bit.ly/dachaigh . Gus clàrachadh airson Coinneamh 1, theirig gu http://bit.ly/gaelmeet1  agus coimhead airson a’ bhutain airson clàrachadh.

To celebrate the launch of its online CPD community, Dachaigh, the Gaelic team in Education Scotland are pleased to announce the start of a series of online CPD seminars, GaelMeets.

These will tackle a number of topics of interest to many, not just Gaelic, educators. Some of the sessions will be Gaelic, some in English and some a bit of both!

GaelMeet 1 is the first of three on assessment. This GaelMeet will be in English and features Lorraine Facchini of Education Scotland. All of the GaelMeets will be facilitated by Gillebride MacIllemhaoil, the facilitator for the Gaelic Education CPD community  on Glow, Dachaigh

To join Dachaigh, visit this link http://bit.ly/dachaigh.  To sign up for GaelMeet 1, visit this link http://bit.ly/gaelmeet1  and look for the enrol button.

Primary/Secondary transition project

Passport to Europe  
This three-part resources provides reading, writing, speaking and listening tasks on weather, clothes, numbers, times on the clock, places in the town, rooms in the house, personal language and animals. They contain materials for a fun day event for Primary 7 pupils but many of the games and materials provided are suitable for use in the MLPS classroom
French
German
Spanish

Senior Phase Timetabling

Curriculum for Excellence Timetable development – Summary

Introduction
Four curricular models on the Education Scotland website were developed further with possible timetables for 2014/14; viz. Kirkland High School, Clydebank High School, Charleston Academy and Balfron High School.

Key Points
• All models built upon a well-considered and well developed model for the Broad General Education phase building on the guidance in BtC3.
• All models reported that timetabling of innovative curriculum structures to support CfE did not require any new or specialised timetabling skills
• Although the BGE phase plans were different to previous S1-S3 models and from each other they all allowed suitable progression and transition to the senior phase for all learners.
• The models varied in period number and length.
• All models were developed using traditional timetabling methods:
-development of a curricular model or map
-departmental and staffing capacity calculated
-teaching period and accommodation calculated
-timetable worked up
• All models effectively considered S4 – 6 as a single cohort
• All models provided one or two year courses for learners and offered a substantial degree of flexibility with vertical and horizontal progression

Key Considerations
• All models reported some specific difficulties regarding the incorporation of Health and Wellbeing, Physical education and support into their timetables and further consideration will need to be given to these areas
• All models mentioned the importance of partnership working with schools, colleges and other partners to develop meaningful senior phase opportunities for pupils and there are implications for timetabling around this including blocking to suit college times, consortia arrangements etc.
• Advance planning at this stage (2011) is highly recommended as various staffing and accommodation issues were identified which can be planned for in advance of 2014
• Consideration needs to be made at this stage for the transition years from 2013/14 into 2014/15
• There was some discussion in the models about possible occasional suspension of the timetable at points to help deliver some aspects of CfE and there was also some consideration being given to changing the timetable during the year.
• There were some concerns expressed about 2 year courses – specifically for S6.Some consideration needs to be given to this.

Reflective questions
• Do you have a sound curricular plan on which you can begin to develop a timetable for your senior phase model?
• Have you considered how to provide for Health and Wellbeing, PE and support?
• How strong are your partnership arrangements and how can these partners be involved in developing the curricular plan and a timetable?
• Is your planning early enough to cope with the transition year?