Tag Archives: career advice

New NHSScotland Careers Resource pack now available!

NHS Education for Scotland has developed an NHSScotland Careers Resource pack which is fresh out of the box and ‘ready to go’! The pack contains a ready-made set of lessons with everything you need for a one-off lesson or a full Unit of five lessons.

The pack contains:   A comprehensive booklet called ‘A Career for You in Health’ which is a guide to every job family in NHSScotland. This booklet contains everything pupils need to know about entry requirements, skills, values and much more for each job role.

An NHSScotland Careers teaching unit with resources for use in one-to-one career guidance, group sessions, drop-in clinics and events like parents’ evenings. These include:

  • ready-made slide packs e.g. ‘Introduction to NHSScotland’
  • a ‘word bank’ with vocabulary for use in CVs or to support understanding of NHSscotland job advertisements
  • job profiles for a variety of job roles in NHSScotland, from gardener to doctor, from midwife to IT engineer!
  • engaging pupil resources including quizzes and creative activities

To ensure that the learning is relevant for use in schools, the resource pack aligns with

  1. The Career Education Standard 3-18
  2. Curriculum for Excellence: Health and Wellbeing Experiences and Outcomes
  3. SDS Career Management Skills framework

A job family leaflet showing all NHSScotland job families ‘at a glance’ which could be used with individuals, small groups, classes or at events such as parents’ evenings.

Look no further for a source of information and materials about NHSScotland careers!

Download the pack today at:  http://bit.ly/2zYdLYL

TES feature: Primary career education should broaden children’s horizons

By Nick Chambers for TES

The focus for primary schools shouldn’t be on ‘careers advice’ but on ‘career-related learning’, argues Nick Chambers

The last few months have seen a sudden enthusiasm for careers education in primary schools. Of course, it is a simple and seductive idea.
But many teachers and parents have expressed their concerns that we risk making our children grow up too fast. They are understandably concerned about the dangers in directing children towards a particular career or job at a time when their aspirations should be wide-ranging and, in large part, without boundaries.
I share their concerns. We should not be providing careers advice in primary schools: instead we should focus on broadening horizons and raising aspirations, giving children a wide range of experiences including the world of work. It is about opening doors, showing children the vast range of possibilities and helping to keep their options open for as long as possible.
And there are a range of attributes, skills and behaviours that can be encouraged in this early stage of a child’s life that will leave them in the best possible position as they begin their transitions to secondary education and to future life.
There is often alarm, too, when people hear or read the word ‘careers’ in the same sentence as primary schools. In my opinion, the focus for primary schools shouldn’t be on ‘careers advice’ but on what I refer to as ‘career-related learning’.
Teachers would tend to agree. Our recent survey, in partnership with Tes and the NAHT headteachers’ union, found that the majority of teachers believe that children should be learning about the world of work and different jobs in their first years of primary school. Nearly half (47 per cent) believed this should start from age five and under and that linking learning to the real world helped increase motivation, broaden aspirations and challenge gender stereotypes.
Politicians, too, are on side. Robert Halfon MP, chair of the Commons Education Select Committee was spot on in saying in Tes recently: “The impact of early engagement can have a hugely positive impact on wider academic attainment, motivating and inspiring both children and their families, by helping them to see a future to which they can aspire and which feels achievable.”
Earlier this year we tried to explore this a little further by exploring who primary-aged children ideally want to become, and, what shapes (and often limits) their career aspirations and dreams for the future. Drawing the Future asked children aged 7 to 11 to draw a picture of the job they wanted to do when they grew up. More than 13,000 children took part in the UK and it was clear that, from a young age, many children had ideas about careers. Some 36 per cent of children from as young as seven years old, based their career aspirations on people they knew. For those who didn’t know anyone who did the job they drew, 45 per cent stated that TV, film and radio were the biggest factors influencing their choice.
Meanwhile, less than 1 per cent of children knew about a job from someone visiting their school. This has huge implications for social mobility, as children from poorer backgrounds may not have access to successful role models from the world of work and their aspirations are limited as a result.
All children, regardless of their background should get the chance to meet a wide range of people doing different jobs, in different sectors and at different levels – from apprentices to CEOs.
This is essential if we are to improve social mobility and gender and ethnic equality. It is vital we support children to challenge the perceptions they may have about certain jobs, and to better understand the evolving world they are growing up in while they are still in primary school.
While teachers appreciate the importance to children of career-related learning many say that the lack of time and availability of volunteers are preventing them doing more. The NAHT has taken a lead to tackle this and created Primary Futures in partnership with my charity, Education and Employers.

Emma Fieldhouse from South Parade Primary school in Wakefield explains why her school got involved: “It was amazing to see the children talking and listening to the volunteers, and each other, as they begin to make the link between what they do in school every day and the exciting world of the future where they will be the next scientists, teachers, politicians, vets”.
We must not rest until we see this kind of ambition running through all of our students in all of our primary schools.

Nick Chambers is the founder and chief executive officer of the charity Education and Employers. The charity runs Inspiring the Future and its Primary Futures and Inspiring Women programmes and undertakes research into the effectiveness of employer engagement

Women in Wellies – Event 2018

A one day event to inspire young women to choose rural careers took place on 30th October 2018.

The event was a huge success with 170 attendees and Cairngorms National Park Authority (CNPA) is keen to do the event again next year.

CNPA is also keen for organisations across Scotland to use the model and repeat the event.

A new webpage has been created, sharing videos of the event and providing links for rural careers information (training, volunteering, jobs, qualifications):

http://cairngorms.co.uk/caring-future/education-learning/women-in-wellies/

This document outlines how we planned the event, successes, and how Women in Wellies can be developed in the future. Please share the document with anyone who is interested in planning a Women in Wellies event.

Attendees

The venue (Boat of Garten Community Hall) had a seated capacity of 200. We invited five local High Schools (Alford, Aboyne, Kingussie, Grantown and Speyside) to bring up to 30 girls each from S4-S6. We promoted the event to students through contacts at UHI. We opened up some places for young women and women seeking a career change through Eventbrite. All places were free. CNPA covered transport costs for school groups.

Speakers

We planned speakers by thinking about the particular jobs / areas of work in the outdoor sector we wanted covered, and then consulted our steering group to find suggestions for good speakers to fill those slots.  Here is an outline of the programme.

Programme

30th October 2018 Boat of Garten

9.30 Arrival and Welcome

10 Introduction by Jo O’Hara (Forestry Commission Scotland)

10.40 Panel chaired by Anna Fleming (Cairngorms National Park Authority) Area Speaker Organisation / employer
Stalking Megan Rowland Gordonbush Estate
Crofting / rangering / landscape management Lynn Cassells Lynbreck Croft
Farming Joyce Campbell Women in Agriculture Taskforce
Recreation / mountain guiding Heather Morning Mountaineering Scotland
Conservation / landscape Frances Thin Cairngorms National Park Authority
Forestry Sarah Toulson Cawdor Forestry

 

Afternoon

Farming and crofting Lynn and Sandra, Lynbreck Croft
 
Forestry, conservation and field ecology Becks Denny, field surveys
Veterinary, equine and academia Sophie Boyd, Strathspey Veterinary Centre
Game keeping, stalking and fisheries Pamela Esson, River Dee Trust
Guiding, recreation and rangers Heather Morning, Mountaineering Scotland

 

 

LANTRA 2017 – Career Workshops and Skills Events

The latest event in a series of  workshops and events on career pathways and skills development in the land-base, aquaculture and environmental industries, will take place on Thursday, 14 December, Westerwood Hotel, Cumbernauld (10am – 3pm). (contact: 01738 310164 or Scotland@lantra.co.uk)

Two recent LANYRA career workshops run for SDS career staff, teachers, DYW regional groups etc. were held in Perth & Lanark. Here are the links to the presentations from industry speakers :

LANTRA’s website offers plenty of information on  exciting and rewarding jobs in this industry sector, especially for Modern Apprentices. Find out more by signing up for our quarterly newsletter or contacting us LANTRA directly.

And:  The new rural skills video has just been published and can be viewed on  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omCE4wlikqo

Equality & Inclusion: Good practice exemplars

The following four good practice exemplars have been published on the National Improvement Hub to highlight initiatives that help learners requiring additional support to develop skills and find employment.

Exemplar 1: Enable Scotland’s ‘Stepping Up’ programme

This innovative employability programme offers comprehensive support for young people aged 14 to 19 who have learning disabilities which takes participants from an initial investigation of the world of work, through a process of discovery and planning for their future, to engagement with employers in real workplace settings. Find out more here.

Exemplar 2: ‘Thinking Digitally’ – a new resource

This credit rate module by Lead Scotland allows candidates to develop relevant digital skills and build confidence operating in online environments.  More on this here.

Exemplar 3:  ‘TOPs’ – training opportunities for young parents

This programme run by Rathbone Training, a UK-wide voluntary youth sector organisation which supports young people aged 16 to 24 who have disengaged from society, aims to help young parents in their personal development. More here.

Exemplar 4: ‘Community Action and Leadership Award

This is a course created by the charity Lead Scotland so that more people can learn how to influence change and make a difference within their communities. More information here.

Edinburgh International Film Festival 2017

The programme for EIFF Youth Hub 2017 is now live!

Now in its fourth year, EIFF Youth Hub returns for four days packed with free practical filmmaking workshops, masterclasses and events for 15-25 year-olds. Whether you want to gain insights into animation or screenwriting, learn from experienced filmmakers about acting, cinematography or short filmmaking, or if you just want to network and step into a career in film – Youth Hub has something for everyone from 23 to 26 of June.

Events at Youth Hub are free with a Youth Hub Pass which costs £5 and gives access to all Youth Hub events as well as £5 discounted tickets to most EIFF films.

Highlights from this year’s programme directly related to careers in the industry:

A Foot in the Door: First Steps in Film & TV Drama

Saturday, 24 June 2017 | 5pm – 7pm | Education Space | Limited to 30 spaces.

Outlining how being a great runner can be the key to a successful start to your career. 

BAFTA award winning Scottish producer Linda Fraser (Hit the Ground Running) will share an overview of the industry in Scotland, what a runner does and how to be awesome at it. Packed with practical insider info and tips for how to get started, this is a session not to be missed!

Spaces for this event are limited. To sign-up please email youthhub@edfilmfest.org.uk 

A Foot in the Door: Career Advice Session

Saturday, 24 June 2017 | 10.15am – 1.30pm |Main Hall | Limited to 50 spaces.

Want to get your foot in the door and break into the film/TV industry? Join us for our hugely popular careers advice session with Creative Skillset and training scheme Hit the Ground Running as we help you plan your next big step towards a career in the industry. This session includes:

10.15am – 11am: Panel discussion 11.10 am – 12.15pm: Networking surgery with filmmakers and experts from the creative industries. 12.15pm – 1.30pm: A light networking lunch with industry guests, EIFF filmmakers and delegates.

Spaces for this event are limited. To sign-up please email youthhub@edfilmfest.org.uk

Access the full programme here:  https://www.edfilmfest.org.uk/learning/youth-hub

 

 

SDS: Help with subject choices

The subjects your child chooses at school can have an impact on sds-in-school-infographics-aw2what they can study at college or university and what jobs they can go for in the future.

Skills Development Scotland careers advisers are available in schools for one-to-one sessions with pupils making early subject choices.

Building career management skills, these sessions aim to prepare young people to make confident, informed subject choices.

The careers adviser will support the young person to explore the impact of choices, understand what or who is influencing them and discuss the support offered by My World of Work’s subject choices tool.

Parents and teachers can get involved in this discussion or at another time.

My World of Work is packed with tools, information and resources to help young people with answering key questions and putting together a shortlist of subjects they can discuss with their parents, carers, teachers and careers adviser.

There’s also information for parents and carers on supporting their child at subject choice time.

Find out more about SDS careers services in schools

Go to myworldofwork.co.uk

Foundation Apprenticeships

Foundation Apprenticeships allow young people to get a head start in their career by knowledge and skills that are applied in the workplace – all before they’ve left school.

Sitting a Foundation Apprenticeship takes two years, usually starting in fifth year and is studied alongside National 5s and Highers. The difference is spending time out of school at college and with a top employer, so pupils get real, hands-on experience of the world of work.

It’s a chance to gain an industry-recognised qualifications (set at SQCF level 6) that opens up options for young people when they leave school.

Foundation Apprenticeships in ten subjects – including software development, healthcare, financial services and engineering – are available to pupils going into S5.

Find out more