Tag Archives: DYW

DYW – Quick Start Guide

The following information outlines the core essentials around DYW, in order to provide a quick overview and introduction to support  planning and implementation.  It includes the following sections:

AWhat is DYW? – Introduction

B.  What are the key priorities? – DYW essential

C.  Key Resources


A.  What is Developing the Young Workforce?

  • Developing the Young Workforce is a seven year programme to reduce youth unemployment by 40% by 2021.
  • The national milestones are set out in Scotland’s Youth Employment Strategy.   
  • The programme is built on the CfE entitlements for children and young people set out in 2008 in Building the Curriculum 3.
  • DYW is a key education policy, as highlighted by John Swinney at consecutive SLF addresses : “Our education policy is enshrined by three major policies, Getting it Right for Every Child, Curriculum for Excellence and Developing Scotland’s Young Workforce.” (SLF 2017)
  • A focus on STEM sits at the heart of DYW. The Digital Learning and Teaching Strategy, Making Maths Count report and  STEM Strategy for Scotland  will contribute useful and relevant insights.
  • DYW has a particular and significant contribution to make in realising the Scottish Attainment Challenge outcomes, in particular priority 4: Improvement in employability skills and sustained, positive school-leaver destinations for all young people.

B.  DYW Essentials:   What are the key DYW priorities ?

  1. The Career Education Standard (CES 3-18):     Read the Career Education Scotland (3-18).  This document contains the key entitlements and expectations around DYW in education and provides guidance for planning and progression.

Reflective question:

  • To what extent am I familiar with the entitlements and expectations outlined within the CES 3-18?
  • To what extent do I use the CES 3-18 to plan relevant and coherent learning experiences?

2. Education -Employer Partnerships:    Establishments need to continue to develop sustainable partnerships with employers, businesses and colleges, which will enable the delivery of meaningful work-related and work-based learning opportunities.

Reflective question:

  • What type of education-employer partnerships do I currently have in place?
  • How do I ensure that these partnerships are effective and sustainable?
  • To what extent do the partnerships contribute to the curriculum design and delivery?

3. Curriculum design:   Embed DYW consistently across all that is planned for children and young people throughout education, ie. within the curriculum,  through interdisciplinary Learning, Personal Learning and Achievement and  the life and ethos of the school as a community.  For more information see Scotland’s Curriculum Refresh Narrative.   Resources for teachers and practitioners can be access on My World of Work.

In secondary schools learner pathways should be planned to reflect the needs and aspirations of young people and offer a diverse range of tailored learning programmes from BGE into the senior phase.  This should draw on a wide range of work-related courses such as Foundation Apprenticeships, Skills for Work modules, HNCs etc delivered in collaboration with colleges, training provides and employers alongside traditional subject choices.

Reflective question

  • How effectively do you plan for career education opportunities and progression pathways for learners in your school?
  • In what ways does the curriculum provision and timetabling in your establishment incorporate career education for all learners?

4.  Connect learning with the world of work:  Whenever relevant learning should be linked to careers, the labour market, employability both theoretically as well as practically.    Education establishments should therefore create work-related learning opportunities for all learners from early years to senior phase.  This may include career insight, work  inspiration, enterprise, simulated  work environments connections.   Work-based learning should be provide to all learners aqs and when required, particularly however in the senior phase.  The implementation of the Work Placement Standard should be an integral element of this.

Reflective question:

  • To what extent do I plan and incorporate work-related learning opportunities across the curriculum
  • To what extent are partners involved in delivering meaningful, work-related experiences for learners,  the delivery of skills and qualifications and highlighting prospective career opportunities?
  • To what extent do all learners our have access to relevant work-based learning experiences and palcements.

5. Improvement Planning:  DYW should be included within the establishment improvement plan and the targets should be realistic and manageable and able to be overtaken in one school year. External partners, such as employers, community learning and development and colleges, and parents should be part of the improvement planning process.  However the voice of young people  should be clear in the establishment improvement plan.   All DYW activity and targets should be clearly focussed on outcomes for learners.

Reflective question:

  • What impact are improvement measures having on learning, success, achievement, confidence, positive destinations and so on?

6. Skills:   There should be a clearer focus on enabling children and young people to recognise and track their own skills development and achievements across their learning.

Reflective Questions:

  •  How effective are profiling processes across the school/establishment?
  • To what extent do I provide opportunities to engage in profiling that supports learning and the development of skills for work and future career choices?
  • How well do I engage children and young people in meaningful discussion about their achievement within and outwith school, the development of their skills and assist them in profiling these to support their career journeys?

7.  Equalities and Inclusion:   Planning for DYW should address issues of equity, equality and inclusion. This includes: addressing parity of esteem across all types of learning and future destinations; challenging gender stereotyping; and meeting the specific needs of young people with additional support needs, from black and minority ethnic communities and those with experience of living in care.

Reflective question:

  • To what extent is our DYW offer inclusive of all learners and challenges stereotypes and bias with regard to gender, race/ethnicity, disability and learners with additional support needs ?

C.  Resources :

Next steps

  • Sign up for Education Scotland’s DYW e-newsletter
  • Find DYW news and information on the Education Scotland Learning Blog
  • Follow us on Twitter, https://twitter.com/ESskills @ESSkills

DYW – Professional Dialogue: Virtual engagement sessions

In order to support your development work and thinking around DYW  we would like to provide you with the opportunity for professional dialogue with colleagues over the coming months.  We have therefore  set up the following 3 virtual workshop sessions (interactive webinars) for you:

1,   DYW – Virtual Drop in session –  4 May (11.00 – 12.30)

This session will allow teachers and practitioners involved in the delivery of DYW to link up with colleagues and share their current development work, discuss challenges and questions and explore ideas.  Register for the event here:   Eventbrite Drop In

2.  DYW – Online Focus session 1:   27 May (11.00 – 12.30)

This session will enable teachers and practitioners to explore key DYW themes collectively.  The workshops will introduce main aspects around selected themes and allow for professional dialogue and enquiry. This will be practical and interactive in nature and include exemplification.  Materials used on the day will be shared with registered practitioners in advance.

Please indicated in the application form  topics you would be most interested in discussion on the day:

  1. Introduction to the Career Education Standard 3-18
  2. Work placements and work-related learning
  3. Embedding skills across learning
  4. Developing effective DYW  School  Partnerships
  5. Data driven dialogue: A process guide to reviewing school/education data
  6. Curriculum design:  Providing diverse learning pathways
  7. Equalities and Inclusion in the context of DYW
  8. Other:  (please specify)

Register for the event here: Eventbrite FS1

3.  DYW – Online Focus session 2:   16 June (10.00 – 11.30) 

The programme of the event follows the structure outlined above.

Register for the event here:  Eventbrite FS 2

 

All registered participants for the above 3sessions will be sent access information closer to the date of the events.

 

DYW – Professional Engagement: Support Offer

In these unprecedented times Education Scotland would like to ensure you continue to receive the professional support you may require around DYW in order to stay ahead of developments.

As current circumstances are unfolding we cannot be certain what the impact will be on the employability prospects of young people from here on in.  However what is already becoming clear is the seismic impact of this current pandemic on the global, national and regional economy. This will undoubtedly refocus the attention on the importance of preparing young people for the entering the labour market, the skills they will require and the steps they need to take to successfully develop their career pathways. This has always been at the core of the DYW programme and we are well placed to build on the structures around career education now in place to re-energise action in this area.

We have therefore put together the following initial offer of key professional online support:

  1.  Online professional dialogue – virtual meetings:  We have set up 3 session for teachers and practitioners to ‘get together’ in order  to share their DYW experiences, exchange information and discuss challenges.
  2.  A quick start guide to DYW:  to help you get to the core issues this section includes the key essential around DYW such as main documents, key links to latest information and updates.
  3.  Professional learning and reflection:  Here you find a selection of  essential tools and learning modules for professional CPD collated in one area.
  4.  Key online resources:  This section contains ideas, resources and exemplars which have been  collated under key themes to plan and develop DYW across learning.
  5. Career, Information, Advice and GuidanceMy World of Work:  This is Skills Development Scotland’s online support hub for teachers and practitioners as well as learners .  It contains classroom resources, Labour Market Information, guidance on Meta – and Career Management Skills amongst a range of other interactive and engaging resources
  6.  National Improvement Hub – DYW  Summary Page:  This website page contains all our resources, tools, exemplification etc. in one place.  .

For more information on the above please follow the links.

If you have any specific questions please don’t hesitate to contact us directly at:  EDSDES@educationscotland.gov.scot

Marine Engineering Workshop

The Marine Engineering STEM Workshop was chosen to receive the Maritime UK STEM Award for 2019. The award recognizes the quality, hard work and dedication of the team in delivering workshops and promoting DYW and STEM as a route into engineering for pupils in schools throughout Scotland. Since starting the program 4 years ago, they have delivered the workshop to more than 26,000 pupils nationwide.

They have developed a new marine environmental engineering workshop that looks at our ocean plastics problem and how students and engineers can help to save our world’s marine wildlife. The workshop culminates in the students building a working submarine with the ability to retrieve materials from the ocean floor.

Their diary is now open for 2020/21/22 and they would like to give all Scottish schools the opportunity to book their free workshop.

MEP JP Buoyancy Workshop Flyer

Developing the Young Workforce – Early Learning & Childcare and Primary Focus

In order to support the implementation of DYW at early learning & childcare and primary school level Education Scotland DYW team are bringing  together teachers, practitioners and DYW leads with experience and interest in this area to participate in workshops. There are three workshops planned in early 2020.

The aims of the workshops are to:

• share current practice and experiences;
• scope requirements to enhance DYW implementation in this area;
• develop support for teachers and practitioners.

We had our first event at the Wolfson Centre in Glasgow in January, over 60 participants collaborated and developed some inspiring ideas to drive DYW in the Early Years and primary sectors.

 

Scotland’s Developing the Young Workforce Programme has been awarded the Future Policy Silver Award 2019

Scotland’s Developing the Young Workforce Programme has been awarded the Future Policy Silver Award 2019 by the World Future Council during the 141st Assembly of the Inter-Parliamentary Union in Belgrade, 16 October. The Future Policy Award is the only global award that recognises policies for the benefit of present and future generations.

The DYW programme has been selected among 67 nominated policies from 36 countries. Also known as “Oscar for Best Policies”, the Future Policy Award highlights the world’s most impactful policies which empower youth. The other winning laws and policies come from Rwanda, Estonia, Nepal, Los Angeles (USA), Senegal, South Africa and Europe.

This is an amazing achievement for the Developing the Young Workforce Programme. It is also a wonderful accolade for all the partner organisations involved and for those at every level in Scotland who have worked tirelessly to tackle youth unemployment, address inequality and develop new pathways to help young people into positive and sustained destinations. Above all, it recognises the success of young people across Scotland who have strived to overcome barriers to employment and have been empowered to develop skills for learning, life and work and to embrace new opportunities and pathways.

A great deal has been achieved and there is much we can be proud of. However, I’m sure you’ll recognise that there is still work for us to do. The next few years will be crucial as we strive to support those young people in Scotland facing the biggest barriers to employment.

 

More information about the award is available from the World Future Council website: https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2019-empowering-youth/

Portlethen Academy: Raising the profile of skills in learning and teaching.

Every classroom has a poster for Skills for Learning, Skills for Life and Skills for Work. Pupil-friendly definitions of these skills were produced by a working group of staff. Teachers are asked to make reference to these skills in their learning intentions and success criteria and in the content of the lesson itself. The impact of DYW is discussed in the videos:

All S1 pupils are recording the development of these skills in a Skills Passport booklet during DCT. The main purpose of the booklet is to help the pupils document the skills they are developing, the subjects in which they use these skills and the evidence they have to support their judgements on how well they are progressing with particular skills in learning, life and work. The booklet also includes sections on profiling, SMART targets, reflection, mental health, recognising wider achievement, subject reports and self-evaluation.

The school has used several key methods to ensure that the strategy has the desired impact to the learners:

  • Researched examples of skills frameworks and received valuable input from Larbert High School after seeing their materials on the National Improvement Hub
  • Decided to develop their version of a skills framework and to link it to their tutor time programme for tracking purposes
  • Established a staff team to develop the framework and materials
  • Introduced the focus on skills to staff at collegiate session.
  • Introduced the focus on skills to pupils at year group assemblies.
  • Produced a set of posters for every classroom
  • Obtained feedback on reference to skills for learning, life and work through pupil focus groups where 5 pupils are selected from various year groups once a week.

The school believes that the changes have impacted on their learners, the key indicators:

  • Promoted skills development in learning and teaching
  • Ensure staff are consistently embedding skills development in their classroom practice
  • Ensure pupils know what skills they possess
  • Helping pupils develop the ability to confidently articulate the skills they are developing
  • Ensure pupils can utilise these skills across different subject areas
  • Ensure pupils realise the value and importance of skills they develop in school and how these relate to the world of work

This is a journey for staff and young people, the key points are:

  • Staff are referencing skills development in their lesson planning
  • Pupils are noticing the increased focus on skills and realising the value as they progress through the school
  • Pupils are becoming more aware of how often they are using different skills
  • Pupils are realising the value of transferrable skills
  • Pupils are realising the importance of skills for their future careers

It has allowed them to monitor it through their focus groups, and they can reference it more easily due to the visual nature of their posters. When they have speakers or reference areas of employment in their career of the week they ensure skills are highlighted.

Portlethen are working hard on partnership and engagement with industry. Curricular experiences through DYW include:

Breadth of careers
Mock interviews
Rural skills
Air traffic control
NHS
Enterprise day (S2)
Micro Tyco
MWOW ambassadors
Hospitality (chef of the week, Royal navy chefs)

Porthlethen see DYW as integral and underpin out their work with young people by making the links between skills and the workplace. They refer to the school as just another workplace, which reinforces the link between education and skills for work. The skills framework has helped by providing a clear focus.

  • Having a visual display of the skills you are focusing on
  • Reference skills in all aspects of the lesson where appropriate
  • Help pupils realise the range of skills they possess
  • Ensure pupils know which skills they are developing
  • Help pupils transfer these skills to different contexts and subject areas

Next Steps
They have started formally recording and documenting skills development and progression in S1. They are looking at creative ways to record and document skills development as the cohort become more mature and progress through the school. They will formalise the inclusion of skills development in lesson planning, learning intentions and success criteria to ensure a consistent approach by all staff.

“I like the framework because I can click on it and see what it means” S1 pupil

“Having the framework on your website helped me link my presentation to the skills required to work in the catering industry in a way that pupils could understand”  DYW presenter.

“The framework diagrams give me a key point of reference in planning lessons and for reference in class.” Teacher

Scottish Learning Festival 2019 DYW Workshops

The conference, organised by Education Scotland, boasts over 100 seminars and a fantastic line up of keynote speakers and opportunities for professional networking.

With a combination of top quality keynote speakers, interactive seminars and the ever popular exhibition, SLF is the ideal place to share thinking and discuss education.

Dates
25-26 September 2019

Information about this year’s DYW themed workshops can be found in the DYW-Flyer-SLF1 and in the summary below:

A whole school approach to developing and applying skills in problem based learning

Improving Gender Balance: Promoting equity through exploring gender stereotypes

Belonging, Believing, Achieving

Leadership for all to facilitate deep involvement in the life of the school and community, empowering learners to embed skills in a real life context

Recognising Wider Learning and Achievement – supporting equity and employability

Implementing a My World of Work profile to help young people showcase their skills and achievements
Education and Skills Committee
Empowering pupils to inspire others: A case study of STEM
Delivering skills for work – Laboratory Science in schools & colleges
Understand the learners: Use their motivations and aspirations to shape the curriculum

Attending the event supports your career long professional learning by helping to keep your professional practice fresh, up-to-date and relevant. You can also find opportunities to discover innovative practice, new resources and exchange knowledge and ideas with thousands of professional colleagues and experts.

Scottish Traditional Building Forum Workshops

Secondary pupils from schools in Glasgow, Stirling, Perth and Edinburgh took part in traditional building skills event held at  various locations.

The hands-on practical workshops provided 13 to 15 year olds with the chance to discover more about traditional skills apprenticeships, and allowed them to have a go for themselves.

They tried their hand at stonemasonry roof slating, joinery and painting and decorating, expertly assisted by current Modern Apprentices in these trades. The event was hugely valuable in raising the profile of the vital skills needed to maintain our unique built heritage.

This is the calendar of events for the next few months:

13 & 14 May

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration outside Edinburgh City Chambers

17 & 18 May

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration at STEM at The Helix

18 & 29 May

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration outside the Scottish Parliament

3 & 4 June

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration outside Glasgow Cathedral Square

20 to 23 June

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration at the Royal Highland Show, Ingliston

19 to 22 August

Edinburgh Traditional Building Festival (part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe)

23 & 24 September

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration at Perth City Centre

The events are organised by the Scottish Traditional Building Forum as part of Construction Scotland’s, Inspiring Construction programme. It is supported by a range of partners including CITB, City of Glasgow College, West College Scotland, Dundee and Angus College, Edinburgh College and Developing the Young Workforce.

The construction industry currently employs 233,600 people, but it’s estimated that 28% of that workforce will need replacing by 2027, creating at least 21,000 vacancies. Attracting more potential employees to our industry to address this imminent skills gap is one of Construction Scotland’s top priorities.

“What better way to encourage young people to consider a career in the traditional skills side of construction than to invite them to give it a go for themselves. With the Scottish Parliament as the backdrop to this event, I hope the school children feel truly inspired to think of construction as a varied and exciting career choice. “Ian Hughes, Partnerships Director at CITB Scotland

“These Traditional Building Skills events are part of our Inspiring Construction programme, which aims to attract more school leavers to the sector by informing young people and their parents, teachers and career advisors about the huge and diverse range of careers available in construction, and importantly, how to access them. From professions like architecture, engineering and surveying to the more traditional trades like joinery and stonemasonry, this industry has something to suit everyone.” Ken Gillespie, Chair of Construction Scotland