Category Archives: Responsibility of All

The Big Pedal 20th – 31st March 2017

The Big Pedal is our UK wide inter-school scooting and cycling challenge, where schools compete to try to get the largest percentage of pupils, staff and parents travelling to school by two wheels.

the-big-pedal

 

Details:

This year’s challenge will be running from March 20th – 31st. It is open to primary and secondary schools who register and then log their data each day.  Schools with the highest participation win great prizes.

Schools can choose to enter a 1 or 5 day challenge where their best day or best 5 days out of the two weeks count. On the final day of the challenge we encourage schools to run a Superhero Day, where pupils dress themselves and their bikes as superheroes.

This year’s theme is Around the World in 10 Days and schools will track their progress on a wall chart – register using the link below –  learning about the countries and cities they pass through along the way.

Information and registration is at http://bigpedal.org.uk/.

The value:

We see the challenge as a great way to get whole school communities excited about active travel and to impact school traffic issues.

 

Red Nose Day 24th March 2017

https://www.rednoseday.com/schools

17fr_140716_0512

Red Nose Day is back on Friday 24th March 2017. Thousands of schools across the country will be getting involved and making their laugh matter.

Comic Relief has designed lots of learning resources and fundraising activities for teachers in nursery, primary and secondary schools.

There are  films, assemblies, learning resources, tutor time activities and an interactive story to make Red Nose Day come to life in the classroom.

How is your school getting involved?

To get involved go to www.rednoseday.com/schools and order your free fundraising pack.

Follow @rednosedaysch for fundraising tips, ideas and lots of fun!

 

Money in a digital age

Teachers can put digital technologies at the heart of great learning in financial education by using a variety of software applications to

  • Keep financial records
  • Analyse information
  • Assess value for money
  • Prepare and use budgets
  • Make informed financial decisions
  • Simulate real life scenarios
  • Find specialist advice and information
  • Communicate with advisors and specialists

In an ‘enterprise context’ a number of schools have used and encouraged their young people to manage the finances of their healthy eating tuck shops by using ‘Excel’ on Glow.    A Fife school has used the software to manage cash flow, stock control and profit calculations.

At a personal level this can be exemplified by using a resource such as Money Talks, Family Finances which examines the inter-related finances of an extended family.   The on-line bank statements are based on ‘Excel Spreadsheets’ and young people can see  how changes in expenditure and income affect the end of month balance.  Items of expenditure can be more deeply researched using the Internet to compare best value for a range of goods and services.  This  links closely to the use of loyalty cards and text alerts which a number of banks and supermarkets use to keep customers informed of additional services being offered.  Other online services and technologies that young people should be aware of are

    • Paypal
    • Contactless technologies
    • Foreign currency conversion tables
    • Peer to peer lending
    • Crowd source funding and financing
    • Just giving – online support for charities
    • Paying or donating by text messaging – many organisations use this for television charity appeals.
    • Transport apps – Lothian buses is good example.
    • Wearable technologies

Government agencies also encourage the use of digital technologies for claiming benefits and the payment of taxes such as the ‘Vehicle or Road Tax’.

There are a range of potential risks to the use of digital that need to be recognised. In particular young people should be given the opportunity to discuss

  • Gambling apps
  • Pay day lending
  • Illegal streaming of videos and music
  • Digital security and keeping money safe
  • ‘Phishing scams’ involving email
  • Identity theft
  • Recognising secure sites

One of the main areas of risk is around the abstract nature of money and this may be an issue given that children and young people have access to mobile technology at a very early age.

 

Financial Education, Numeracy and Mathematics

The ability to work with numbers is an essential part of being financially capable. This has been recognised recently in a number of support materials recently published by Education Scotland. The first of these is the National Numeracy and Progression Framework. This includes a progression pathway on money (linked to the experiences and outcomes for money in Curriculum for Excellence) One of the key aspects of this framework is the concept of understanding finance in a digital world.

As well this there is also a set of benchmarks that will support teachers in assessing learning. These Benchmarks were published in August 2016 as draft documents. There is currently an online consultation which can be accessed via the National Improvement Hub. This consultation will close on 31.3.17 and the final Benchmarks will be published in June 2017.

There are many activities that will support young people’s learning across a number of different levels to ensure that financial education can provide memorable experiences and powerful messages. In a number of practical situations the following opportunities can be provided

  • budgeting
  • investigating value for money
  • deciding on costings for design and manufacture
  • discussing types of bank cards and costs involved
  • designing coins/notes – shapes, patterns, etc
  • taking part in money games
  • investigating exchange rates
  • discussing various methods of payment and costs involved
  • using tally sheets and producing graphs/pictograms
  • engaging with money transactions – different combinations of coins and notes
  • comparing prices
  • using Automated Teller Machines (ATM) and other ‘money’ machines
  • calculating profit/loss

In addition to this engaging with numeracy and mathematics helps young people make the jump from dealing with concrete examples to the much more abstract nature of ‘money in the digital age’.

International School Meals Day 2017

International School Meals Day

ismd-2017

Thursday 9th March 2017

http://www.internationalschoolmealsday.com/

ismd-2017-school_flyer

International School Meals Day encourages children and young people around the world to connect and talk to each other about the food they eat and the role that it plays in their lives.

In 2017 the theme is Food, Culture and Heritage

Share your food stories & be part of a global event

Join our Glow meets on the day!

Sign up to take part here

https://eventpub.meet.glowscotland.org.uk/content/connect/c1/7/en/events/catalog.html?OWASP_CSRFTOKEN=8ec01637b0ce39321b206037c84528a06bc9e77f041e5094f5ab81b890fa81a9

The way that food is cultivated, prepared and consumed is an expression of culture and heritage. This year’s theme provides an opportunity for pupils to express themselves through the food and associated traditions that form an important part of their identity.

In the run up to International School Meals Day we want pupils from around the world to share their food stories through whichever medium they wish

pictures / posters / videos / poems / stories / dance /drama

The approach that you take to getting pupils to think about their culture and heritage and its associated food traditions is up to each individual school and classroom. However, here are some quick ideas of how ISMD can be celebrated:

  1. Deliver one-minute talks or videos about favourite meals and national traditions
  2. Have an International Menu Day
  3. Have food tasting sessions or other fun food activities
  4. Fundraising activities for charities to support school feeding programmes in developing countries
  5. Incorporate global citizenship and food culture into classroom learning
  6. Have sessions on the theme of ‘food’, with extracts from favourite poems and stories
  7. Skype – teachers and students can skype with another school around the world to share their experience of food, culture and heritage.

Stories and pictures will be shared on the ISMD website and on Twitter so be sure and follow

@IntSchoolMeals and use the hashtag #ISMD2017.

 

 

Financial Education – powerful messages and memorable experiences

Much has been done over the past ten years or so to improve the quality and quantity of the financial education delivered in our schools. This has been achieved by working across the financial, education and cultural sectors to raise the status and profile of financial education but also to improve the confidence of teachers to address the issues in this area of the curriculum.  The main reasons for a continued focus on financial education are the ever changing economic, political, social and environmental issues that continue to have a wide-ranging impact on all our lives.  These contexts are a central feature of  ‘learning for sustainability’ . Financial education has an important role in tackling poverty, reducing financial and social exclusion and improving the employability skills of all our young people. This will benefit both the individual and society in general.

Financial education is about helping young people meet the financial and economic challenges, now and particularly in ‘post-Brexit Britain’. The best way to do this to make sure they receive powerful messages about money and their experiences in and out of the classroom are memorable. Economics, politics and philosophy are at the heart of the development of financial capability underpinned by numeracy and literacy skills. It should be recognised that developing financial skills will make a contribution to an individual’s economic wellbeing which in turn improves physical, mental, emotional and social wellbeing.   Issues such as

  • High levels of personal debt (including student debt)
  • Increasingly sophisticated financial products
  • Pay day and other high cost lending
  • ‘Food banks’ and increasing levels of poverty
  • High pressure advertising particularly around gambling
  • Pension regulation
  • Probable increase and fluctuations in interest rates
  • Changes to taxes and benefits

mean that there is an even greater need for individuals to take a much more active and informed interest in their own financial futures. Low levels of financial capability can be a cause and a symptom of poverty with the resulting impact on all aspects of health and wellbeing. It is really important that schools work with a range of stakeholders including credit unions to improve the financial skills of our young people.

Developing Gaelic literacy skills

Tuesday 7th February, Balnain House, Inverness; 09.15  – 17.00 Tutor: Roddy MacLean

Are you interested in developing your skills in editing and proof-reading Gaelic texts?  If so, this professional learning opportunity may be of interest to you.  It includes a focus on grammar and writing conventions.  For more information, or to register for the course, email John Storey, at the Gaelic Books Council.

Sgilean Sgrìobhaidh is Deasachaidh Gàidhlig airson nan Gnìomhachasan Cruthachail

Dimàirt 7 an Gearran, Balnain House, Inbhir Nis. 09.15 – 17.00 Neach-teagaisg: Ruairidh MacIlleathain

A bheil ùidh agad ann an obair-deasachaidh ceangailte ri leabhraichean no foillseachaidhean eile?  Ma tha, ‘s dòcha gum bi ùidh agad anns a’ chùrsa ùr seo.  Airson tuilleadh fiosrachaidh, no airson clàradh, cuiribh brath gu John Storey, Ceannard Litreachais agus Foillseachaidh.

Ski lessons for those in GME and GLE

The Gaelic organisation, Comunn na Gàidhlig (CNAG) aims to give children and young people opportunities to use and apply their Gaelic skills in situations beyond school. CNAG are currently offering ski lessons through the medium of Gaelic at Nevis Range, Glenshee, The Lecht, Glen Coe and Cairn Gorm. For more information, please contact fios@spors.scot or phone 01463-234138.

Tha CNAG a’ tabhann leasanan sgithidh do dh’òigridh. Tha iad ri fhaighinn aig gach ionad sgithidh ann an Alba (Monadh Nibheis, Gleann Sìth, An Leac, Gleann Comhann agus An Càrn Gorm).

Gheibhear tuilleadh fiosrachaidh bho fios@spors.scot no 01463 234138. 

Career Education Standard 3 – 18: Suite of Learning Resources

A suite of learning resources are currently being produced to  career standardssupport professional  development related to career education.  These resources  will cover a variety of key themes such as labour market information, career management skills, enterprise and entrepreneurship, My world of Work etc. and relate this to Career Education Standard 3-18.

Learning outcomes

As a result of engaging with this learning you will have:

  • an understanding of the purpose and aim of the Career Education Standard (3 – 18) (CES);
  • an understanding of the part you are expected to play, along with partners, in the implementation of the CES;
  • an understanding of the entitlements for children and young people;
  • developed, through self-evaluation, your understanding of the CES expectations in relation to your current practice;
  • identified areas of the CES expectations for your professional learning; and
  • a plan to take forward manageable changes to your practice.

Who is this learning for?

The resource  contribute to professional learning for practitioners at all levels working with children and young people within early learning and childcare, primary, secondary, special schools, colleges, private training providers, third sector providers, social work, community learning and development and other specialist learning providers including secure and residential settings.

LERANRING RESOURCES

Learning Resource 1:  An Introduction to the Career Education Standard 3-18

This resource introduces you to the standard, its context, purpose and expectations in a logical and manageable format. The materials include a self-evaluation tool and contain references to How good is our school? (4th Edition). Engaging with this professional learning resource will help you build on your existing practice.

Downloads :

Learning Resource 2:   Introduction to the Labour Market Information (LMI)

This resource offers  introductory level learning  to LMI and how this can be accessed and used to support learning and the development of career management skills (CMS) in  relation to the Career Education Standard.  It is structured to begin to inform and to help you reflect on your existing practice.

Download: lr2-intro-to-labour-market-information

Learning Resources 3:   Introduction to Career Management Skills

This resource helps to familiarize practitioners with CMS and how this can be used in wider context of learning and teaching.  It relates directly to the entitlements set out in the CES.

Downloads:

The following resources are currently in development

  • Learning Resources 4:   Introduction to my World of Work
  • Learning Resources 5:   Introduction to Enterprise Education

Creativity: The Big Picture – new Creativity JPEGs available for use in presentations, reports, posters and online.

The following JPEGs and PNGs (with a transparent background) are drawn from the Creativity: The Big Picture infographic available on the National Improvement Hub.

Please use and share the images as widely as possible with educators, learners and partners in presentations, reports, posters and online.

You can also build your own infographics from scratch using the Everything Is Creative online tool and make your own use of the artwork you see here.