Category Archives: Supporting children and young people

New NHSScotland Careers Resource pack now available!

NHS Education for Scotland has developed an NHSScotland Careers Resource pack which is fresh out of the box and ‘ready to go’! The pack contains a ready-made set of lessons with everything you need for a one-off lesson or a full Unit of five lessons.

The pack contains:   A comprehensive booklet called ‘A Career for You in Health’ which is a guide to every job family in NHSScotland. This booklet contains everything pupils need to know about entry requirements, skills, values and much more for each job role.

An NHSScotland Careers teaching unit with resources for use in one-to-one career guidance, group sessions, drop-in clinics and events like parents’ evenings. These include:

  • ready-made slide packs e.g. ‘Introduction to NHSScotland’
  • a ‘word bank’ with vocabulary for use in CVs or to support understanding of NHSscotland job advertisements
  • job profiles for a variety of job roles in NHSScotland, from gardener to doctor, from midwife to IT engineer!
  • engaging pupil resources including quizzes and creative activities

To ensure that the learning is relevant for use in schools, the resource pack aligns with

  1. The Career Education Standard 3-18
  2. Curriculum for Excellence: Health and Wellbeing Experiences and Outcomes
  3. SDS Career Management Skills framework

A job family leaflet showing all NHSScotland job families ‘at a glance’ which could be used with individuals, small groups, classes or at events such as parents’ evenings.

Look no further for a source of information and materials about NHSScotland careers!

Download the pack today at:  http://bit.ly/2zYdLYL

Inclusion team training January to April 2019

Restorative Approaches
14th and 15th February 2019 Edinburgh – Victoria Quay, Edinburgh
22nd and 23rd March 2019 Glasgow – Optima Building, Glasgow
Many people may believe that children and young people must be punished when they misbehave. This type of response can be ineffective, dangerous, breed resentment and make situations worse as a child or young person can be resentful of punishment rather than reflective of their actions. Children and young people require the opportunity to hear about and face up to the harm and distress they have caused others.
Restorative approaches are built on values which separate the person from the behaviour. They promote accountability and seek to repair any harm caused in a situation.
What are restorative approaches?
Schools may use restorative approaches as part of a planned response to relationship and/or discipline difficulties. This is a more effective response than traditional punishments. Restorative approaches can change the emotional atmosphere in a school and lead to more positive relationships between pupils and between pupils and staff.
These two day national training events are open to all staff and managers working in schools who have an interest in improving the ethos and culture in their school or setting.
Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come basis. Previous feedback includes “one of the most valuable training experiences I have ever been on”.

Solution Oriented Approaches
7th and 8th February 2019 – Optima, Robertson street, Glasgow
9th and 10th May 2019- Victoria Quay, Edinburgh
Solution oriented approaches aim to build individual capacity for effective problem solving and reflective practice and can be used effectively to support key meetings and discussions within schools. This is a strengths-based approach which, while acknowledging problems, focuses on future possibilities and solutions.
Solution oriented approaches have been used by practitioners in schools for a number of years with regard to supporting day-to-day practice and have also supported whole school strategic change. More recently, solution oriented practice has been used effectively to actively support positive relationships and culture change in the classroom.
This two day training aims to increase understanding and awareness of the approach and develop participant skills in working with individuals and groups, as well as developing the skills to run solution-oriented meetings.
Book a place

If you are interested in booking a place please email the following address putting the name and date of the relevant course in the subject heading of the e-mail.

EDSIE@EducationScotland.gsi.gov.uk

The Compassionate and Connected Community and Classroom
30th and 31st January 2019 Victoria Quay, Edinburgh
Education Scotland are currently developing a professional learning and curricular resource which aims to increase awareness and develop support for children and young people who have experienced adversity and trauma.
Following the initial pilot training, at which a number of local authorities were represented, professional learning will take place on the above dates for further local authority partners. The relevant local authorities will be contacted and offered places.

The importance of partnership planning to deliver high quality, work-related learning

John Devine, head teacher at  Breadalbane Academy, an all-through school  in rural Perthshire has invested in a unique approach to provide learners with meaningful, tailored and diverse work-based learning opportunities.   The school has introduced a Employer Engagement & Partnership programme with 3-5 year agreements with its business partners implemented by a project officer. “These partnerships lend structure and clarity to the process and help to ensure that engagements are well-planned on both sides, that they are relevant to the curriculum and transfer knowledge and expertise from industry to classroom and vice-versa.”

As a result children and young people gain invaluable  skills and work experience  which help them forge a clearer vision for their future career pathways .

“Through offering a broad and inclusive curriculum which is enhanced through employer engagement and partnerships we  believe that our young people are well prepared for success as they progress from school to tertiary education and the workplace.”

The following document outlines the implementation and outcomes of the project:  Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – Final

Other related documents:

Please refer to the School-Employer Partnership Guidance for further information

Professional learning opportunities for nurturing approaches

  • ‘Applying Nurture as a whole school approach: A Framework to support the self-evaluation of nurturing approaches in schools and early learning and childcare settings’ professional learning is on the 23rd of May from 9.30 am to 12.30 pm in the Optima Building in Glasgow. This will support any school leaders who have begun to look at how they implement and self-evaluate nurturing approaches in their setting. There are still some places available for this training.
  • ‘Nurturing approaches to support the impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences’ professional learning is taking place on the 4th of June from 9.30 to 3.30 pm in Victoria Quay in Edinburgh. This training day is an exciting opportunity to link nurturing approaches to ACEs and to look at how you might adapt your practice to support the needs of children and young people affected by ACEs.
  • If you are interested in attending any of these sessions please contact: Gail.Nowek@educationscotland.gsi.gov.uk

Social Enterprise Opportunity

In support of Year of Young People 2018, Historic Environment Scotland and Social Enterprise Academy have launched a new opportunity for schools and social enterprises, aimed at inspiring young entrepreneurs and promoting Gaelic language. For more information contact kathleen.mclaughlin@hes.scot.

Whole School Approach -reducing the cost of a school day

Child Poverty Action Group has some good practice examples of working with partners in the community including local organisations to help towards reducing the cost of a school day see link below

 http://www.cpag.org.uk/content/it-takes-all-us-whole-school-approach-reducing-costs-school-day

 

Amazing Things – the guide to youth awards

The 4th edition of Amazing Things – the guide to youth awards in Scotland has been launched by the Awards Network to coincide with the 2017 Scottish Learning Festival. Featuring 26 youth award providers and more than double the number of youth awards than the previous edition, it is packed with information that will help young people, educators and employers to learn more about youth awards and how they contribute to young people’s learning, life and work skills development.

Commenting on Amazing Things, Graeme Logan, Chief Inspector of Education, encourages ‘everyone who works with young people – in schools, youth work settings, further education or in the workplace to make best use of this excellent resource’.
In his Foreword to Amazing Things, John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills, highlights the important contribution that youth awards make to raising attainment and to developing key skills valued by employers. Hugh Aitken CBE, CBI Scotland Director, echoes these remarks, commending youth awards for helping young people develop a ‘can do attitude – exactly what we (employers) want to see in the workforce’.
A keynote contribution from Jim Thewliss, General Secretary of School Leaders Scotland, notes how youth awards have developed ‘from curriculum enhancements to fundamental building blocks’.
And from young people themselves:
Graeme – “Gaining my award is an amazing achievement. I have learned so many new skills, met so many new friends and this has boosted my confidence”
Stephanie – “From self-management to making the most of new opportunities (my award) has given me the chance to grow as a person”
Amazing Things features 48 award programmes, many providing multiple levels of progression and almost half delivering formal qualifications. Find out about key award elements, age ranges, distinctive features, skills and competences and links to other awards.
Copies of Amazing Things 4 can be ordered by contacting office@youthscotland.org.uk or downloaded from the Awards Network website.

A different perspective

By Cat Thomson, Senior Development Officer, Enquire

The Young Ambassadors for Inclusion are aged between 12 and 18 and represent 22 of the 32 local authorities in Scotland. The group aims to:

  • Share young people’s views and experiences of inclusion;
  • Raise awareness of Additional Support for Learning with other pupils to reduce stigma and improve understanding;
  • Improve school staffs understanding of inclusion;
  • Work together to develop ways to develop and support inclusive education.

They are supported by Education Scotland, Enquire [the Scottish advice service for additional support for learning] and individual local authority staff.

In June, the young people took their messages about inclusion to the Scottish Cabinet.

“We want to be seen as individuals with our own set of unique strengths and skills.”

These are impressive words from Alistair, one of the Young Ambassadors for Inclusion who met Deputy First Minister and Education Secretary, John Swinney in June to share their views on inclusion and support in school.

During the meeting, 11 members of the group shared findings from their work. They were keen to raise issues they think it is important for policymakers, local authority staff, school leaders, teachers and support staff to hear and reflect on when making decisions about support for pupils with additional support for learning.

One of the first questions the Ambassadors considered was what inclusion means to them. Their comments make for interesting reading. Many of the young people saw inclusion as a positive thing making pupils feeling safe, accepted, and treated equally. Common messages were “everybody [should be] included in education regardless of need”, “being able to work together with a range of people”, “everybody involved, nobody left out” and “not being defined by any difficulties you have”.

A small number of Ambassadors talked about inclusion adding additional pressure to young people but the universal message was how incredibly important it is to young people to feel listened to, understood and supported. Comments included: “It’s good when we are listened to and asked what we need”, and “When staff have an understanding of different additional support needs and can understand certain behaviour it helps them understand why young people may act in a particular way.”

What works less well is when pupils feel excluded or unsupported: “Many class teachers and other staff do not have awareness of additional support needs, what that means for us and how to support in the classroom”, and “Pupils need access to all areas of the school and curriculum.”

A number of pupils wanted to encourage schools to give pupils with additional support needs the same opportunities as other pupils and not to make assumptions about their abilities, highlighting that sometimes trying something and not succeeding is better than not trying.

Key themes

Some of the themes they identified from their work included: raising awareness, friendship and belonging, positive attitude and support.

Raising Awareness

“Whole school awareness of ASN can support much better understanding and reduce stigma and isolation”

“Taking opportunities to share that people are different and you should not make fun of them.”

Ambassadors recommended that all teachers should have training on inclusion and the different types of additional support for learning pupils may have and how this might affect them in school.

They felt more could be done in primary school to raise awareness of additional support for learning and called for zero tolerance of bullying of pupils with additional support needs.

They suggested holding pupil conferences, taking part in national awareness weeks, putting on school assemblies led by pupils, or developing awareness raising days about specific issues such as mental health or LGBT.

Friendship and belonging

“I didn’t really feel part of mainstream school.”

Ambassadors called for schools to help young people feel more confident, build friendships and feel included. Schools should provide opportunities to take part in activities with peers.

Positive Attitudes

“Don’t segregate pupils with needs.”

“It helps to be patient.”

As one Inclusion Ambassador said to John Swinney: “We need to create positive stories about pupils with additional support need rather than focus on the negatives.”

Ambassadors felt schools should focus on raising awareness of the range of reasons a pupil may need support and how this might make a pupil feel in school, while also encouraging a more positive view of additional support needs.

“Supportive teachers in mainstream are crucial”

“Teachers need qualifications to work with pupils with additional support needs and medical needs.”

“Staff off and no replacement really affects learning”

Making it easy for pupils to ask for help and offer the right support

Sharing information about how pupils can ask for help and having supportive and empathetic teachers who can support pupil’s emotional issues was highlighted as helpful to encourage young people to ask for help when they need it.

Ambassadors stressed the importance of schools listening to pupils about the type of support they wanted in school. They also highlighted the impact of crucial support not being available to help them get the most out of school, with many reporting support had been reduced due to budget cuts. Others shared experiences of inconsistent staffing, and highlighted the impact this had on their learning and school experience.

Ambassadors encouraged schools to have a range of options for collected pupils views, including focus groups and questionnaires.

What next?

The Young Ambassadors for Inclusion are planning to create a pledge that schools can use to demonstrate their commitment to inclusion. They will also be involved in developing a support pack for schools, including a short film to raise awareness of inclusion, the range of additional support needs and the impact on pupils and their families.

This article also appears in August’s Children in Scotland magazine.

www.enquire.org.uk @ASLadvice

Western Isles Council – extensive apprenticeship offer

Comhairle nan Eilean Siar and partners will publish an extensive list of over 40 apprenticeships which will see posts created from the Butt to Barra, across a wide range of sectors and departments including:

  • Business Administration
  • Business Management
  • Community Development
  • Child Care
  • Education Attainment
  • Gaelic language assistants
  • Health and Social Care
  • Heritage
  • Human Resource
  • Multi-Media
  • Outdoor/Indoor Education
  • Roads maintenance
  • Sustainable Resource Management
  • Sport and health
  • Motor Mechanics

The Comhairle will be hosting community meetings throughout the Western Isles to provide full information on the above apprentices. Dates have yet to be confirmed but these meetings will take place the week commencing Monday 5th June 2017 and further details will be publicised closer to the time.

Cllr Angus McCormack, Chairman of Education, Sport and Children’s Services, said:       “This is a fantastic opportunity for people from the Butt to Barra to earn whilst they learn, and very importantly – to do so in their own areas. This ties in very well indeed to the Comhairle’s aims to reverse depopulation, provide our people with the opportunity to remain in their communities, whilst also contributing to the economy. I would encourage those who speak Gaelic and also those who have a particular interest in land management and crofting to keep express their interest in these apprenticeships. I would reiterate once again that the apprenticeships are open to anyone, not just young people, and anyone who feels that they may be interested should register at www.myjobscotland.gov.uk and setup an alert for the job category “Modern Apprenticeships/Trainee” where they will receive notifications by e-mail as soon as the Comhairle’s Apprenticeships posts go live.

“The Comhairle is committed to workforce planning and having a sustainable platform for the future, to help our communities and our islands to flourish and we will continue to work hard to ensure that we achieve these aims.”

DYW Interesting Practice – Calderglen High School: Inspirational learning delivered in partnership

Calderglen High School has established far-reaching partnerships to deliver inspirational learning opportunities for young people.  The school’s strategic approach to Developing the Young Workforce ensures that all faculties actively collaborate with partners to develop and deliver a curriculum that supports the development of pupils’ employability and career management skills.
Calderglen has radically overhauled its curriculum to meet more appropriately the needs of all learners and to prepare young people for the opportunities, jobs and career pathways.  Using labour market information and incorporating work-based learning opportunities are central to providing learners with experiences that inspire career aspirations and realistic progression pathways.

Find out more about the school’s approach to career education through:

The following videos inspire thinking about the work at Calderglen High School: