Tag Archives: Outdoor Learning

DYW and Outdoor Learning

At Castlemilk Day Nursery DYW features as an integral part of the learning and teaching alongside literacy, numeracy and health & wellbeing. The Nursery employs a variety of approaches to allow their children to link the skills they are developing to the world of work, challenging gender stereotyping alongside.

Through outdoor learning children at Nursery have opportunity to explore and develop a wide variety of transferable skills across all curriculum areas. Using for example prompt cards and key questions children become aware of key professions and the skills required for these . This is reinforced through our joint up ventures with business and other local nurseries, primary and secondary schools. The Nursery is looking to promote skills for work, life and learning through role-playing , currently they have a focus on the veterinary sector. Children undertake a variety of roles and this helps them to understand the range of different skills that are necessary in the world of work.

Central to embedding DYW across all aspects of learning was the engagement of staff in professional dialogue and partnership working with employers. The Head Teacher and the staff have been working on resources that ensure that the Career Education Standards 3-18 is embedded within the curriculum.

Job Profile

A key priority of the nursery was to support children’s knowledge and understanding of the skills they were learning and relating these to the world of work The skills that the children explored are:

Responsibility/thinking

Teamwork/leadership

Creativity/self confidence

Physical wellbeing

Resilience

These where broken down into achievable “I can” statements for children and linked to the Career Education Standards 3-18. Staff had previously taken part in outdoor training within the local community woods and shared photographs of the learning with the children. The children were encouraged to share the skills that they could identify which included “helping”, “showing” and “talking” and relate these to their daily nursery routine and the wider world of work.. This was a shared learning approach which had positive implications for both staff and children’s learning. The nursery has taken the first steps to building on employee partnerships, developing the young workforce through joined up ventures and sustaining lifelong learning for all. The children really enjoy outdoors and the benefits which it brings. Having a woodland area within our nursery outdoor area we have been able to support and enhance the learning opportunities to support developing the young force through the children’s newly acquired transferable skills.

Staff and children have the opportunity to look at various experiences and outcomes through interdisciplinary learning. Skills for learning, life and work is an integral part of the planning and this ensures these are embedded within the curriculum experiences. Castlemilk has now made contact with wider industries such as house builders, catering agencies, generation programmes and engineering companies who are willing to support in sharing skills with our children

Castlemilk Day Nursery will continue to develop the young workforce approach within their daily practice and within their planning. They will work on joined up ventures with local nurseries, primaries, secondary schools and other education providers sharing skills and knowledge. This will support their children in developing their skills and open up many opportunities to embed DYW within the learning and teaching of the nursery.

Transferable skills and DYW

Karen Henderson, Head Teacher says: “The initial idea came from linking staff CPD training with our community “Wellie Wanders” group which our children take part in weekly. Staff were also able to link their experiences to the “Outdoor learning” documentation and “My world outdoors” resources which are embedded within Castlemilk Day Nursery”

“I liked climbing on the trees with Ella. I climbed really high. Then climbed down again” Josh, age 4yrs

“I learned to build a den with sticks, leaves and tarpaulin. I like playing in the mud. I like everything outside” Tommy, age 4yrs

Yokerburn Early Years

Extended day centre within Yoker area of North West Glasgow. Nursery caters for children from 0–5 years from a multitude of cultural, social, economic and learning backgrounds.

The establishment has been raising awareness of job roles within local community by working with a range of different partners . This inspires the children and provides an early introduction into the world of work.  The children have been working with a local care home to build up confidence and familiarity of the world of work. The children have experienced several different roles within the care home including: nursing, cooking, hair and beauty and table set-up . This is a fantastic opportunity for the children to gain a real insight into the world of work.

The project has grown and the children have had several engagements with the organisation:

Sustainability
They have been working with the care home to grow products. This project is in conjunction with another partner Dumbarton Environmental Trust. The project is helping the children to improve their understanding of science but also introducing a wide range of different career options.

Remembrance Day
They joined the care home residents on Remembrance Day and the children made their own poppies to commemorate the occasion. This was another opportunity for the residents to discuss their own lives with our children.

We have other experiences available to our children:

Parental Employability Sessions
We have encouraged our parents to become involved in our employability events and we have had several successful parental QA sessions. This allows the children to experience these skills from some familiar faces.

Fruit Stall
This project has allowed our children to learn employability skills in a real-life context. The children are involved in all aspects of the enterprise activity and have had hands on experience in the following:

Health and hygiene
Money handling
Stock control

They also produce a survey on what products are selling the best and plan their purchases accordingly.

Community Police Visit
The children had a visit from the community police, this was another opportunity to showcase a positive role model . They had a QA session and had the opportunity to ask a wide range of diverse questions.

“The effective incorporation of simple counting, matching and comparison tasks into the conversation encouraged early numeracy skills and the reciprocal question and answers and new vocabulary in context developed early literacy skills for our children in a real and meaningful way. Our childen have been extremely engaged during visits to Quayside with older residents and we have recognised that often adults can underestimate children’s abilities in terms of empathy and awareness. We have had statements from Quayside about increased motivation, interest and engagement by some residents and there really is an observable connection between the regular visitors. Promoting the world of work is allowing our children to access early knowledge of the wide range of different career pathways. We are building on our local partners and will continue to actively promote the positive impact of early introduction to the world of work” Mary Gallacher, Head Teacher

Next Steps
We will continue to work with local partners and strengthen links with the local community.

“We have noticed a surge of energy and increase in physical activity for some of our residents when they know the children will be visiting” Anne from Quayside

Skills development through outdoor education: Fully funded CPD opportunity

The Outward Bound trust (Loch Eil) is offering a free CPD opportunity to for teachers /practitioners and employers to explore partnership working around skills development and employability .  

During a 2 day seminar the team at Loch Eil will demonstrate how the outdoor context can develop core skills relevant in supporting young people to realise their  future aspirations and career pathway.   The seminar will make reference to skills development in relation to the Career Education Standard, attainment and wider achievement. 

More information about the seminar and how to sign up here.

Contact:

Freda Fallon,

EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS – SCOTLAND

The Outward Bound Trust

Loch Eil Centre, Achdalieu

Fort William, PH33 7NN

T 07919 887716

W outwardbound.org.uk

Also:  Access the Outward Bound interesting practice exemplar here and find out from Ciaran and Skye, pupils at Irvine Royal Academy, Ayrshire, what they had to say about their experience at the Loch Eil Outward Bound Centre

 

Developing essential employability skills through outdoor education

Exposing young people to the outdoors and engaging them in activities that challenge and inspire them has long been highlighted as an important component to support the development of skills for learning, life and work.  Resilience , team building, problem-solving as well as acquiring technical skills  all help when it come to preparing for the world of work.

This has been highlighted by the recent visit of Jamie Hepburn, Scottish Minister for Employability and Training,  to The Outward Bound Trust’s Loch Eil Centre to see for himself how the trust works with young people to help them develop skills which enable them to become workplace-ready.   In his interview to the Scotsman (7 July) he said: “It was fantastic to see The Outward Bound Trust’s work helping young people build their skills and confidence while enjoying the outdoors. This kind of practical training is benefitting Scotland’s workforce and enabling our economy to grow and flourish. That is why we are investing in 30,000 modern apprenticeship starts per year by 2020 and are increasing the number of graduate level and foundation apprenticeships.”

The trust has recently placed even more emphasis on the transition from education to the workplace and to tailoring our offerings to respond to the Developing the Young Workforce agenda. We work with employers to design, develop and deliver courses that address specific workplace needs, such as positive attitudes, communication skills and determination to stay motivated when faced with difficult situations.

Read more at:  http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/building-confidence-and-resilience-a-worthwhile-addition-to-workplace-skills-1-4497523#comments-area

Outward Bound Interesting Practice exemplar

This is what Ciaran and Skye, both from Irvine Royal Academy, North Ayrshire,  had to say had to say after having just completed a 3 week Skills for Life Award course at Trust’s Loch Eil centre:

“From the minute I walked through the door I realised that legacy is a key part of everything you do.  Every decision you make impacts on those around you.”  Skye

 

“To be successful in life I learnt that I must embrace the difference s of people I work with and use them to my advantage.”   Ciaran

 

 

John Muir Award activity with schools 2015-2016

john_muir_way_scotland_10-12-2006The John Muir Award is used to help deliver Curriculum for Excellence outcomes and demonstrates Learning for Sustainability in action. It involves pupils taking responsibility for nature (in school grounds and communities), helps establish aspirations for healthy behaviour, and improves wellbeing in line with Scottish Government SHANARRI indicators. Such activity helps foster a culture of achievement in schools – building essential skills for life, learning and work, and raising attainment for all.

During 2015-2016:

  •  445 schools were involved in delivering the John Muir Award in Scotland (this includes 45% of Secondary Schools, 12% of Primary Schools and 13% of Special Schools)
  •  15,858 Awards were achieved by pupils and staff (15% increase on 2014-15)
  •  3,362 Awards (21%) were achieved by pupils who experience some form of disadvantage

For full report with breakdown of each local authority  see here

Community resilience resources for schools

Want to find out how to prepare for emergencies and keep yourself and other safe? Keep reading and find out how this key message can be used as an exciting approach to teaching and learning.

Download this flyer for exciting ways to integrate flooding, severe weather and other resilience issues into CfE.

CaptureRead these case studies to see what this looks like in practice.

 

 

See at a glance how you can take this forward in the classroom:

Health and Wellbeing – responsibility of all

Are you ready for severe weather, utility failure, flooding or pandemics? Make sure you know whatwhin-park-flooding-sepa to do.  Stay informed, pack a kit, make a plan.

Literacy

Our climate is changing and communities across Scotland are becoming increasingly affected by extreme weather events and flooding which can block roads, destroy homes and lead to loss of power for thousands of people. This can be used as an exciting context for:

  • report writing on the impact of severe weather on daily life in Scotland
  • talk/presentation at assembly and to the whole class
  • debating local issues like flood protection schemes and staying safe in emergencies
  • creating new written texts like an information leaflet or a safety brochure.

Social studies/geography

Are you doing work around natural disasters, weather, land use, map work?

Use community resilience as an exciting approach to cover these topics. By working with local authority resilience professionals you could gain access to information about flood plains, flood protection schemes and other areas of interest in the local area. Local authorities can share data and images from sensors, such as from traffic monitoring, to bring the learning to life in the classroom.  Contact your local authority to discover what may be available to help your school learn about community resilience.

Science

Scotland’s climate is changing as a result of climate change, so we are getting colder and wetter winters and hotter and wetter summers. Use community resilience as an exciting context to explore these issues.

  • explain some of the processes which contribute to climate change
  • consider how climate change influences changes in the atmosphere and then how this impacts on living things
  • investigate how severe weather can affect daily life in short, medium and long term, considering impact on social, economic and cultural life
  • create and use rain gauges as part of a project monitoring and analysing the weather in the local area
  • create anemometers to measure wind speed.

Technology

Use community resilience as an exciting context to:

  • design rain gardens, green roofs, identify ways to harvest rainwater
  • identify the impact, contribution, and relationship of technologies on the environment through flood protection schemes14677863_678528988971564_410767113_o-1
  • design and construct models to illustrate how sustainable urban drainage systems work
  • explore uses of materials
  • create and present weather forecasts based on personal research
  • investigate the impact of severe weather on people, place and the economy, on a local, national or international level.

 Numeracy and mathematics

Community resilience can be used as an exciting context to solve problems using a range of methods, sharing approaches and solutions with others e.g. money, measurement, data and analysis, chance and uncertainty:

  • use digital mapping and other information sources to work out how much salt is required to help clear a surface covered with snow
  • compare and contrast the contracts and cost plans offered by a range of utility companies, and consider how this may be affected by an emergency
  • use outcomes linked to chance and uncertainty to consider the likelihood of another utilities failure happening
  • consider how this may affect insurance premiums.

Ready Scotland Photography Competition 2016

Ready Scotland Photography Competition 2016ready-for-winter-westie

Be prepared for bad weather and win prizes for your school!

What is it?

Ready Scotland Photo and Caption Competition for P6 pupils. Take part in this competition to ensure you and your family are ready for winter!

Action!

We want P6 pupils across Scotland to take a photo which captures how Scotland is ready for winter.  Examples can include:

  • Dogs wearing hi-vis coatscwfrn0gxeaajtlu
  • Weather Signs
  • Flood prevention measures in your local area

In no more than 20 words, please also provide a caption for your image that tells us why it’s important to be prepared for bad weather.

Before you start read this!

Radio can be really helpful in communicating information in an emergency.  Watch this youtube clip to find out how useful people in Chile found the radio during an emergency. Visit Ready Scotland website for more advice on staying safe in Scotland and  complete a family action plan. Visit Ready for Emergencies website for more ideas on staying safe this winter. capture

 

The prize!

The 3 winning schools will receive a wind-up radio for their own grab bags and a behind the scenes experience at their local Bauer network radio station. The Bauer network reaches over 25 million consumers and includes stations like heat, KISS, Magic, Absolute Radio, Forth 1, Clyde 1, Moray Firth, Northsound, Radio Tay, West FM and West Sound. Each school will be able to send 6 pupils to their local station to see what is involved  in creating a radio show and will have the opportunity to try a few of the tricks of the trade.

So have a go!  Win yourself and 5 of your classmates this exciting opportunity!

How to enter:

Each school should attach their top 5 entries as jpg’s to an email and send them to: sde@keepscotlandbeautiful.org

In the text box add:

  • Name of school
  • Full name of pupil
  • Full name of class teacher
  • Caption describing the photo in no more than 20 words

Deadline for entries:

5pm on Thursday 17th November 2016

 

Resilience Week 7th – 11th November

How resilient are you and your family?  What aboutready-for-winter-westie your class? Your colleagues? Are you ready for snow, ice, wind, flooding, rain?  Don’t worry, there are simple steps you can take, some have been listed below.  If you do any of them tweet using #ReadyScotland and encourage others to be resilient too!  For learning journeys and other resources to help deliver lessons in this area you can also visit bit.ly/RfEScot

Snow – keep a blanket, food and water in your car

Ice – identify the stop valve and know how to turn off water

Wind – secure loose objects like garden furniture, trampolines or anything that could get blown around

Flooding – move important documents and valuables to a higher place

Rain – avoid walking or driving through flood water

Visit the http://ReadyScotland.org/ for more advice on being resilient this winter

Contact Eilidh.Soussi@educationscotland.gsi.gov.uk if you or your school are being resilient or for more information

Healthier Routes to School

Sustrans / Go safe Scotland have produced a series of 11 short films to support school travel planning.Healtheir routes

The resource called ‘Healthier Routes’ be found on the GLOW launch pad.

It is aimed at 2nd level pupils and will compliment the work of Junior Road Safety Officers.

A helpful teacher’s guide is also avaiable to support the film resource.

Healthier_Routes_Teacher_Guide