Tag Archives: #resources

Boosting young people’s employability through LifeSkills

‘LifeSkills created with Barclays’ is a free employability programme for 11-24 year olds and we’re thrilled that, to date, we’ve had 5 million young people participate in the programme. Now we’re excited to announce two new initiatives that celebrate the achievements of young people, schools and colleges in their bids to boost career prospects.

What is LifeSkills?
Back in 2013, LifeSkills was launched to support educators address the growing skills gap amongst their students and face the youth employability challenge head on. Developed with educators across all four nations, LifeSkills strives to support educators develop young people’s employability skills through free, curriculum linked education content.
Through lesson plans, interactive challenges, videos and quick-fire activities, as well as student work placements opportunities and sending Barclays volunteers into the classroom, we want to help to bring  career education to life.

What does LifeSkills deliver?                                                                                    LifeSkills covers a range of different themes that all support young people get the skills they need to move forward from education into the 21st century workplace, including building resilience, learning to be a problem solving pro, becoming an expert communicator and mastering money management.

LifeSkills and the Career Education Standard
To make teachers’ lives as easy as possible, we ensure our content is aligned with the Career Education Standard’s goal of improving ‘young people’s ability to make informed decisions about future pathways’.   In particular, throughout the resources we look at how we can fulfil the following criteria highlighted within the standard:

• engage young people in meaningful discussion about their skills development
• develop their understanding of the responsibilities and duties placed on employers and employees
• facilitate young people’s learning and their ability to engage with a rapidly developing landscape of work/career and learning opportunities

Greg Leighton, an employability support officer in Glasgow and member of the LifeSkills Educator Advisory Council is passionate about the programme, stating ‘It’s no longer just about qualifications. Young people now, more than ever, need softer skills like confidence and communication, alongside relevant experience, to meet the demands of a changing world of work. LifeSkills resources are comprehensive, easy to use and essential in helping young people to realise and fulfil their true potential.’
But it doesn’t end there. Now we’re taking the programme to the next level.

LifeSkills Champions
Launched in October, LifeSkills Champions offers young people the chance to gain valuable recognition for boosting their own and their peers’ employability skills through LifeSkills. If you work in education, you can nominate anyone aged 14-19 to become a LifeSkills Champion.
Once nominated, young people are tasked with delivering a series of LifeSkills sessions to their peers. From CV writing to interview preparation, networking best practice and more, the sessions cover core skills and competencies that are essential to employers. What’s more, they’ll be supported along the way with a toolkit, packed full of tips and videos from LifeSkills Ambassadors. When their designated activities have been completed and approved, they’ll receive a ‘LifeSkills created with Barclays’ digital badge to help demonstrate to prospective employers that they’ve got the skills to take on new challenges, act as a leader and motivate others.

The LifeSkills Award
Going hand in hand with LifeSkills Champions is the LifeSkills Award. This recognises schools and colleges which are going above and beyond to support their students to gain the skills they need for better futures using LifeSkills. We know there are so many schools and colleges out there doing amazing work to set their students up for success by embedding LifeSkills across their whole institution, and we want to make sure they’re getting the recognition they deserve. Successful applicants will receive certification that demonstrates their institution’s commitment to championing young people’s employability locally and nationally, as well as to regulators and parents.
You can find out more about these two initiatives, alongside a wealth of free employability skills resources, at barclayslifeskills.com/teachers.

New Road Safety Resources

Road Safety Scotland have developed a suite of free road safety learning resources for specific age groups from 3-18 years, with a view to developing responsible road use among young people. All their resources link to Curriculum for Excellence, incorporating experiences and outcomes in health and wellbeing; literacy and English; maths and numeracy, and many other subject areas.

The resources offer different learning styles to engage teachers and learners, and make the learning appropriate, relevant and challenging at every level, and may also help maintain the important link between school and home, allowing key road safety messages to be shared throughout the wider community. You can now access the online resources through the App Library available in Glow.

Career Education Standard (3-18): Exemplification Tool offers a ‘helping hand’

ces-exemplification-toolThis tool will support practitioners in planning and developing new practice in career education  and to reflect on existing practice.   Based on the ‘I can’ statements in the Career Education Standard (3-18) it provides illustrations of what children and young people might experience in order to help them meet their entitlements.  For ease of reference the entitlements have been appended to the resource and linked to each theme.  The tool  supports  practitioners  to consider what  career education might look like in their own particular contexts and to plan accordingly.

Structure

The exemplification tool groups the entitlements and the illustrative  ‘I can statements’ in five themes and by levels.  Alongside these are suggestions of the types of activities that children and young people might experience as they work towards their entitlements.

The themes are :

  1. Exploring the concept of work (from simulated experiences to the world of work)
  2. Expanding horizons and ambitions
  3. Diversity and equity
  4. Seeking help and information
  5. Finding a route to work

Down load the exemplification tool here:

Use the following infographisc to bring the  10 entitlements to life: https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/eslb/files/2018/03/Infographic-entitlements.pdf

 

Illustrations of how education establishments have implemented DYW across the curriculum can be found on the Education Scotland National Improvement Hub.

Barefoot Computing Resources

Small- Barefoot ImageJoin us on Monday 23rd May at 4pm for a fun session introducing the changes to the Technologies curriculum and the principles of computational thinking and programming.

We will explore the free Barefoot Computing resources, including excellent classroom activities that will save planning time and get teachers and pupils excited about computing. Free posters and sample activities will be available for you to download and we will also provide you with a simple presentation that you can use to quickly and effectively introduce your colleagues to key computing science concepts and approaches.

The session is aimed at Primary teachers and digital leads and the aim of the session is provide teachers with the tools and confidence to support their colleagues in delivering the new computing science significant aspects of learning.

Register now to join us live in Glow TV – Barefoot Computing Resources.

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Education Scotland’s DYW resource – a summary

RoadmapSince the implementation of Scotland’s Youth Employment Strategy in response to the recommendations put forward by the Commission for Developing the Young Workforce in September 2014 Education Scotland has publish a number of key documents and related resources to support practitioners in realising the ambitions around DYW.  Here is an overview which aims to help navigation and access:

Key documents:

Reviews and reports:

DYW Information Update:           DYW Information Update -Aug 17 provides an overview of the entire DYW programme.

Implementation overview of the 5 DYW Change Themes for the rest of the programme duration:

Related Resources (on the new National Improvement Hub):

Interesting Practice exemplars (collated):

A series of interesting practice examples are being published on the National Improvement Hub. The  following ones are currently available:

Equalities and inclusion

The following links provides a number of resources and links to help practitioners identify and tackle issues of gender stereotyping in their classrooms and schools:     Improving gender balance 3-18

More information can be found on the National Improvement Hub and the Education Scotland website.

DYW Skills 3-18 Website, Blog and E-bulletin

You also find this information as well as links to  additional materials and partner organisations within the dyw-flyer-feb-17

 

A Guide to Cyber Security Programmes and Resources for Schools and Further Education Providers

cyber

Cyber security is a hot topic, both at a global level – new cyber attacks on businesses, Government and consumers are reported daily – and in the every-day lives of children and young people, who are regularly confronted with risks to their online safety. The new computing curriculum aims to equip children and young people with the skills they need to participate effectively in the digital world. Good cyber security is essential to this. The website provides links to a variety of sources and programmes related to Cyber Security. Though the programmes are linked mostly to the English Curriculum teachers may find the information useful a similar link to resources in Scotland will be produced in due course.

 

Career Education Standard – Learning Resources: An SDS update

CES Learning resMarie Lloyd works in Organisational Development at Skills Development Scotland and is part of a team working with Education Scotland to develop Career-long Professional Learning (CLPL) modules built around the Career Education Standard:  “We all want young people to go on to fulfilling careers when they leave school.

Every day, through Curriculum for Excellence young people are learning skills for life and work. Supported by teachers and practitioners like you, they are making connections between what they learn in the classroom and how it applies to the world of work.

You are their support and Skills Development Scotland can be yours.

We are working closely with Education Scotland to develop a series of professional learning resources linked directly to the Career Education Standard. These will help you develop and maintain your awareness of the labour market, different learning and career pathways and the employability skills young people need to develop.

Whether you’re working at a nursery, in a primary or secondary setting, at a college, as a private training provider, a social worker, as part of the third sector or community learning and development, or in a specialist learning or residential setting – these resources are for you.

You can now access the first of what will be a suite of four modules through Education Scotland’s website.

It will help you to understand the purpose and aim of the Career Education Standard, the entitlements for children and young people and the role you’re expected to play along with parents and partners.

Two further modules will be added in April.

The first looks at Labour Market Information (LMI), the facts and figures that show us where job opportunities will be, and in what sectors in Scotland. For example, LMI tells us a predicted 11,000 BBC Make it Digitalnew jobs will open up each year until 2020 in Scotland’s digital technology sector. The module will provide you with an understanding of LMI, how to access it, how to use it in the classroom and the benefits it brings for a young person’s learning.

The second is on Career Management Skills (CMS). These are the skills that young people need to help them make informed career decisions throughout their lives. SDS Careers Advisers focus on identifying an individual’s career management skills, and those they need to develop further, during coaching sessions. These are also skills that can and should be developed across the curriculum as a day-to-day aspect of learning.

Homepage 1By the end of May the fourth and final resource will look at My World of Work and the resources it offers teachers and practitioners. My World of Work is already widely used by pastoral care and guidance staff but this resource will explore how all teachers can use it to access valuable information about learning and career pathways and the current and future labour market.

These four learning resources can be used independently, relatively informally with a small group of self-selected colleagues or more formally as part of an agreed area for improvement across a department or the whole school.

Through this process of awareness-raising and individual or collaborative reflection, we hope you will be better able to consider how the entitlements and expectations described in the Career Education Standard relate to your current practice and better equip you to more fully integrate learning about the world of work into your lessons in a way that is proportionate, manageable and sustainable.”

Skills Development Scotland supports the implementation of the Career Education Standard – by Ken Edwards

The Career Education Standard is going to make it easier for you to Career Education Standardweave career education progressively through the curriculum from 3 to 18.

Published in September 2015, the Standard addresses the ambition to reduce youth unemployment by better preparing young people for the world of work and is a direct response to one of the recommendations in Education Working for All! The standard reflects existing Curriculum for Excellence guidance; most obviously, in relation to Building the Curriculum 4: Skills for learning, life and work but also in delivering some of the health and wellbeing outcomes that are, of course, the responsibility of all.

At the heart of the new Standard lies a set of entitlements for all learners and a corresponding set of expectations for each of the four key influencers in young peoples’ learning and career choices: you as teachers or education practitioners; parents and carers; employers and, of course, Skills Development Scotland (SDS) the national skills PWP_2897agency.

I know from previous experience that the landscape of Scottish education can sometimes appear cluttered with seemingly unconnected new initiatives that compete for limited development time. Therefore, it’s heartening to know that as schools begin to deliver the entitlements and expectations described in this new Standard it will also help them address some of the other current priorities in Scottish education.

A significant body of research shows more systematic and progressive delivery of quality career education works on two fronts. Firstly it helps young people to develop the essential career management skills needed to successfully navigate the increasingly complex and extended transition from school into further learning, training or employment. Secondly, it has more immediate positive impacts by helping to set learning in a relevant real-life context so raising learners’ engagement and motivation. In turn, this leads to measurable improvements in achievement and attainment and makes a valuable contribution to closing the attainment gap. All of which are priorities in Scottish Government’s new National Improvement Framework.

Support for you

The Career Education Standard acknowledges and builds on the existing good practice seen in classrooms across Scotland and aspires to make this common practice in future.

Fortunately, with such an ambition, you are not alone in implementing the Standard. SDS and other partners are working hard to provide additional guidance and support to help you develop young people’s skills for life and work and so ensure that DYW sustainably improves learning experiences and outcomes for all.

SDS’s team of expert Careers Advisers have started working with pupils from an earlier stage; beginning at the point of transition from P7 to S1 and continuing to be involved at all stages until the end of school. They offer a combination of group and one-to-one activities geared to developing the essential career management skills that help young people make informed learning and career choices providing a valuable complement to school career education programmes. We have been working in close collaboration with Education Scotland and a number of primary, secondary and additional support needs schools across Scotland to develop, test and refine this support.

We know young people are going online for information and help. Only last week Childwise figures showed 7-16 year olds are spending 3 hours a day on line, that’s up to 4.8 hours for 15 to 16 year olds. This growing trend coincides with the news that SDS’s digital resource is already being significantly enhanced, with more on the way.   This includes the updated and more intuitive version of My World of Work, our award-winning careers information and advice web service, which launched on 25 January.

There will also be a new dedicated digital offer aimed at CfE second level (P5-7) and an exploration of how P7 pupils can best use My World of Work. These digital resources are accompanied by a range of support materials that can help teachers and pupils to better connect learning in and beyond the classroom to the world of work.

SDS is also working to enhance practitioners’ confidence and skills in the area of career education. We are working with Education Scotland to develop a suite of learning resources that will support career-long professional learning. These will be gradually rolled out over the coming months and will focus on getting to know the Standard, how to make effective use of My World of Work, career management skills and also an insight into career and labour market intelligence and how to access current information.

SDS will also be able to further support schools in engaging and working with employers, and along with the National Parent Forum of Scotland have already developed a guide for parents to career education in schools.

Coming up

Over the coming months you’ll hear more from my colleagues in SDS on each of these areas and the progress that’s being made.

In March we’ll update you on the launch of the re-developed My World of Work and the new and improved tools and content as well as plans for the future.’

Useful Links

Read the Career Education Standard

Find out more about Skills Development Scotland

Get the help you need for the career you want at My World of Work

See the National Parent Forum of Scotland nutshell guide Career Education: A World of Possibilities

Building the Curriculum 4

Education Working for All!

 

Thinking Global about Social Enterprise? – new resource pack

logo--hi-res…. then you might be interested in the new Social Enterprise Resource Pack developed by the British Council,  Social Enterprise Academy (SEA) and Real Ideas Organisation (RIO) helping teachers to deliver activities and lessons on social enterprise.

Written in clear English and aimed at students aged 7-14, the resource pack is suitable for any educator – no previous experience of social enterprise is needed – and is designed to help achieve key teaching objectives, promote valuable skills and enrich the quality of education in schools.   It also offers advice on how to use the content in an international school partnership and how to find a partner school.

The pack contains six principal lesson plans as well as suggestions for activities in the classroom and community. The activities spur students to think about social problems in their localities and further afield and the role that businesses and social enterprises can play in addressing them. As the lessons progress, students working in groups develop a business plan for their own social enterprise and the most promising of these plans is turned into a real social enterprise.

One example highlighted in the pack is the partnership between Bishopbriggs Academy in East Dunbartonshire and the Karma Project in India whose privately funded school provides free education for 70 children who would not otherwise receive it.

 

For more information please visit:  https://schoolsonline.britishcouncil.org/classroom-resources/list/social-enterprise

For more enterprising ideas, resources and case studies go to Scotland’s Enterprising Schools

Glow App Library NEW! – Scottish Book Trust

SBT LogoA new tile has been added to the National Glow App Library by the Scottish Book Trust.

Use it to browse through hundreds of reading and writing resources and take part in Scottish Book Trust’s fantastic projects!

You can add this free tile to your ‘My Launchpad’ for easy access to it at all times. To add an app or tile to your Launchpad(s) you may find the following video useful – Adding Tiles to a Glow Launchpad.