Category Archives: Research

Explorathon is coming!

Explorathon is a set of interactive ‘Meet the Researcher’ events happening all over Scotland on Friday 28th and Saturday 29th September. It’s part of a Europe-wide programme called European Researchers’ Night, there’s a particular emphasis on European funded research but any researchers can take part.
Check out the link below to see what is happening near you!
http://www.explorathon.co.uk/

Impetus – Ready for Work report: The capabilities young people need to find and keep work!

In case you haven’t seen this so far:

This Ready for Work (2014) report, produced by Impetus-PEF in partnership with the Young Foundation and the Social Research Unit at Dartington (SRU), seeks to provide practical answers to the question: how can we help young people be ready for work? The study aims to support those who fund, invest in or provide services to improve the employability of young people – including our main concern, young people from disadvantaged background.  

It identifies six essential capabilities that young people are expected to demonstrate in order to get and keep a job:

Self-awareness, Receptiveness, Drive, being Self-assured, Resilience and being Informed.

The report also reflected on a number of programmes or interventions with a proven record of success, providing valuable thoughts and information as people develop and implement strategies within their respective contexts.

You can access the report here:  2014_09-Ready-for-Work

New release: Review of the implementation of the Career Education Standard (3-18), the Work Placement Standard and Guidance on School/Employer Partnerships

Education Scotland has undertaken a national review on the implementation of the Career Education Standard (3-18) since its release in September 2015.  This  also incorporates reflections on the Work Placements Standard and School/Employer Partnership Guidance.  The report outlines  key strengths identified as part of the review process, exemplifies creativity, innovation and impact and highlights areas of development. We are now working with local authorities across Scotland to identify next steps in how best to support the implementation of the CES 3-18 and enhance embedding the new standards around work placements and school-employer partnerships.

The standards and the guidance were published with the understanding that Education Scotland would evaluate the impact the documents were having, in light of experience and use.  In response a team from Education Scotland visited 29 secondary schools between December 2016 and March 2017. The evidence from nine secondary school inspections and 30 Career Information Advice and Guidance (CIAG) reviews also recorded evidence about the implementation of the standards in secondary schools.  An online survey was established to maximise the participation of as many people and organisations as possible for the review.  In addition, a bespoke survey for employers, delivered on behalf of Education Scotland by the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), attracted further responses. Questions on the review of the standards and guidance were also included in the annual Skills Development Scotland (SDS) Headteachers’ survey.

In summary, the purpose of the review was to ascertain answers to the following questions:

  1. To what extent have the standards and guidance been implemented and has the pace of implementation been sufficient in order to direct the next stage of activity and focus? There was a particular focus on the CES and how it was being implemented in secondary schools, alongside the expansion of the SDS service offer.
  2. Are the standards and guidance ambitious enough to deliver the aspirations of the DYW strategy?

You can access the complete CES Implementation Review – report May 2017.

Erasmus+ Act for Careers Conference, 15th June 2017

We would like to invite you to attend the Glasgow City Council Education Services Erasmus+ Act for Careers Conference on Thursday June 15th  2017, 09.30 – 16.00 at, The Prince’s Trust Wolfson Centre.

Programme Erasmus+ Conference Glasgow

Glasgow City Council and the City of Nuremberg have been collaborating since 2014 under the Erasmus+ European education programme to improving support for young people’s employability skills in their transition from school to work.  The project entitled ‘Act for Careers’ has involved, schools, colleges, employment support teams and businesses to examine and learn from best practice in this field to inform and enhance local/national policy and practice at key transition points in young people’s development of their employability skills.  On March 9th 2017, City of Nuremberg delivered a conference on their findings and collaboration with the City of Glasgow. 

The conference will offer a range of workshops and plenary sessions on learning about the German education system, the benefits of:  international engagement; funded European job shadowing opportunities; enhanced practice on employability skills from school to work and on supporting young people from a refugee background into employment.  Speakers will include the Depute Mayor of Nuremberg, Executive Director of Education Glasgow City Council and project participants from both Glasgow and Nuremberg, including young people from Lochend Community High School.

Registration: Please complete the Erasmus+ ACT Registration Form and return it to by Friday 12th May to: UnitHeadEAL@gdss.glasgow.sch.uk  

 

What keeps you sharp? Over 40 this is for you

what-keeps-you-sharp

What Keeps You Sharp? survey launched

People often think of changes in their thinking skills with age in terms of decline. While some people do experience these changes, others do not.

What Keeps You Sharp? is a nationwide survey being led by researchers at Heriot-Watt University about your beliefs and attitudes to how thinking skills might change with age. They  also want to know if you think there are things we can do to maintain or improve thinking skills as we grow older.

If you’re aged 40 or over and living in the UK you can complete the survey online: http://tinyurl.com/keepingsharp.

 Help  spread the word

They  want to reach as broad an audience as possible, so share within your own networks – email lists, Facebook and other social media.

Anyone on social media can share the links  from @TheAgeingLab and the hashtag #WhatKeepsYouSharp?

Please share the survey among your friends and family and any groups you might be associated with.

Why is creativity important to employers? – new Creativity JPEGs available for use in presentations, reports, posters and online.

The following JPEGs and PNGs (with a transparent background) are drawn from the Why is  creativity important to employers? infographic available on the National Improvement Hub.

Please use and share the images as widely as possible with educators, learners and partners in presentations, reports, posters and online.

You can also build your own infographics from scratch using the Everything Is Creative online tool and make your own use of the artwork you see here.

CBI’s latest survey reveals an increasing demand for a skilled workforce

CBI2016The latest CBI survey on education and skills (July 2016) revealed that businesses are predicting a rise in the demand for high-skilled jobs.  There are also growing concerns by employers of a skills shortage amongst the UK workforce the face of a rapidly changing labour market.  In response employers are showing an increasing commitment to supporting the improvement of training and education with 4 out of 5 business now involved in school/college partnerships. Some of the key findings also highlight the importance of improving career education and work-based learning experiences for young people, then main propose and intention of the new Career Education and Work Placements Standards now available for all practitioners in Scotland.

For more information access the CBI/Pearson Education and Skills Survey 2016 here

‘Closing the gap’ between education and employment, by Anthony Mann

Edu and Skills blogThis latest blog from Anthony Mann focuses on the European dimension of the link between education and employability.  It identifies employer engagement in education as a key issues in tackling the skills gap.

Government priority objectives across European countries include:

  • Tackling skills shortage/skills mismatch
  • Improving youth skills relevant to dynamic labour market demand
  • Harnessing community resources to improve attainment
  • Putting coherent pathways in place for young people moving through educational and training provision
  • Addressing inequalities in outcomes, promoting social mobility and challenging gender stereotyping.

For more information on this include OECD reports see visit the Education & Skills Today blog.

Also relevant in this context is Mann’s report key_issues_in_employer_engagement_in_education_anthony_mann‘ which specifically relates to the Scottish context. .

Learning Families – Intergenerational Approaches to Literacy Teaching and Learning

“All of the programmes featured in this publication by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning  share valuable experiences and lessons. They reflect a view of effective learning families whereby each child is a member of a family, and within a learning family every member is a lifelong learner. Among disadvantaged families and communities in particular, a family literacy and learning approach is more likely to break the intergenerational cycle of low education and literacy skills..” (Elfert and Hanermann 2014)

http://uil.unesco.org/fileadmin/keydocuments/Literacy/en/learning-families.pdf

https://familylearningscot.wordpress.com/

Family Learning Research

This report presents findings from a study of family literacy programmes in England carried out by the National Research and Development Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy (NRDC) at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) between July 2013 and May 2015. This mixed-methods study was funded by the Nuffield Foundation and explored: 1) the impact of school-based family literacy programmes on young children’s progress in reading and writing; and 2) how parents translate and implement what they learn in these classes into the home literacy environment. This study provides evidence that after attending family literacy sessions children improve their literacy skills and there are positive changes in the home literacy environment.

http://www.nrdc.org.uk/?p=838

https://familylearningscot.wordpress.com/