Category Archives: Skills

DYW and Outdoor Learning

At Castlemilk Day Nursery DYW features as an integral part of the learning and teaching alongside literacy, numeracy and health & wellbeing. The Nursery employs a variety of approaches to allow their children to link the skills they are developing to the world of work, challenging gender stereotyping alongside.

Through outdoor learning children at Nursery have opportunity to explore and develop a wide variety of transferable skills across all curriculum areas. Using for example prompt cards and key questions children become aware of key professions and the skills required for these . This is reinforced through our joint up ventures with business and other local nurseries, primary and secondary schools. The Nursery is looking to promote skills for work, life and learning through role-playing , currently they have a focus on the veterinary sector. Children undertake a variety of roles and this helps them to understand the range of different skills that are necessary in the world of work.

Central to embedding DYW across all aspects of learning was the engagement of staff in professional dialogue and partnership working with employers. The Head Teacher and the staff have been working on resources that ensure that the Career Education Standards 3-18 is embedded within the curriculum.

Job Profile

A key priority of the nursery was to support children’s knowledge and understanding of the skills they were learning and relating these to the world of work The skills that the children explored are:

Responsibility/thinking

Teamwork/leadership

Creativity/self confidence

Physical wellbeing

Resilience

These where broken down into achievable “I can” statements for children and linked to the Career Education Standards 3-18. Staff had previously taken part in outdoor training within the local community woods and shared photographs of the learning with the children. The children were encouraged to share the skills that they could identify which included “helping”, “showing” and “talking” and relate these to their daily nursery routine and the wider world of work.. This was a shared learning approach which had positive implications for both staff and children’s learning. The nursery has taken the first steps to building on employee partnerships, developing the young workforce through joined up ventures and sustaining lifelong learning for all. The children really enjoy outdoors and the benefits which it brings. Having a woodland area within our nursery outdoor area we have been able to support and enhance the learning opportunities to support developing the young force through the children’s newly acquired transferable skills.

Staff and children have the opportunity to look at various experiences and outcomes through interdisciplinary learning. Skills for learning, life and work is an integral part of the planning and this ensures these are embedded within the curriculum experiences. Castlemilk has now made contact with wider industries such as house builders, catering agencies, generation programmes and engineering companies who are willing to support in sharing skills with our children

Castlemilk Day Nursery will continue to develop the young workforce approach within their daily practice and within their planning. They will work on joined up ventures with local nurseries, primaries, secondary schools and other education providers sharing skills and knowledge. This will support their children in developing their skills and open up many opportunities to embed DYW within the learning and teaching of the nursery.

Transferable skills and DYW

Karen Henderson, Head Teacher says: “The initial idea came from linking staff CPD training with our community “Wellie Wanders” group which our children take part in weekly. Staff were also able to link their experiences to the “Outdoor learning” documentation and “My world outdoors” resources which are embedded within Castlemilk Day Nursery”

“I liked climbing on the trees with Ella. I climbed really high. Then climbed down again” Josh, age 4yrs

“I learned to build a den with sticks, leaves and tarpaulin. I like playing in the mud. I like everything outside” Tommy, age 4yrs

Yokerburn Early Years

Extended day centre within Yoker area of North West Glasgow. Nursery caters for children from 0–5 years from a multitude of cultural, social, economic and learning backgrounds.

The establishment has been raising awareness of job roles within local community by working with a range of different partners . This inspires the children and provides an early introduction into the world of work.  The children have been working with a local care home to build up confidence and familiarity of the world of work. The children have experienced several different roles within the care home including: nursing, cooking, hair and beauty and table set-up . This is a fantastic opportunity for the children to gain a real insight into the world of work.

The project has grown and the children have had several engagements with the organisation:

Sustainability
They have been working with the care home to grow products. This project is in conjunction with another partner Dumbarton Environmental Trust. The project is helping the children to improve their understanding of science but also introducing a wide range of different career options.

Remembrance Day
They joined the care home residents on Remembrance Day and the children made their own poppies to commemorate the occasion. This was another opportunity for the residents to discuss their own lives with our children.

We have other experiences available to our children:

Parental Employability Sessions
We have encouraged our parents to become involved in our employability events and we have had several successful parental QA sessions. This allows the children to experience these skills from some familiar faces.

Fruit Stall
This project has allowed our children to learn employability skills in a real-life context. The children are involved in all aspects of the enterprise activity and have had hands on experience in the following:

Health and hygiene
Money handling
Stock control

They also produce a survey on what products are selling the best and plan their purchases accordingly.

Community Police Visit
The children had a visit from the community police, this was another opportunity to showcase a positive role model . They had a QA session and had the opportunity to ask a wide range of diverse questions.

“The effective incorporation of simple counting, matching and comparison tasks into the conversation encouraged early numeracy skills and the reciprocal question and answers and new vocabulary in context developed early literacy skills for our children in a real and meaningful way. Our childen have been extremely engaged during visits to Quayside with older residents and we have recognised that often adults can underestimate children’s abilities in terms of empathy and awareness. We have had statements from Quayside about increased motivation, interest and engagement by some residents and there really is an observable connection between the regular visitors. Promoting the world of work is allowing our children to access early knowledge of the wide range of different career pathways. We are building on our local partners and will continue to actively promote the positive impact of early introduction to the world of work” Mary Gallacher, Head Teacher

Next Steps
We will continue to work with local partners and strengthen links with the local community.

“We have noticed a surge of energy and increase in physical activity for some of our residents when they know the children will be visiting” Anne from Quayside

Bo’ness Academy-Partners and the Community

Bo’ness has designed a clear strategy and has well-established approaches to developing in its young people skills for learning, life and work. The strategy involves establishing local, regional and partnerships to provide real- life contexts for learning. Curriculum leaders are using partners to provide a context to the learning and an insight of the working environment. Young people find this to be motivational and are enjoying the skills led curriculum.

 

Bo’ness are using their expanding partners to meet the needs of all learners and to prepare young people for the pathways which are likely to exist for them in the future. The curriculum has had a complete overhaul to establish a more wide ranging approach to the skills agenda.

The partnership and community approach at Bo’ness Academy is a key strategy for promoting skills development across all curriculum areas. The school is using a wide range of partners and community based projects to promote the importance of the skills agenda. Bo’ness Academy are using the skills agenda to push attainment and to foster a community approach throughout the school.  Bo’ness Academy are using their expanding partners to provide a curriculum that provides a framework to support all young people.

Community Café
This is a project that has been used effectively to support young people who are disengaged. The project is now well established and is supporting the local community. The school has fostered links with local partners to provide the school and the local community with a fully functioning and efficient café. The young people involved are provided with the opportunity to learn new skills relevant to the workplace and qualifications that are recognised in the sector(Health & Hygiene)

YPI
This is targeted at the S4 cohort and has been very successful at engaging the young people at the school. The groups use their own unique skillset to produce a presentation on their agreed research topic. The young people felt that their skills for work, life and learning had improved and in particular they had more confidence in making informed decisions. The groups have used local community as their focus and had fostered links with the local charities such as the Bo’ness Storehouse food bank

Children’s University
This was another established partnership link that been very successful, the young people believed it had motivated them across the whole school. They spoke of the skills that they had developed during the programme. The school have developed their strategy this year to include the P6 cohort in their local feeder Primary schools. They felt that this approach would further develop their strong links with the local community and give the P6 another opportunity to work with the school. The school use the profiling tool developed by Children’s University but also feed the information into the existing profiling model in the school. The school have used PEF to support the course and target the participants through SIMD. The project has further developed links with INEOS, they have provided Inspiration visits to their workplace and are now working closely with the school on a sustainability project around the plastic journey which will be used as IDL across the school curriculum areas.

STEM@Helix
This was a targeted programme organised through the DYW Forth Valley group which provided the young people with the opportunity to work with others. They worked in teams to develop a model display. The young people felt that it allowed them to have more focus on STEM and to work in a real-life context. The young people also go the opportunity to meet the Queen at the award ceremony which gave them a real sense of achievement.

Forth Ports Discovery Week
This was a targeted programme but was very successful. The young people had the opportunity to visit a local employer and spend a week working with a wide range of departments. The programme was activity focused and the young people had the opportunity to work with some of the technical equipment. They had the opportunity to discuss the workplace with Modern Apprentices which they said helped to provide an overview to the wide range of different career pathways. The young people were surprised by the sheer size of the company and the opportunities that they could provide.

School/College Partnership
The school has long-standing partnerships with the local college. The school has a SCOTS course which offers young people a taster course, this allows the young people to experience a wide range of different areas before they take an extra block in their chosen field. This along with the introduction of the Foundation Apprenticeship programme are providing the young people with an opportunity to experience college. The school will begin to provide the FA programme for Business and Accounts at the school in the new academic year.

Balfour Beatty(STEM)
This a targeted programme to encourage young people to look at STEM as a possible career pathways. The young people were tasked with designing a building that maintained heat. They had a mentor and visited buildings and structures to understand the project context. The culmination of the project was a presentation to explain their design. The young people involved felt that the experience had given them a real insight into the careers available in the STEM sector.

Young people are experiencing a curriculum in which they are developing more career related skills and learning more about growth sectors and the career pathways that may be available to them post-school. The use of career pathways and partners are ensuring that the young people are motivated and have the skills required to make informed career choices which is improving the positive destinations.

Staff are able to use their own expertise to help the young people make these informed decisions.  We have found that by providing young people with more opportunities to work with partners that they have more motivation to look at their long term career pathways. Partners are able to use a real context to show how important the skills that we introduce in school are in progressing a career journey.

Involving partners in the school community has highlighted a range of career pathways that our young people were not aware existed. Having DYW as a focus for staff Career Long Professional Learning has helped to highlight across the whole school community of the importance of introducing young people early to skills for work, life and learning.

Our curriculum review meetings have an important role to play in the development of our young people. The review allows young people to discuss their career pathway with a wide range of different of inputs including parents/carers. This wide ranging approach gives the young person to reflect on their learning, achievements and future career pathways

We focused on local partners as this allowed us to foster a community approach which we believe is the best way forward for the school. We are superbly supported by DYW Forth Valley.
Our next step is to provide more opportunities within the existing school timetable that allows all of the learners the opportunity to undertake a wider range of skills. This will include the FA programmes that our own staff will lead in the new academic year

Quotes
‘The importance of DYW cannot be underestimated as it’s vital that we prepare and equip our young people with the skills for life, learning and work. Within our school all young people have opportunities for appropriate work placements during their time at Bo’ness Academy. This has to be both “real” and appropriate in order for our young people to gain maximum benefit from these opportunities.’ Head Teacher Steve Dougan

‘Moving forward our focus is to continue exploring opportunities for pupils and ensuring we have a curriculum in place that best supports the needs of Bo’ness Academy pupils. We aim to continue forging links with local employers and continuing to strengthen the partnership with DYW Forth Valley. An emphasis will be placed on the consistent delivery across the school of the career education standard and how pupils identify and record the skills they develop across the school.’ DYW Lead Ross Latimer

‘Encourages me to do more outside of school’
Hannah Waugh S2

‘I didn’t know there was so many different jobs’
Jay Brown S5

Young Enterprise ‘Tenner Programme’ contributes to SQA Personal Development Awards

SQA and Young Enterprise Scotland have been working together to demonstrate how the Tenner Challenge could generate evidence that meets the assessment standards of some SQA units.

Young Enterprise Scotland’s Tenner Challenge, in which participants make as much profit as possible from £10, provides an interactive way for learners to develop employability skills. The Tenner Challenge helps learners to develop skills including creativity, resilience and problem solving.

This document and case study outline how the Tenner Challenge could generate evidence that meets the assessment standards for the SQA units Personal Development: Self and Work (H18P 44) and Enterprise Activity (D36N 10).

Once evidence has been gathered via the Tenner Challenge, centres will have to check learners’ work against the Assessment Standards for the SQA units. The examples provided here illustrate the type of activities and evidence that are likely to generate appropriate evidence.

The contribution that Young Enterprise’s Tenner Challenge offers, in terms of evidence, will also depend on the range of activities that are being undertaken.

All evidence must be subject to rigorous assessment procedures and internal verification.

Academy 9 Project – National Conference, 19 and 20 March 2019

You are invited to the first Academy9 ‘Building a Legacy’ conference – inspired by the A9 Dualling Programme.

 The interactive event will showcase the award-winning Academy9
Programme, which has seen industry educate and inspire thousands
of young people from Perth to Inverness in STEM (Science,
Technology, Engineering and Mathematics).

We will lift the lid on the secrets of its success to inspire others. Selected workshop highlights include:

    • Enhancing Construction Safety – Digital Careers now and the future; Harnessing Digital Technology
    • Creating Effective Educational Programme
    • Delivering the STEM Education Strategy for Scotland
    • Developing and Keeping a Skilled Workforce – ‘New Industry in Scotland 2020′
    • Enhancing Construction Safety – Digital Careers now and the future; Harnessing Digital Technology

More information here:   TS Academy9 Conference 2019 A5 Flyer WEB

New NHSScotland Careers Resource pack now available!

NHS Education for Scotland has developed an NHSScotland Careers Resource pack which is fresh out of the box and ‘ready to go’! The pack contains a ready-made set of lessons with everything you need for a one-off lesson or a full Unit of five lessons.

The pack contains:   A comprehensive booklet called ‘A Career for You in Health’ which is a guide to every job family in NHSScotland. This booklet contains everything pupils need to know about entry requirements, skills, values and much more for each job role.

An NHSScotland Careers teaching unit with resources for use in one-to-one career guidance, group sessions, drop-in clinics and events like parents’ evenings. These include:

  • ready-made slide packs e.g. ‘Introduction to NHSScotland’
  • a ‘word bank’ with vocabulary for use in CVs or to support understanding of NHSscotland job advertisements
  • job profiles for a variety of job roles in NHSScotland, from gardener to doctor, from midwife to IT engineer!
  • engaging pupil resources including quizzes and creative activities

To ensure that the learning is relevant for use in schools, the resource pack aligns with

  1. The Career Education Standard 3-18
  2. Curriculum for Excellence: Health and Wellbeing Experiences and Outcomes
  3. SDS Career Management Skills framework

A job family leaflet showing all NHSScotland job families ‘at a glance’ which could be used with individuals, small groups, classes or at events such as parents’ evenings.

Look no further for a source of information and materials about NHSScotland careers!

Download the pack today at:  http://bit.ly/2zYdLYL

All you need to know about Founders4Schools

What is Founders 4 Schools:

  • A free online platform to help you find people from the world of work willing to engage with your school and share their knowledge with your pupils.
  • Our system filters speakers to ensure they meet the needs of your school.
  • Communications with speakers are undertaken through a secure online platform that saves you time and helps to ensure the highest quality speakers.
  • We also automate support communications on logistics and administration to further lighten the load.

How it helps teachers:

  • Makes it easy to link school students with people from the world of work.
  • Industry links that help support specific curricular developments such as STEM, Maths, Modern Languages and the Developing the Young Workforce agenda as a whole.
  • As a CPD opportunity using our Teacher Insight Event type.
  • Find speakers for “world of work” days.
  • By supporting careers and employment related PSE programmes through free resources and lesson plans.
  • Prepare for Inspection by providing access to high quality, research informed resources and practice.
  • Impact positively on Post 16 destinations.

Benefits for pupils:

  • Awareness of the world of work
  • Inspirational encounters
  • Employability experiences that support UCAS applications (particularly in key areas such as STEM).
  • A good knowledge of local employment opportunities.
  • Preparation for the transition to employment.

What to expect:

  • Research the encounter types available in Scotland, all of which have full curricular mapping available to download, by looking at our Educator page.
  • Book an event for the young people at your school! Just type in the postcode of your school to get started and connect with local business leaders.
  • Once the event has been submitted you can login to your account and get live updates on your events using your Teacher Dashboard.
  • You can use your Teacher Dashboard to email business volunteers as well. Starting a conversation with them is crucial to building up a relationship, and ensuring a successful event.
  • Don’t forget to look at your Event Page! Links to this will be available in your dashboard and are a really useful to share information about your event on social media, and also just very useful to print off and leave with the school office for the day of the event itself.
  • You can always check out our Educator’s Tips page for further advice.

Next steps:

  • Take a look at our website and explore the opportunities available for you and the young people you teach.
  • If you have any queries we’d love to hear from you. scotland@founders4schools.org.uk

TES feature: Primary career education should broaden children’s horizons

By Nick Chambers for TES

The focus for primary schools shouldn’t be on ‘careers advice’ but on ‘career-related learning’, argues Nick Chambers

The last few months have seen a sudden enthusiasm for careers education in primary schools. Of course, it is a simple and seductive idea.
But many teachers and parents have expressed their concerns that we risk making our children grow up too fast. They are understandably concerned about the dangers in directing children towards a particular career or job at a time when their aspirations should be wide-ranging and, in large part, without boundaries.
I share their concerns. We should not be providing careers advice in primary schools: instead we should focus on broadening horizons and raising aspirations, giving children a wide range of experiences including the world of work. It is about opening doors, showing children the vast range of possibilities and helping to keep their options open for as long as possible.
And there are a range of attributes, skills and behaviours that can be encouraged in this early stage of a child’s life that will leave them in the best possible position as they begin their transitions to secondary education and to future life.
There is often alarm, too, when people hear or read the word ‘careers’ in the same sentence as primary schools. In my opinion, the focus for primary schools shouldn’t be on ‘careers advice’ but on what I refer to as ‘career-related learning’.
Teachers would tend to agree. Our recent survey, in partnership with Tes and the NAHT headteachers’ union, found that the majority of teachers believe that children should be learning about the world of work and different jobs in their first years of primary school. Nearly half (47 per cent) believed this should start from age five and under and that linking learning to the real world helped increase motivation, broaden aspirations and challenge gender stereotypes.
Politicians, too, are on side. Robert Halfon MP, chair of the Commons Education Select Committee was spot on in saying in Tes recently: “The impact of early engagement can have a hugely positive impact on wider academic attainment, motivating and inspiring both children and their families, by helping them to see a future to which they can aspire and which feels achievable.”
Earlier this year we tried to explore this a little further by exploring who primary-aged children ideally want to become, and, what shapes (and often limits) their career aspirations and dreams for the future. Drawing the Future asked children aged 7 to 11 to draw a picture of the job they wanted to do when they grew up. More than 13,000 children took part in the UK and it was clear that, from a young age, many children had ideas about careers. Some 36 per cent of children from as young as seven years old, based their career aspirations on people they knew. For those who didn’t know anyone who did the job they drew, 45 per cent stated that TV, film and radio were the biggest factors influencing their choice.
Meanwhile, less than 1 per cent of children knew about a job from someone visiting their school. This has huge implications for social mobility, as children from poorer backgrounds may not have access to successful role models from the world of work and their aspirations are limited as a result.
All children, regardless of their background should get the chance to meet a wide range of people doing different jobs, in different sectors and at different levels – from apprentices to CEOs.
This is essential if we are to improve social mobility and gender and ethnic equality. It is vital we support children to challenge the perceptions they may have about certain jobs, and to better understand the evolving world they are growing up in while they are still in primary school.
While teachers appreciate the importance to children of career-related learning many say that the lack of time and availability of volunteers are preventing them doing more. The NAHT has taken a lead to tackle this and created Primary Futures in partnership with my charity, Education and Employers.

Emma Fieldhouse from South Parade Primary school in Wakefield explains why her school got involved: “It was amazing to see the children talking and listening to the volunteers, and each other, as they begin to make the link between what they do in school every day and the exciting world of the future where they will be the next scientists, teachers, politicians, vets”.
We must not rest until we see this kind of ambition running through all of our students in all of our primary schools.

Nick Chambers is the founder and chief executive officer of the charity Education and Employers. The charity runs Inspiring the Future and its Primary Futures and Inspiring Women programmes and undertakes research into the effectiveness of employer engagement

Foundation Apprenticeships: Preparing Young People for the World of Work

Foundation Apprenticeships offer young people valuable work-based learning opportunities to develop their skills and employer connections  in order to build their future career pathways.

Learners will now have the option to select a Foundation Apprenticeship as one of their senior phase subject choices and complete the qualification over one or two years in collaboration with local learning provider, such as a college and with an employer.

Skills Development Scotland has developed the Foundation Apprenticeship programme, in partnership with education and industry, which now feature  on the senior phase curriculum in most secondary schools in Scotland.  Young people can select a Foundation Apprenticeship as one of their subject choices and complete the qualification over one or two years, usually starting in S5 or S6 . This provides them  with a real, practical work placement which will give their career a head start and looks great on their CV.
A Foundation Apprenticeship is a chance to try a career out  to decide if it’s right for them.  Whatever young people want to do after school – straight into work, onto a Modern or Graduate Apprenticeship or to college or university – a Foundation Apprenticeship can open up their options.

Watch this clip to find out more about FAs:  youtube.com/scottishapprenticeship

Foundation Apprenticeships are designed by employers to ensure the qualification and skills young people develop throughout are what are needed for the world of work. Employers therefore help shape the next generation of talent and build the skills they require for their future career pathways .   At the same time Foundation Apprenticeships allow employers to spot talented, motivated learners who could become their future employees.

For more information on Foundation Apprenticeships visit  apprenticeships.scot/foundation or follow  @apprentice_scot .

FA PowerPoint presentation: FA Presentation

Download an overview of the key aspects of FAs here:  foundation-apprenticeships-positioning-doc-august-2018

Young Enterprise Scotland – News

Earlier this year our Bridge 2 Business Programme joined forces with Heehaw, to bring an exciting competition and opportunity for Edinburgh College Students.

The competition gave Edinburgh College students the opportunity to win a paid work placement, and valuable experience in the industry of animation, film & television. This opportunity also gave students the chance to develop their skills, which hopefully would secure them a job in the future or give real inspiration to start up their own business!

Earlier this week, we got news from HeeHaw that the students who won the competition through Bridge2Business, have in fact gained employment within the industry. We had 40 students apply for the placement, which was then narrowed down to a top ten, and ultimately two won a paid placement!

 

#collaboration is a core value of everything we do and stand for at Young Enterprise Scotland you can imagine how pleased we are to be working with VIBES – Scottish Environment Business Awards.

Businesses in Scotland are taking significant steps to improve or reduce their impact on the environment, often saving money in the process. The VIBES are held each year to recognise and showcase best practice.

The VIBES – Scottish Environment Business Awards are a partnership between Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), The Scottish Government, Energy Saving Trust, Highland & Islands Enterprise, Scottish Enterprise, Scottish Water, Zero Waste Scotland and the 20:20 Climate Group. We were delighted to showcase our work via young people from Lochend Community School in Glasgow as well as being the charity partner at the lunch receiving over £1600 to help continue our work.

As we approach the end of Scotland’s Year of Young People we can look back with warmth at the role that Young Enterprise Scotland has played, and we will join a celebration event on 3rd December to showcase the legacy if the year’s activity.

The one key takeaway for Young Enterprise Scotland has been improved co-creation and engagement with young people to help shape our programmes for young people in the future.

This was to the fore this week as we held focus groups with our current group of Pathway Programme participants to use their knowledge of issues and challenges they face to help us shape a future enterprise programme fit for purpose and meeting the beneficiary needs – putting the customer at the heart of your business