Category Archives: Uncategorised

Professional learning to support teachers delivering 1+2 Gaelic (Learners)

This professional learning is for teachers.

7 – 12 July (summer school) & 21 – 24 July (symposium), 2019

Are you looking for an opportunity to use and further your Gaelic in a fun and supportive community setting?

Come to South Uist, where Ceòlas Uibhist is offering:

  • Short courses in the strongest Gaelic community;
  • Quality tuition from experienced native Gaelic speakers;
  • A positive and supportive learning environment;

OBJECTIVES

  • Gain confidence in speaking Gaelic in a community setting;
  • Experience the rich oral tradition and culture as a teaching resource;
  • Extend your knowledge of the natural environment, heritage and indigenous skills for cross-curricular themes;

OUTCOMES

  • Strengthening of grammar, vocabulary, idiom and dialect;
  • Understanding of Gaelic as a social and economic asset;
  • Building connections with others in similar situations;

WHEN           Week 1 (7 – 12 July); Week 2 (21 – 24 July) 2019

WHERE          Dalabrog, South Uist

WHAT            Gaelic Enrichment Course for Gaelic Teachers

For more information, please contact: info@ceolas.co.uk

Young Enterprise ‘Tenner Programme’ contributes to SQA Personal Development Awards

SQA and Young Enterprise Scotland have been working together to demonstrate how the Tenner Challenge could generate evidence that meets the assessment standards of some SQA units.

Young Enterprise Scotland’s Tenner Challenge, in which participants make as much profit as possible from £10, provides an interactive way for learners to develop employability skills. The Tenner Challenge helps learners to develop skills including creativity, resilience and problem solving.

This document and case study outline how the Tenner Challenge could generate evidence that meets the assessment standards for the SQA units Personal Development: Self and Work (H18P 44) and Enterprise Activity (D36N 10).

Once evidence has been gathered via the Tenner Challenge, centres will have to check learners’ work against the Assessment Standards for the SQA units. The examples provided here illustrate the type of activities and evidence that are likely to generate appropriate evidence.

The contribution that Young Enterprise’s Tenner Challenge offers, in terms of evidence, will also depend on the range of activities that are being undertaken.

All evidence must be subject to rigorous assessment procedures and internal verification.

Civil engineering apprenticeship has laid foundation for Sophia’s career

Taking a Foundation Apprenticeship gave Sophia Findlay the chance to find out what a career in engineering would be like and now it’s cemented her plans for the future.

The 17-year-old from Springboig in Glasgow was planning to leave school at the end of fifth year and didn’t know what she wanted to do for a living.

Then, her mum told her about opportunities through Foundation Apprenticeships.

The St. Andrew’s RC Secondary pupil chose to take a Foundation Apprenticeship in Civil Engineering in fifth year, alongside other school subjects.

Foundation Apprenticeships give senior school pupils the chance to spend time out of the classroom with a learning provider and gain experience in a work environment.

Completion leads to a qualification at the same level as a Higher, to progress into work including Modern and Graduate Apprenticeships as well as being recognised for entry into colleges and universities across Scotland.

Sophia explained: “I had no real plan about what I wanted to do and thought I could maybe go to college and take up an art course.

“My mum told me about Foundation Apprenticeships and thought it would be worth doing because I would get work experience with a qualification and be able to stay in school until sixth year.”

Sophia took the Foundation Apprenticeship in Civil Engineering at Glasgow Kelvin College alongside her other school subjects.

In the first year, Sophia went to college two half days a week.  “My first year at college was really good” said Sophia. “I wasn’t sure what to expect, but there were also two other girls doing the Foundation Apprenticeship, so I felt more comfortable. The learning eased us in well because we weren’t bombarded with a lot of information.”

Now Sophia’s out of school one day a week getting her hands dirty, working on building sites with social housing developer, McTaggart Construction.

“At the moment I get to watch and learn,” said Sophia. “I’m looking forward to learn on the job and get hands on experience.”

Doing the Foundation Apprenticeship has opened her eyes up to different aspects of engineering Sophia didn’t know about, which has now given her a clear idea of what career she wants to pursue.

Sophia said: “I got to find out more about the career choices in Civil Engineering through the Foundation Apprenticeship and I thought they were fascinating.

“There is an opportunity to work in areas like flood protection and environmental protection, which really appeals to me because they are dealing with important issues.”

Ross Hammell, Sustainable Communities Programme Manager at McTaggart Construction:

“McTaggart Construction sees FA’s as a key element of our talent pipeline mix, alongside other traditional academic and vocational routes. The construction industry needs many more confident, hardworking young people across all disciplines to address the current skills shortage we face. The world of work can be a shock to a lot of school leavers, therefore FA’s offer the opportunity to gain a true understanding of a potential career path before they’ve even left school.”

“Since starting her FA with McTaggart Construction, Sophia has gained a lot of confidence which has enabled her to ask more questions and get more from her time on site, applying academic learning.”

Taking the Foundation Apprenticeship has changed Sophia’s opinion of school.

She explained: “Taking the Foundation Apprenticeship has given me something to look forward to and I’m excited to learn what the career would be like.

“Getting the experience of college and the workplace with my Foundation Apprenticeship has made me happier and more confident.”

Peter Brown, Senior Curriculum Manager from Glasgow Kelvin College said: “The Foundation Apprenticeship programme provides a range of benefits to our learners, chief among these being the opportunity to undertake a long-term work placement with an employer.

“During this time learners are given an invaluable insight into the world of work and a hands-on experience which inspires and shapes their future career paths whilst also preparing and equipping them with skills that are valued by industry.

“Furthermore, the Foundation Apprenticeship offers them the opportunity to learn in a programme and environment that has been solely designed with employment in mind.   Subjects they are currently studying at school e.g. Maths, Physics or IT are given real-world value through contextualisation and simulation of industry.  As a result, many learners better engage at school as abstract concepts now have real meaning and importance to their future career aspirations.”

Foundation Apprenticeships are developed by Skills Development Scotland, in partnership with employers and funded by European Social Fund.

Women in Wellies – Event 2018

A one day event to inspire young women to choose rural careers took place on 30th October 2018.

The event was a huge success with 170 attendees and Cairngorms National Park Authority (CNPA) is keen to do the event again next year.

CNPA is also keen for organisations across Scotland to use the model and repeat the event.

A new webpage has been created, sharing videos of the event and providing links for rural careers information (training, volunteering, jobs, qualifications):

http://cairngorms.co.uk/caring-future/education-learning/women-in-wellies/

This document outlines how we planned the event, successes, and how Women in Wellies can be developed in the future. Please share the document with anyone who is interested in planning a Women in Wellies event.

Attendees

The venue (Boat of Garten Community Hall) had a seated capacity of 200. We invited five local High Schools (Alford, Aboyne, Kingussie, Grantown and Speyside) to bring up to 30 girls each from S4-S6. We promoted the event to students through contacts at UHI. We opened up some places for young women and women seeking a career change through Eventbrite. All places were free. CNPA covered transport costs for school groups.

Speakers

We planned speakers by thinking about the particular jobs / areas of work in the outdoor sector we wanted covered, and then consulted our steering group to find suggestions for good speakers to fill those slots.  Here is an outline of the programme.

Programme

30th October 2018 Boat of Garten

9.30 Arrival and Welcome

10 Introduction by Jo O’Hara (Forestry Commission Scotland)

10.40 Panel chaired by Anna Fleming (Cairngorms National Park Authority) Area Speaker Organisation / employer
Stalking Megan Rowland Gordonbush Estate
Crofting / rangering / landscape management Lynn Cassells Lynbreck Croft
Farming Joyce Campbell Women in Agriculture Taskforce
Recreation / mountain guiding Heather Morning Mountaineering Scotland
Conservation / landscape Frances Thin Cairngorms National Park Authority
Forestry Sarah Toulson Cawdor Forestry

 

Afternoon

Farming and crofting Lynn and Sandra, Lynbreck Croft
 
Forestry, conservation and field ecology Becks Denny, field surveys
Veterinary, equine and academia Sophie Boyd, Strathspey Veterinary Centre
Game keeping, stalking and fisheries Pamela Esson, River Dee Trust
Guiding, recreation and rangers Heather Morning, Mountaineering Scotland

 

 

Career Pathways for Teachers: engagement event, 23 October

It’s your future, come and share with us what you‎ think we should be considering!

An independent panel has been set up, led by Moyra Boland, Glasgow University, to consider new approaches to Career Pathways for Teachers that are fit for purpose for our modern Education system.  All teachers have been sent a link to an online survey and in addition we are very keen to hear your views directly. ‎We are going around the country to engage directly with education staff. 

An engagement event has been set up in your area:

 Date:               Tuesday 23rd October

Time:               1600-1730

Venue:             Bellahouston Academy

                          30 Gower Terrace

                         Glasgow

                         G41 5QE

 

An Deasbad Naiseanta 2018

The preliminary rounds of the National Gaelic Schools Debate will take place on 6 and 7 November 2018. This year marks the twentieth national debate.  By participating in this competition, young people in Gaelic Medium Education are afforded an opportunity to develop their debating skills through the medium of Gaelic.

Education Scotland is pleased to be a sponsor for this competition along with Bòrd na Gàidhlig, The Scottish Government, Skills Development Scotland, Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, The Highland Council, Glasgow City Council and Scottish Qualifications Authority.

The final round of the competition will be on 28 November at The Scottish Parliament.

So you want to be a headteacher….?

Seminar at the Scottish Learning Festival

Leven Room, 16:15-17:15

Wednesday 19 September 2018 

Names of key presenters:

Gillian Hamilton (Strategic Director, Education Scotland), Carrie Lindsay (Executive Director of Education and Children’s Services, Fife and Regional Improvement Lead, South East Alliance), headteachers from across Scotland.

Descriptor:

Are you considering applying for a headship?  This informal discussion brings together headteachers working in different sectors across Scotland to share their experiences of headship. Carrie and Gillian will discuss the support available for aspiring and new headteachers, and the changing responsibilities and expectations of the headteacher role.  A panel of headteachers will share their experiences. Anne Graham, headteacher, Comhairle nan Eilean Siar will represent Gaelic Medium Education (GME) on this panel.

Briefing on Gaelic Education

Our latest briefing on Gaelic Education is now available and features:

  • Details of the seminar for Gaelic Education at the Scottish Learning Festival on Wednesday 19 September, 09.30-10.15. This year’s seminar is designed to support strategic planning for the expansion of ELC 1140 hours, with some advice on the GME senior phase.
  • A practice exemplar and challenge questions to support the development of the secondary GME curriculum.
  • Support for social studies in the GME curriculum: Please log in to Glow and on to the Social Studies Network (#socialstudies) to find Gaelic versions of resources for Gallipoli and World War 1. A grant of £250 is available to support learning on the First World War. This is also an opportunity to enhance intergenerational links and technology skills within the curriculum.
  • Details of the professional learning that Education Scotland is delivering at An t-Alltan in September. These focus on: leadership in GME, effective early learning and childcare (ELC) in GME and the National Standardised Assessments for GME.
  • A new resource, through the medium of Gaelic, for self-evaluation The Gaelic version of How good is OUR school? Part 1 and Part 2  is now available on the National Improvement Hub.

Please follow this link to our Briefings.

There are ongoing updates on our blog for GME and Gaelic Learner Education.

 

The importance of partnership planning to deliver high quality, work-related learning

John Devine, head teacher at  Breadalbane Academy, an all-through school  in rural Perthshire has invested in a unique approach to provide learners with meaningful, tailored and diverse work-based learning opportunities.   The school has introduced a Employer Engagement & Partnership programme with 3-5 year agreements with its business partners implemented by a project officer. “These partnerships lend structure and clarity to the process and help to ensure that engagements are well-planned on both sides, that they are relevant to the curriculum and transfer knowledge and expertise from industry to classroom and vice-versa.”

As a result children and young people gain invaluable  skills and work experience  which help them forge a clearer vision for their future career pathways .

“Through offering a broad and inclusive curriculum which is enhanced through employer engagement and partnerships we  believe that our young people are well prepared for success as they progress from school to tertiary education and the workplace.”

The following document outlines the implementation and outcomes of the project:  Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – Final

Other related documents:

Please refer to the School-Employer Partnership Guidance for further information