Tag Archives: Career Education

The National Parent Forum Scotland: Information on careers, skills and pathways

NPFS Career EdThe National Parent Forum Scotland has released a number of key documents to inform parents about the latest developments around career education, advice and guidance and the implications this has for their children.  The series includes following publications:

    1. Career Education: A World of Possibilities:  This publication provides a helpful introduction to the programme of career education introduced in the 2015/16 school year.
    2. Learning pathways in the senior phase and beyond:  The  information flyer outlines the diverse pathways available to learners from S4 onwards.
    3. Skills in a Nutshell:  This leaflet outlines the nature and   importance of developing skills for learning, life and work.
    4. Creativity, Enterprise and Employability:  This guide will tell
      you about creativity and what it means in terms of career pathways for learners.
    5. Career Conversations:  This guide provides hints and tips on how to have a  constrictive career conversation with children and young people.
    6. Apprenticeships in a Nutshell:  This flyer tells you all you need to know about this career pathway  including information on Foundation Apprenticeships.

More publications in this series can be accessed within the download section of the National Parent Forum Scotland website

Helping you to help pupils make subject to career connections

sharon-orourkeSharon O’Rourke, Skills Development Scotland

Helping young people make connections between what they are learning in classrooms and the world of work they’ll enter when they leave school has been brought into sharp focus by Building the Curriculum 4, the Career Education Standard and of course, Developing the Young Workforce.

Embedding career information and advice web service My World of Work into lessons, using SDS’s newly developed ‘lesson inserts’, is our way of helping you to make that connection for young people without needing to be a career expert yourself.

What are lesson inserts?

Lesson inserts are our answer to the common pupil question ‘why are we doing this?’

Co-created with teachers, for teachers, these are short, easy-to-use and adaptable activities, linking curriculum topics to careers by using the wealth of information on My World of Work.

The lesson inserts use the ‘plan on a page’ format. All essential information is in one place, brief and to the point, so you don’t need a lot of preparation time to use them; just pick it up and it’s ready to go. They are also flexible enough for teachers to expand or shorten the activities to meet the needs of their lesson.

How it works in practice

The short activities set out a range of ways to help young people make career connections.

These could be links to a job profile or film lasting only a few minutes featuring a person working in a certain career. For example during a biology lesson on dissection, a link to the job profile for a pathologist has a handy video showing the job in action.

Alternatively, individual or group exercises can encourage deeper careers research by perhaps asking pupils to complete a quiz or worksheet which requires searching My World of Work for the answers.

Or perhaps the activity might be given as homework to pupils to research jobs on My World of Work that are related to your subject with an action to discuss any common skills across them all in your next lesson.

At Whitburn Academy, Computing Science teachers are using the lesson inserts to show pupils and their parents how vital the subject is across a variety of careers. They are designing activities that mix careers research with practical programming activities to show the link to modern day jobs, such as Web or Games design, as well as the part programming plays in more traditional trades, such as electrician. This encourages young people to understand the breadth of opportunity their subject offers.  The teachers used the subject choice tool to research careers information for their lesson inserts, which they said increased their confidence to promote the subject in school and at parents’ evenings.

Keeping it current

As you know, My World of Work is part of the range of support on offer from Skills Development Scotland.

The information it holds is regularly updated, ensuring pupils are always accessing the most up-to-date information possible.

Using links to My World of Work helps young people develop career management skills and widens their career horizons as they become more informed about the career choices available to them.

Using My World of Work also provides the opportunity for teachers to build their career intelligence, whilst increasing their knowledge of what’s available on the site from the perspective, not just of a teacher, but as an individual, and perhaps as a parent as well.

Get Involved

We are still early in the process of creating lesson inserts, and are keen to work with teachers across all subjects to create more.

Examples of the lesson inserts that have recently been developed with teachers can be found in the partner area of My World of Work.

If you’re not registered or haven’t used the range of resources we have for teachers on My World of Work, why not sign up as a partner today and get involved?

The partner development and integration (PD&I) team at SDS are here to support you every step of the way. We really believe that these lesson inserts can be a useful, inspiring tool to support learning in your classroom.

We all want to see young people go on to successful and fulfilling careers when they leave school.

These lesson inserts are another way for us all to support them to do just that.

If you’d like to get involved email sharon.orourke@sds.co.uk

My World of Work Ambassadors Programme

My World of Work’ Ambassadors programme is a free, easy-to-run programme with ready-made resources that provides career education benefits for pupils, teachers, parents, carers and the wider school community.

Ambassadors act as champions for Skills Development Scotland’s award-winning career information and advice web service My World of Work, helping spread the word of the support it offers to their friends, fellow pupils, teachers, parents and carers.

If you haven’t used My World of Work before, it’s a fantastic resource, packed with tools, advice and information empowering users to make informed, confident career decisions.    My World of Work complements the Career Management Skills framework and Career Education Standard. There are also dedicated partner and parent sections equipping teachers, parents and carers with resources, information and advice to support young people with career decisions.

Initially trialled with a number of schools as a pilot project in 2014, the programme has developed in collaboration with teachers and pupils and is now available to all secondary schools.

The benefits for pupils

By volunteering to be an Ambassador, pupils gain valuable experience and skills that are transferable to the world of work.

They’ll improve at problem solving, taking the lead, planning and organising, working as part of a team, communicating with people and of course, gaining a deeper understanding of their own career management skills.

Their experiences can be used to contribute to wider achievement awards, such as the Duke of Edinburgh Awards as well as adding weight to profiles, CVs and UCAS applications.

We all know how important that real life experience can be, and the advantage it offers young people.

You only have to read the story of one of our first Ambassadors Michael Clark, whose experiences as part of the programme helped him to land a Digital Marketing Modern Apprenticeship.

He was told during his interview for the job that the experience he gained as an Ambassador ‘stuck out’ giving him ‘amazing’ additions to his CV.

The benefits of this programme aren’t restricted to pupils though; teachers and the wider school community also stand to gain.

The benefits for your schooljosh-handel-beth-campbell

Ambassadors are in-house experts on My World of Work.

They’re a resource for teachers, other pupils, parents, carers and support staff to get help making the most of the web service.

By promoting My World of Work and career management skills across the whole school, Ambassadors also contribute towards the delivery of national frameworks Developing the Young Workforce, the Career Education Standard, How Good is Our School 4 and of course, Curriculum for Excellence.

It also offers schools the chance to showcase pupil achievements in newsletters, on social media, in local media and at awards ceremonies.

The benefits for teachers

The programme also supports the continuing professional development of teachers.

The lead teacher or teachers can raise their profile inside and outside of school, as well as improve their networks, depending on the types of events that are organised.

It also offers the opportunity to gain experience outside of subject area expertise, particularly in leadership, project management, communication and the delivery of events.

Getting started

Teachers can find all the resources for the My World of Work Ambassadors programme in their My World of Work account as long as they are registered as a partner.

The scale of the programme can be adapted to suit individual schools and resources, and we’re already seeing some great examples of best practice.

At St Paul’s RC Academy in Dundee, Ambassadors are supporting S1 pupils after their move from primary school to create their own My World of Work accounts, and promoting the career education tools for primary 5 to 7 pupils with cluster primary schools.

The principle teacher responsible for Developing the Young Workforce (DYW) at St Andrews & St Brides High School in South Lanarkshire is ensuring succession management by running small groups of Ambassadors across the senior phase, ensuring expertise is retained as part of the culture of learning.

At Alva Academy in Clackmannanshire, the intention is to have one ‘lead’ Ambassador and up to 20 ‘subject’ Ambassadors to help link faculties and subjects directly to the extensive resources within My World of Work.

We also have a number of schools who prefer to start off ‘small’ with just a couple of Ambassadors to promote My World of Work at parents’ events. The important thing is that the programme works for the school and its pupils.

shirley-davison-pdiIf you have questions about getting started or want to find out more please don’t hesitate to get in touch with me on shirley.davison@sds.co.uk

 

Making connections: Numeracy & Mathematics and the world of work

The following materials will be of interest to anyone who would like to explore connections between numeracy/mathematics and the world of work. It includes an interactive financial education resource, Money Talks, an article on how mathematics is used in the workplace from the Mathematics Association of America and Citizen Maths, a site for people who want to become more confident in using maths at work and in life.     There are also links to the National Numeracy and Mathematics Hub, a virtual learning environment for all practitioners and a copy of the latest Numeracy and Mathematics Resource Guide.

 

FREE Cyber Security Summer Camp for S6 Pupils

digital world eyeDoes your school have students with a keen interest in software, computing, telecommunications, cyber security, maths and ethics who are planning to start university to study Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths or Social Science either in autumn this year, or in autumn 2017 after a gap year?   If so, we are delighted to offer them the chance of FREE places at the prestigious Cyber Security residential Glasgow Caledonian University – 4 to 22 July 2016 delivered by GCHQ and their training partner QA.

See the courses’ details, locations, dates, eligibility criteria and how to apply on our website at: http://www.arkwright.org.uk/exclusive/cyberfirst_advanced.htm .   Students who are chosen to attend one of these courses could enhance their application for one of the new CyberFirst Student Bursaries to support their university studies – that’s £4,000 per year for every year of the student’s undergraduate course!

If your students think they’ve got what it takes to impress the experts at GCHQ and QA, they should check their eligibility on our webpage and apply NOW for one of the FREE places. Only 30 free places are being offered. The deadline for applications is Friday 17th June 2016 – so please can you spread the word about these courses rapidly.

Basic student eligibility requirements are: ·   Must be a UK national ·   Must be at least 18 years old on the day before their chosen course starts in July/August this year.

This opportunity is open to all final year students (who meet the eligibility criteria), not just Arkwright Scholars.   Please see website for full details: http://www.arkwright.org.uk/exclusive/cyberfirst_advanced.htm

Questions can be directed to:  Cyber-First-Project@gchq.gsi.gov.uk

Skills Development Scotland: Extended career services offer

Skills Development Scotland (SDS) is expanding its careers sJ Russell Head of CEServices in schools from June 2016, Head of Career Management Skills Development and Delivery James Russell tells us more.

“I can still remember the best piece of advice I was offered while I was at school – be the best you can be and do what will make you happy.

The advice came from my sister who was a maths teacher.

She supported me throughout school not just in her subject, but also in developing study skills and what I now understand to be the fundamental principles of a learning or continuous improvement cycle.

Her support had a huge impact on me, helping me to develop my knowledge, skills and confidence.

It challenged my thinking on what motivated me and what I wanted to do with my life.

It’s more than 20 years since my sister said those words to me, but my experience reflects how good careers advice can open young people’s eyes to the opportunities and possibilities of their future.

The work of SDS careers advisers is having a similar long-lasting impact on young people across Scotland day-in and day-out.

Now, I’m lucky enough to be part of the team at SDS working to extend the reach of our careers services in schools to offer further support for younger pupils, their teachers and parents.

This expansion will allow us to reach younger pupils, especially at big transition points such as choosing subjects, or at the move from primary to secondary school.

It will help ensure the choices they make about their future are informed, and based on their skills, interests and abilities alone.

What to expect

SDS In-School Infographics AW2June marks the start of the new offer being available across the country.  The extended elements of the offer will see Careers Advisers:

  • hold group sessions at primary 7 transition or early in S1 to support individuals during this key transition phase; and with pupils in S2 and S3, aligned with arrangements for making subject choices
  • offer one-to-one interviews with pupils at subject choices time and offer their parent/ carer and/or teacher to be involved during this one-to-one or at another suitable time
  • working closely with schools to identify and agree the delivery of enhanced support to develop career management skills (CMS) to those S3 pupils who need it most, on a one-to-one basis. Follow-up group activity can also be held as agreed

That’s in addition to what’s already in secondary schools which sees SDS advisers:

  • hold group sessions during the senior phase (S4-S6) using interactive activities to continue to develop pupils’ CMS
  • offer one-to-one coaching for those pupils in the senior phase who need it most to support their decision making and progression
  • hold drop-in clinics for all young people from S1-S6
  • be available at parents’ events

Testing is also continuing on our new career education tools and resources for primary 5 to 7 teachers and pupils, which will be available in August.

These will be accessed through our award-winning career information and advice web service, My World of Work, which also has specific advice and support for parents and carers.

Tried and tested

The changes support delivery of the Career Education Standard and the outcomes of Developing Scotland’s Young Workforce, as well as complementing a wide range of other SDS projects such as Foundation Apprenticeships and Improving Gender Balance Scotland.

Annual discussions between SDS and individual secondary schools on the SDS School Partnership Agreement are underway. These discussions enable us to collaborate on how we align and integrate SDS services to compliment the curriculum activities already in place to develop pupils’ knowledge of the world of work and career pathways.

The partnership agreements ensure we can shape how SDS resources are best used to match each school’s strengths, needs and local circumstances.

35 schools in 12 local authorities worked with us across the 2015/16 academic year to be ‘early demonstrators’ for the extended offer. This has enabled us to evaluate the service offer in practice and develop it further in advance its introduction in all other schools across the 2016/17 academic year.

Young people, teachers and SDS staff were an integral part of the process of developing the Career Education Standard and our expanded careers services offer; our work with them will continue to help us understand how we can improve the service further.

We’ve also developed CLPL modules for teachers along with Education Scotland. The first, an introduction and overview of the Career Education Standard, is already online. Three more will be added soon on Career Management Skills, labour market information and My World of Work.

We all want young people to be able to go on to successful and fulfilling careers, and I look forward to the part SDS can play in supporting them to get there.”

BBC News: Career talks ‘boost future earnings’ – research

PWP_2629Career education given to pupils in secondary school can be linked to higher earnings in adult life,  according to the latest research highlighted in a BBC News report.

A study published in the Journal of Education and Work suggests that better-informed teenagers are likely to make more advantageous career choices.

It measures the earnings benefit as an extra £2,000 per year for every six careers sessions when aged 14 to 15.

Researchers used the British Cohort Study tracking 17,000 people.

The research, commissioned by the Education and Employers charity, found that once other factors were taken into account, such as exam results and economic background, there were higher earnings for those who had received sustained careers advice in school.

The study, by Christian Percy and Elnaz Kashefpakdela from the University of Bath, used data from the British Cohort Study which has been tracking the health, wealth and education of people since 1970.

It concluded that there was a long-lasting employment impact from careers talks and lessons.

Where there were “higher levels of employer contacts, in the form of careers talks with outside speakers”, researchers found that this was linked to higher returns in the labour market.

They concluded that getting careers information and meeting employers in school had a “meaningful and statistically significant impact on later earnings”.

Anthony Mann, director of policy and research for Education and Employers, said: “Other well-known studies have highlighted the benefits of employer engagement, but never before have we had such a robust analysis drawing on such rich data.”

Nick Soar, head teacher at Bishop Challoner Catholic Federation in east London, backed the benefits of outside speakers from industry.

“The pupils love it. They ask endless questions and you can see it really brings home to them what they need to do to succeed in the workplace,” he said.

CBI president Paul Drechsler said: “This report makes clear the importance and impact of great careers insights and advice from people in the business world.”

Andreas Schleicher, the OECD’s education director, said the study provided evidence for how “career education translates into measurable earnings advantages”.

Education and Childcare Minister Sam Gyimah said the research “provides further evidence of the positive impact an employer can have on a young person’s future career”.

Making connections: DYW in context

Julie_Anderson-234x300In her blog post for SCQF Julie Anderson, DYW Team Leader for Senior Phase Pathways & College Partnerships in the Scottish Government’s Learning Directorate makes the connection between Developing the Young Workforce and Curriculum for Excellence and talks about some of the learning pathways being developed.  Julie highlights that a learner-centred approach to career education provides young people with appropriate progression routes tailored to their needs and wants.  The SCQF can help to plan appropriate pathways by brining clarity and equality to all qualifications and learning.

Julie says:  “Young people can use the SCQF to understand the level of the learning they have already achieved and plan their future learning pathways. The SCQF website provides a wealth of information, case studies and resources for learners, parents, carers, schools and employers.”

You can read all of Julie’s SCQF blog here.

Webinar: Career Education 3 – 18; Thursday, 3 Dec @ 4pm

RoadmapRegister:  When is it?   Thursday, 3 December, 4 – 5 pm

Where?  Live on Glow TV (Glow login required).   Register here

Who is this for?  Head teachers, teachers,  employers, parents/carers and anyone one else interested/ involved  in the development of career education from 3 -18.

Presenters:

Mairi Thomson, Development Officer, Skills 3 – 18 Team);                Ken Edwards, Education Programme Lead, Skills Development Scotland;                                                                                                                                      James Cook, Depute head teacher, Crown Primary School, Highland Council;

About the Glow Meet:

This interactive session will share some news around career education in Scotland.

Information about the career education standard will be shared along with some ‎tools to help you and your colleagues explore the standard. Skills Development Scotland will share the work underway to support learners, teachers and parents/carers.

You will be given insight into a successful Career Management Skills project run in Lochardil Primary School, Highlands. The presentation by James Cook comes with a set of materials that describes the aims of the project, provides a 14 week programme outline and evaluative comments. It is worth hearing about!

There will be time for you to ask questions about the presentations as well as the wider Developing the Young Workforce agenda.

Hope you can tune in and join us.

DYW – All you need to know….!

Small - DYW IntroThis monthly ‎series provides a professional learning opportunity for anyone interested in finding out more about developments emerging from the Developing the Young Workforce programme. Topics will include: Career education 3-18, work placements, school/employer partnerships, links to CfE, vocational pathways, senior phase developments etc.

These sessions are interactive in nature and give all involved the opportunity to ask questions, reflect on current practice and engage in professional dialogue with colleagues on key issues around this agenda.

In this first session on Thursday 5th November at 4pm you will get an exclusive introduction to the DYW team which will provide you with an overview of the wider Developing the Young Workforce agenda. We will also introduce the newly released ‎guidance on School/Employer Partnerships, Career Education (3-18) and Work Placements Standards. There will also be time to ask specific questions, exchange information or raise any burning issues.

Sign up and join us live in Glow TV – DYW – All you need to know….!

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

NB The next session in this new series will take place on Thursday 3rd December – more details to follow.