Tag Archives: Professional Learning

New release: Review of the implementation of the Career Education Standard (3-18), the Work Placement Standard and Guidance on School/Employer Partnerships

Education Scotland has undertaken a national review on the implementation of the Career Education Standard (3-18) since its release in September 2015.  This  also incorporates reflections on the Work Placements Standard and School/Employer Partnership Guidance.  The report outlines  key strengths identified as part of the review process, exemplifies creativity, innovation and impact and highlights areas of development. We are now working with local authorities across Scotland to identify next steps in how best to support the implementation of the CES 3-18 and enhance embedding the new standards around work placements and school-employer partnerships.

The standards and the guidance were published with the understanding that Education Scotland would evaluate the impact the documents were having, in light of experience and use.  In response a team from Education Scotland visited 29 secondary schools between December 2016 and March 2017. The evidence from nine secondary school inspections and 30 Career Information Advice and Guidance (CIAG) reviews also recorded evidence about the implementation of the standards in secondary schools.  An online survey was established to maximise the participation of as many people and organisations as possible for the review.  In addition, a bespoke survey for employers, delivered on behalf of Education Scotland by the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), attracted further responses. Questions on the review of the standards and guidance were also included in the annual Skills Development Scotland (SDS) Headteachers’ survey.

In summary, the purpose of the review was to ascertain answers to the following questions:

  1. To what extent have the standards and guidance been implemented and has the pace of implementation been sufficient in order to direct the next stage of activity and focus? There was a particular focus on the CES and how it was being implemented in secondary schools, alongside the expansion of the SDS service offer.
  2. Are the standards and guidance ambitious enough to deliver the aspirations of the DYW strategy?

You can access the complete CES Implementation Review – report May 2017.

Professional Learning for Teachers of Gaelic Medium Education (GME)

Streap, the Postgraduate Teaching Certificate for teachers of GME will start on 4 September 2017There are a limited number of places available. An induction event takes place in Glasgow on 14 and 15 September 2017.  There is now a Facebook page relating to this professional learning.   Please contact Margaret.ford@highland.gov.uk for more information. This programme is currently fully funded by the Scottish Government.  For more information, please visit:

http://www.abdn.ac.uk/education/degrees-programmes/gaelic-medium-education-pgcert-436.php

 

 

Career Education Standard 3-18: Parents are key influencers when it comes to career choices

ken-edwardsBy Ken Edwards, Education Programme Lead, Skills Development Scotland

‘The most important supporters and the greatest influencers of children and young people’s learning and career choices are their parents or carers.

They help their children by encouraging them to think and talk about their strengths, skills and interests; to be open minded and ambitious when exploring learning and career pathways; to be well informed when making choices and to be resourceful and resilient in overcoming challenges.  The support of parents has never been more important than now.    The growth in technology and globalisation drive an ever more dynamic and competitive labour market, one for which we need to prepare all young people.

Fortunately, to help busy parents with their important role, Skills Development Scotland (SDS) provides a rich source of direct support and easily accessible information.

SDS has careers advisers providing free, impartial careers advice and guidance in every single state secondary school in Scotland.

In the last year that programme of support has been extended in line with expectations in the Career Education Standard.

The parents and carers of all young people in S2 or S3 who are making their first Senior Phase subject choices will be invited to join their child in the face-to-face meeting with a careers adviser. If that doesn’t suit, they can see the adviser on their own to discuss the options for their child, helping them to better support the young person as they make informed decisions about their future.

SDS careers advisers will attend school events for parents of children at every stage from P7/S1 transition to S6.

In some areas, the flexible partnership approach SDS takes with schools has led to the hosting of bespoke events for parents and carers.

Online, My World of Work has an area dedicated to helping parents and carers, accessible 24 hours a day for free.

Topics covered include how to support a child making subject choices, course choices, exploring options for after a child leaves school, managing exam stress, funding, applications and apprenticeships.

SDS also works with a range of partners who support parents and carers. Once again, we are working with the National Parent Forum Scotland to develop further ‘nutshell’ guides as a follow-up to Career Education: A World of Possibilities

Written by parents, for parents, the new ‘nutshells’ will look to support parents and carers to have productive career conversations with their children, cover creativity, enterprise and employability, apprenticeships and opportunities in the growing digital sector.

SDS is also in the second year of its partnership with the Scottish Parent Teacher Council to pilot Partnership Schools Scotland (PSS).

This project offers a model for school, family and community partnership.

Its uniquely Scottish approach is based on the work of the National Network of Partnership Schools developed and fine-tuned over almost 30 years in the USA.

PSS is progressing well with some 40 schools in five local authorities now involved and examples of interesting practice developing.

SDS is commited to continuing to work for and with parents to help them be the confident source of support their children need to be ambitious in successfully identifying and following their chosen learning and career paths.’

 

See the SDS interactive guide to careers services in schools

 

What keeps you sharp? Over 40 this is for you

what-keeps-you-sharp

What Keeps You Sharp? survey launched

People often think of changes in their thinking skills with age in terms of decline. While some people do experience these changes, others do not.

What Keeps You Sharp? is a nationwide survey being led by researchers at Heriot-Watt University about your beliefs and attitudes to how thinking skills might change with age. They  also want to know if you think there are things we can do to maintain or improve thinking skills as we grow older.

If you’re aged 40 or over and living in the UK you can complete the survey online: http://tinyurl.com/keepingsharp.

 Help  spread the word

They  want to reach as broad an audience as possible, so share within your own networks – email lists, Facebook and other social media.

Anyone on social media can share the links  from @TheAgeingLab and the hashtag #WhatKeepsYouSharp?

Please share the survey among your friends and family and any groups you might be associated with.

Helping you to help pupils make subject to career connections

sharon-orourkeSharon O’Rourke, Skills Development Scotland

Helping young people make connections between what they are learning in classrooms and the world of work they’ll enter when they leave school has been brought into sharp focus by Building the Curriculum 4, the Career Education Standard and of course, Developing the Young Workforce.

Embedding career information and advice web service My World of Work into lessons, using SDS’s newly developed ‘lesson inserts’, is our way of helping you to make that connection for young people without needing to be a career expert yourself.

What are lesson inserts?

Lesson inserts are our answer to the common pupil question ‘why are we doing this?’

Co-created with teachers, for teachers, these are short, easy-to-use and adaptable activities, linking curriculum topics to careers by using the wealth of information on My World of Work.

The lesson inserts use the ‘plan on a page’ format. All essential information is in one place, brief and to the point, so you don’t need a lot of preparation time to use them; just pick it up and it’s ready to go. They are also flexible enough for teachers to expand or shorten the activities to meet the needs of their lesson.

How it works in practice

The short activities set out a range of ways to help young people make career connections.

These could be links to a job profile or film lasting only a few minutes featuring a person working in a certain career. For example during a biology lesson on dissection, a link to the job profile for a pathologist has a handy video showing the job in action.

Alternatively, individual or group exercises can encourage deeper careers research by perhaps asking pupils to complete a quiz or worksheet which requires searching My World of Work for the answers.

Or perhaps the activity might be given as homework to pupils to research jobs on My World of Work that are related to your subject with an action to discuss any common skills across them all in your next lesson.

At Whitburn Academy, Computing Science teachers are using the lesson inserts to show pupils and their parents how vital the subject is across a variety of careers. They are designing activities that mix careers research with practical programming activities to show the link to modern day jobs, such as Web or Games design, as well as the part programming plays in more traditional trades, such as electrician. This encourages young people to understand the breadth of opportunity their subject offers.  The teachers used the subject choice tool to research careers information for their lesson inserts, which they said increased their confidence to promote the subject in school and at parents’ evenings.

Keeping it current

As you know, My World of Work is part of the range of support on offer from Skills Development Scotland.

The information it holds is regularly updated, ensuring pupils are always accessing the most up-to-date information possible.

Using links to My World of Work helps young people develop career management skills and widens their career horizons as they become more informed about the career choices available to them.

Using My World of Work also provides the opportunity for teachers to build their career intelligence, whilst increasing their knowledge of what’s available on the site from the perspective, not just of a teacher, but as an individual, and perhaps as a parent as well.

Get Involved

We are still early in the process of creating lesson inserts, and are keen to work with teachers across all subjects to create more.

Examples of the lesson inserts that have recently been developed with teachers can be found in the partner area of My World of Work.

If you’re not registered or haven’t used the range of resources we have for teachers on My World of Work, why not sign up as a partner today and get involved?

The partner development and integration (PD&I) team at SDS are here to support you every step of the way. We really believe that these lesson inserts can be a useful, inspiring tool to support learning in your classroom.

We all want to see young people go on to successful and fulfilling careers when they leave school.

These lesson inserts are another way for us all to support them to do just that.

If you’d like to get involved email sharon.orourke@sds.co.uk

SLF 2016: DYW and skills featured highly!

slf2016_162The SLF is over for another year and what a great 2 days it was! More than 4500 delegates enjoyed a wide variety of professional learning opportunities on offer from the 110 conference sessions and more than 175 exhibitors.  All the keynote sessions were recorded and are available to watch on our YouTube channel.

With 18 directly related seminars, two discussion sessions and explicit references in the keynote address by the Depute First Minister, Mr Swinney, DYW was again high on the agenda at this year’s  festival.  Some of the content will be available via our interesting prcaskieberran-psactice exemplars (see eg. Caskieberran Primary School) .

Planning for SLF 2017 is already underway so make sure you save the dates in your diary, Wednesday 20 and Thursday 21 September 2017! If you have any feedback on this year’s event send us an email.

Leadership Award: Gaelic Education

Social Enterprise Academy, with support from Education Scotland and Bòrd na Gàidhlig, are delivering an Institute of Leadership and Management Award for teachers of Gaelic Education. The next Leadership Award for Gaelic Education will commence on 11 and 12 November  2016.  If you wish to enrol for this award, or require more information, please contact kate@socialenterprise.academy.

 

EU Report: Youth work’s contribution to aid transition from education into employment

EU youth work and employabilityThe contribution of youth work to address the challenges young people are facing, in particular the transition from education to employment.

The Report presents results from the work of the expert group set up under the European Union Work Plan for Youth for 2014-2015.

The findings detail the role of youth work and its specific contribution to addressing the challenges young people face, in particular the transition from education to employment. The report seeks to make employers, Public Employment Services and policy-makers aware of the crucial role youth work can play – either as a lead agency or in partnership with others – in supporting the employment and employability of young people. In this context, youth work is defined as ‘actions directed towards young people regarding activities where they take part voluntarily, designed for supporting their personal and social development through non-formal and informal learning’.

BBC News: Career talks ‘boost future earnings’ – research

PWP_2629Career education given to pupils in secondary school can be linked to higher earnings in adult life,  according to the latest research highlighted in a BBC News report.

A study published in the Journal of Education and Work suggests that better-informed teenagers are likely to make more advantageous career choices.

It measures the earnings benefit as an extra £2,000 per year for every six careers sessions when aged 14 to 15.

Researchers used the British Cohort Study tracking 17,000 people.

The research, commissioned by the Education and Employers charity, found that once other factors were taken into account, such as exam results and economic background, there were higher earnings for those who had received sustained careers advice in school.

The study, by Christian Percy and Elnaz Kashefpakdela from the University of Bath, used data from the British Cohort Study which has been tracking the health, wealth and education of people since 1970.

It concluded that there was a long-lasting employment impact from careers talks and lessons.

Where there were “higher levels of employer contacts, in the form of careers talks with outside speakers”, researchers found that this was linked to higher returns in the labour market.

They concluded that getting careers information and meeting employers in school had a “meaningful and statistically significant impact on later earnings”.

Anthony Mann, director of policy and research for Education and Employers, said: “Other well-known studies have highlighted the benefits of employer engagement, but never before have we had such a robust analysis drawing on such rich data.”

Nick Soar, head teacher at Bishop Challoner Catholic Federation in east London, backed the benefits of outside speakers from industry.

“The pupils love it. They ask endless questions and you can see it really brings home to them what they need to do to succeed in the workplace,” he said.

CBI president Paul Drechsler said: “This report makes clear the importance and impact of great careers insights and advice from people in the business world.”

Andreas Schleicher, the OECD’s education director, said the study provided evidence for how “career education translates into measurable earnings advantages”.

Education and Childcare Minister Sam Gyimah said the research “provides further evidence of the positive impact an employer can have on a young person’s future career”.

Scottish Guidance Association: Annual Workshop Day

We are pleased to bring you this year’s SGA Workshop Day, which will be held on Saturday 5th March 2015, from 09.30–15.30, at the Carnegie Conference Centre, Halbeath, Dunfermline. This event is open to everyone involved in the education of pupils. Following the keynote speech from Mairi Thomson and Ken Edwards, you will attend 3 workshops outlined in the Workshop Day Brochure 2016. To book your place, please click here. It is also possible to use the Workshop Day Booking Form 2016

If you are not already a member of the SGA, and would like to take advantage of the £10 discount (usual price £100), you can join by using the Membership tab on the website—membership is free.

If you don’t like the idea of an early commute on a Saturday morning, why not stay overnight at the Holiday Inn Express, which is right next door? A special rate of £66 is available for Carnegie events, though the cost is often considerably lower.

We are sure you will enjoy the day.