The Kodu Kup is open to anyone from a Scottish school aged between seven and fourteen. Children must be entered as a team of three, forming a mini “game studio”.

Follow @KoduKup on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/KoduKup) to receive regular updates, including dates of free training sessions!

You can download Kodu Game Lab and other useful resources from the Microsoft Partners in Learning website www.pil-network.com. Project Spark can be downloaded from Project Spark

There will be three winning teams in both Primary Secondary sectors. All 6 winning teams will receive a Kinect device, plus a copy of the official Kodu for kids book and a wireless XBOX360 controller with PC USB wireless receiver for their School.

One overall winner will be selected and they will receive the Scottish Kodu Kup and an invitation to present their game to a panel of judges from the games industry at Microsoft Headquarters in Reading. The winners of each category in the UK final will each receive a Surface RT tablet and one overall winning team will take home the UK Kodu Kup! Download more information about the Kodu Cup Scotland 2014


Over the next 4 weeks we are asking you to take part in our great new Paper Creativity Challenge which will involve exploring the properties of digital and physical paper through a variety of different and exciting activities!

We start this challenge on Monday 14th January at 11am with a visit to Dundee Contemporary Arts where we will begin our investigations with a Paper Making Workshop. During this Glow TV event you will learn how to make delicate and wonderful hand made papers from pulps.

Learn simple techniques suitable for using at home such as how to create a smooth surface texture for printing on, soaking and blendng recycled paper, and then also painting with coloured pulp. You can add decorative materials to make designs and also create your own watermark. Join us to learn more about this and then try it out in your own classrooms or homes. Sign up in Glow TV – Paper Making Workshop.

We continue our challenge on Tuesday 15th January with a visit to Bruntsfield Primary School in Edinburgh with Catherine Rayner as she reads her book ‘Ernest’. Meet Ernest who is a rather large moose with a rather large problem. He is so big he can’t fit inside his book! What is a moose to do? Luckily Ernest is also a very determined moose, and he and his little chipmunk friend aren’t going to give up easily. Will they find a way for Ernest to fit in?

During this exciting session you will have the opportunity to read and explore the story of Ernest with early years pupils (approx 20 mins) and then Catherine will work with older children and demonstrate to them how to illustrate texts, in particular Ernest. Ideally learners should have paper and paint so that they can also try the techniques. Sign up and join us in Glow TV – Ernest.

And there is more of this challenge to come! Keep watching this blog and the Glow TV schedule……..

The Scottish Government’s play, talk, read campaign encourages parents and carers to incorporate playing, talking and reading within their daily routines. By playing, talking and reading with their children more often, parents and carers can lay firm foundations for children’s long-term learning, behaviour and life chances.

The play, talk, read website offers a fun, one-stop resource that is easy for parents to use, with lots of handy tips and advice. Digital books, an online community, interactive videos, games and promotions are available for use on the site. Parents can also watch TV advertisements from the campaign and gain top tips and advice from other parents.

Registering with the site allows parents to access a new interactive mobile phone app for parents and children to play together wherever they are. During the game parents are given prompts such as to take turns, and count the bubbles with their child. Having played the game parents are then invited to visit the play, talk, read website for more play ideas.

The app is available for both android and iphones.

STEM Central makes connections between sciences, technologies and mathematics through the context of engineering allows learners to broaden their understanding of the applications of concepts and skills developed in curriculum subjects. It allows learners to develop solutions to problems and demonstrate creativity through inquiry.

We are delighted to annouce that our Games Context for learning is live on STEM Central.

The games industry in Scotland is thriving. Providing jobs for skilled professionals of all nationalities, games companies are at the forefront of Scotland’s electronic technologies and software industry. Games have been used throughout the ages to teach, entertain and amuse. In some respects games have changed over time with changes in technologies, tools and materials, yet in other ways simple games that resemble those from past societies are still played.

In the Games Development Second Level Learning Journey learners are offered stimulating experiences and the opportunity to develop their understanding not only of the history of gaming in Scotland, but will also encourage them to explore technological developments in society, and ultimately how to design, create and market their own game.

The Electrifying Games Second Level Learning Journey offers a range of opportunities for learners enquiry based learning and to develop and apply knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to circuits and components, and to engineering of a 3D game which demonstrates energy transfer and movement.

Click here to visit the new Games Context on STEM Central.

The ICT development team from Aberdeenshire Council was one of the first to engage with the Consolarium and as a result of this a number of games-based learning projects were identified. The idea of using the context of Guitar Hero as the main driving focus in a collaborative story that would enable cross-curricular work was one of the ideas that we wanted to explore.

A Sony PS2, the game and the guitars were placed with a willing teacher in a P7 class after the Easter break. This was the last term for the class so the teacher decided to use this as the main driver for the remainder of the term. Having teenage sons who played the game the teacher quickly became familiar with how it worked and devised a series of tasks that she believed would enable ‘connected learning’ to take place.

We then left the class teacher and the class with the resource and returned in the last week of term to discover a rich seam of creativity, learning and engagement from a class who had lost themselves in the world of rock and roll …

Click here to read the case study.

Nintendogs game for the Nintendo DS, has been used to create a rich, dynamic and inclusive educational context for learners as part of a game-based learning initiative run by Learning and Teaching Scotland and Aberdeenshire Council.

The initiative looks at how the challenging, demanding and appealing world of Nintendogs can help support effective teaching and learning in Curriculum for Excellence.

The initiative provided content for learning in a P2 class. The teachers involved in the initial project and subsequent teachers that have used Nintendogs, made the game the central focus for projects that created connections across learning.

Caring for and nurturing your virtual pet was central to this game. Teachers created purposeful and relevant activities that involved learning in Art & Design. The videos showcase in more detail accounts of what the teachers and the children did and how the game impacted on their learning.

To read this case study click here.

Cross post from the Consolarium Blog.

Over the past few years the Consolarium team has invested in a variety of technical/digital equipment that it wanted to explore in relation to how its effective and innovative use could impact favourably and positively on teaching and learning contexts in settings from 3-18 years.

We have been thinking how best we can utilise this ‘cupboard of super stuff’ and how it can be out in schools helping teachers teach and children learn rather than not doing that! After some thought we came up with the idea of establishing a loan service that Scottish teachers could access via Glow – this is what we are now calling CPDConsolarium. Based on the excellent leading work of Con Morris and the CPDCentral team we have designed a community of practice that aims to act as the focal point for teachers to share their experiences, successes and challenges in using GBL, game design and other technologies in their practice.

We have an inventory of over 220 assets that can be loaned by any teacher that joins CPDConsolarium. Before they do this they must first of all join the community by filling in the online membership form. Once this is done they can then browse the searchable catalogue and see what resources are available and when they can loan them. If a resource is free then a bid is submitted. This is an important part because we are asking teachers to begin to reflect on how they plan to use the resource, what impact they anticipate on learning as well as what it means for their own professional development in relation to how the Standard for Full Registration is being addressed by their work in this area. Once submitted it goes through an approval process which can involve e-mails, phone calls to the school or Twitter DMs by myself to the bidder in order to iron out any problems and to get the resource out to schools.

However, any bid that is accepted comes with a blank wiki page dedicated to that teacher and the resource that they have loaned and an expectation that the developing narrative of their experience will be documented and shared with everyone else. Without agreement to this no kit is sent out.

Some of the kit that is available includes:

  • Sets of Nintendo DS, PSP and a wide variety of games
  • 25 Nintendo Wiis and a wide selection of games
  • 20 Sony PS3s with a wide selection of games
  • 15 Microsoft XBoxes with a range of games
  • 10 Macbooks with I Can Animate & I Can Present installed
  • 10 Graphics Tablets
  • 3D mice
  • Class set of iPod Touches
  • A number of sets of 20 PC Xbox360 controllers for Kodu
  • 2 sets of licences for RPG Maker VX
  • Arduino kits
  • Lego Wedo kits
  • Set of GPS devices
  • and much, much more!

Already the community is growing and we have already approved quite a number of sets of kit.

This resource is here for any Scottish teacher who can access CPDConsolarium with their Glow account. It is our resource, for us to use and to help inform each other of our developing practice. Come and join and empty my cupboard of superb stuff!

Over the past few years the Consolarium team has invested in a variety of technical/digital equipment that it wanted to explore in relation to how its effective and innovative use could impact favourably and positively on teaching and learning contexts in settings from 3-18 years.

We have been thinking how best we can utilise this ‘cupboard of super stuff’ and how it can be out in schools helping teachers teach and children learn rather than not doing that! After some thought we came up with the idea of establishing a loan service that Scottish teachers could access via Glow – this is what we are now calling CPDConsolarium. Based on the excellent leading work of Con Morris and the CPDCentral team we have designed a community of practice that aims to act as the focal point for teachers to share their experiences, successes and challenges in using GBL, game design and other technologies in their practice.

We have an inventory of over 220 assets that can be loaned by any teacher that joins CPDConsolarium. Before they do this they must first of all join the community by filling in the online membership form. Once this is done they can then browse the searchable catalogue and see what resources are available and when they can loan them. If a resource is free then a bid is submitted. This is an important part because we are asking teachers to begin to reflect on how they plan to use the resource, what impact they anticipate on learning as well as what it means for their own professional development in relation to how the Standard for Full Registration is being addressed by their work in this area. Once submitted it goes through an approval process which can involve e-mails, phone calls to the school or Twitter DMs by myself to the bidder in order to iron out any problems and to get the resource out to schools.

However, any bid that is accepted comes with a blank wiki page dedicated to that teacher and the resource that they have loaned and an expectation that the developing narrative of their experience will be documented and shared with everyone else. Without agreement to this no kit is sent out.

Some of the kit that is available includes:

  • Sets of Nintendo DS, PSP and a wide variety of games
  • 25 Nintendo Wiis and a wide selection of games
  • 20 Sony PS3s with a wide selection of games
  • 15 Microsoft XBoxes with a range of games
  • 10 Macbooks with I Can Animate & I Can Present installed
  • 10 Graphics Tablets
  • 3D mice
  • Class set of iPod Touches
  • A number of sets of 20 PC Xbox360 controllers for Kodu
  • 2 sets of licences for RPG Maker VX
  • Arduino kits
  • Lego Wedo kits
  • Set of GPS devices
  • and much, much more!

Already the community is growing and we have already approved quite a number of sets of kit.

This resource is here for any Scottish teacher who can access CPDConsolarium with their Glow account. It is our resource, for us to use and to help inform each other of our developing practice. Come and join and empty my cupboard of superb stuff!

Cross post from Consolarium Blog.

Derek Robertson (Consolarium Team) was contacted by Wilma Leaburn, a QIO from Renfrewshire and invited to a Mario Kart CPD evening at a school in Paisley. A number of teachers had taken this practice forward and a CPD session to share their experiences had been organised. The evening itself was a fantastic example of how creative teachers can be and how, when give the chance, their own idiosyncrasies can lead to wonderful learning experiences that meet the needs of their learners. At this event he met a teacher called Julie Paterson who invited me to Mario Kart open afternoon for parents and carers at her school, Bargarran PS in Erskine.

This series of posts will feature Derek’s observations at this event:

1/4 Driving Learning with Mario Kart: What’s in the box?

2/4 Driving Learning with Mario Kart: The buzz of learning

3/4 Driving learning with Mario Kart: The parents’ perspective

4/4 Driving Learning with Mario Kart: Healthy Eating and Grannie changes her mind

Mario Kart Leaderboards

Myra and Diane from the Early Years team attended  TEACHMEET  at the University of Strathclyde on Wednesday evening. Very inspiring!

We learned about a number of interesting ideas including:

  • 7 things you didn’t know about wikipedia by Ollie Bray
  • Great places to find images by Andrew James
  • User Twitter to enhance CPD by Morven Skinnider
  • Using QR codes by David Muir
  • Digital literacy and moving image education by Jane Thomson
  • The Scottish Book Trust fabulous website by Chris Leslie

Lots of ideas there suitable for Early Years – start exploring!

Click here to find out more about the presentations.

Melissa McClements article in yesterday’s Guardian:
Interactive versions of books for very young children are becoming mainstream. Are they enhancing early reading experience – or diminishing it?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/sep/27/toddler-book-apps

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