Category Archives: Professional Learning

Online Learning opportunities

Education Scotland CLD officers have collated a range of websites and specific online courses that may be relevant to those working in the Community Learning and Development sector. We hope you find these useful – please get in touch with Susan.Epsworth@educationscotland.gov.scot if you know of an opportunity worth sharing

Learn 100% online with world-class universities and industry experts – Browse Future Learn’s free online courses in subjects ranging from Psychology and Mental Health to Creative Arts and Media https://www.futurelearn.com/courses

Black Lives Matter – Explore resources from petitions to books and courses – to help you get involved in the Black Lives Matter movement, and educated about the history of black oppression https://www.futurelearn.com/info/blog/black-lives-matter-resources

Abertay University has four free credit-bearing courses to help individuals develop their digital marketing abilities, and support businesses. They are delivered online and include live teaching sessions. https://www.abertay.ac.uk/courses/digital-marketing-micro-courses

Professional Development Resources for College Staff  on CDN LearnOnline https://professionallearning.collegedevelopmentnetwork.ac.uk/

Free online learning in a range of subjects from the Open University    https://www.open.edu/openlearn/free-courses

Find training, tutorials, templates, quick starts, and cheat sheets for Microsoft 365, including Excel, Outlook, Word, SharePoint, Teams, OneDrive, OneNote and more https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/training

The Microsoft Certified Educator Program is a professional development program that bridges the gap between technology skills and innovative teaching, learn more: https://education.microsoft.com/en-us

Trend Micro https://internetsafety.trendmicro.com/webinars

Digi Learn Scot – a range of pre-recorded webinars to learn online at a time that suits you https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzFsp7PF70TMlqVM4nCsxSg?view_as=subscriber

 

DYW – Quick Start Guide

The following information outlines the core essentials around DYW, in order to provide a quick overview and introduction to support  planning and implementation.  It includes the following sections:

AWhat is DYW? – Introduction

B.  What are the key priorities? – DYW essential

C.  Key Resources


A.  What is Developing the Young Workforce?

  • Developing the Young Workforce is a seven year programme to reduce youth unemployment by 40% by 2021.
  • The national milestones are set out in Scotland’s Youth Employment Strategy.   
  • The programme is built on the CfE entitlements for children and young people set out in 2008 in Building the Curriculum 3.
  • DYW is a key education policy, as highlighted by John Swinney at consecutive SLF addresses : “Our education policy is enshrined by three major policies, Getting it Right for Every Child, Curriculum for Excellence and Developing Scotland’s Young Workforce.” (SLF 2017)
  • A focus on STEM sits at the heart of DYW. The Digital Learning and Teaching Strategy, Making Maths Count report and  STEM Strategy for Scotland  will contribute useful and relevant insights.
  • DYW has a particular and significant contribution to make in realising the Scottish Attainment Challenge outcomes, in particular priority 4: Improvement in employability skills and sustained, positive school-leaver destinations for all young people.

B.  DYW Essentials:   What are the key DYW priorities ?

  1. The Career Education Standard (CES 3-18):     Read the Career Education Scotland (3-18).  This document contains the key entitlements and expectations around DYW in education and provides guidance for planning and progression.

Reflective question:

  • To what extent am I familiar with the entitlements and expectations outlined within the CES 3-18?
  • To what extent do I use the CES 3-18 to plan relevant and coherent learning experiences?

2. Education -Employer Partnerships:    Establishments need to continue to develop sustainable partnerships with employers, businesses and colleges, which will enable the delivery of meaningful work-related and work-based learning opportunities.

Reflective question:

  • What type of education-employer partnerships do I currently have in place?
  • How do I ensure that these partnerships are effective and sustainable?
  • To what extent do the partnerships contribute to the curriculum design and delivery?

3. Curriculum design:   Embed DYW consistently across all that is planned for children and young people throughout education, ie. within the curriculum,  through interdisciplinary Learning, Personal Learning and Achievement and  the life and ethos of the school as a community.  For more information see Scotland’s Curriculum Refresh Narrative.   Resources for teachers and practitioners can be access on My World of Work.

In secondary schools learner pathways should be planned to reflect the needs and aspirations of young people and offer a diverse range of tailored learning programmes from BGE into the senior phase.  This should draw on a wide range of work-related courses such as Foundation Apprenticeships, Skills for Work modules, HNCs etc delivered in collaboration with colleges, training provides and employers alongside traditional subject choices.

Reflective question

  • How effectively do you plan for career education opportunities and progression pathways for learners in your school?
  • In what ways does the curriculum provision and timetabling in your establishment incorporate career education for all learners?

4.  Connect learning with the world of work:  Whenever relevant learning should be linked to careers, the labour market, employability both theoretically as well as practically.    Education establishments should therefore create work-related learning opportunities for all learners from early years to senior phase.  This may include career insight, work  inspiration, enterprise, simulated  work environments connections.   Work-based learning should be provide to all learners aqs and when required, particularly however in the senior phase.  The implementation of the Work Placement Standard should be an integral element of this.

Reflective question:

  • To what extent do I plan and incorporate work-related learning opportunities across the curriculum
  • To what extent are partners involved in delivering meaningful, work-related experiences for learners,  the delivery of skills and qualifications and highlighting prospective career opportunities?
  • To what extent do all learners our have access to relevant work-based learning experiences and palcements.

5. Improvement Planning:  DYW should be included within the establishment improvement plan and the targets should be realistic and manageable and able to be overtaken in one school year. External partners, such as employers, community learning and development and colleges, and parents should be part of the improvement planning process.  However the voice of young people  should be clear in the establishment improvement plan.   All DYW activity and targets should be clearly focussed on outcomes for learners.

Reflective question:

  • What impact are improvement measures having on learning, success, achievement, confidence, positive destinations and so on?

6. Skills:   There should be a clearer focus on enabling children and young people to recognise and track their own skills development and achievements across their learning.

Reflective Questions:

  •  How effective are profiling processes across the school/establishment?
  • To what extent do I provide opportunities to engage in profiling that supports learning and the development of skills for work and future career choices?
  • How well do I engage children and young people in meaningful discussion about their achievement within and outwith school, the development of their skills and assist them in profiling these to support their career journeys?

7.  Equalities and Inclusion:   Planning for DYW should address issues of equity, equality and inclusion. This includes: addressing parity of esteem across all types of learning and future destinations; challenging gender stereotyping; and meeting the specific needs of young people with additional support needs, from black and minority ethnic communities and those with experience of living in care.

Reflective question:

  • To what extent is our DYW offer inclusive of all learners and challenges stereotypes and bias with regard to gender, race/ethnicity, disability and learners with additional support needs ?

C.  Resources :

Next steps

  • Sign up for Education Scotland’s DYW e-newsletter
  • Find DYW news and information on the Education Scotland Learning Blog
  • Follow us on Twitter, https://twitter.com/ESskills @ESSkills

DYW – Professional Dialogue: Virtual engagement sessions

In order to support your development work and thinking around DYW  we would like to provide you with the opportunity for professional dialogue with colleagues over the coming months.  We have therefore  set up the following 3 virtual workshop sessions (interactive webinars) for you:

1,   DYW – Virtual Drop in session –  4 May (11.00 – 12.30)

This session will allow teachers and practitioners involved in the delivery of DYW to link up with colleagues and share their current development work, discuss challenges and questions and explore ideas.  You will hear from Scottish Government, SDS, the DYW Regional Groups and Education Scotland what is currently trending and planned for the immediate and longer term around DYW in education.   Register for the event here:   Eventbrite Drop In

To access this session directly without registering you have the following options:

  1. Through  SKYPE FOR BUSINESS: Simply copy and paste in the email address  1384010.skype@vscene.net  into SKYPE (‘Find’ box);
  2.  Use the web browser:  https://app.vscene.net/r/ojAGlcg8pW ;
  3. Download the Vscene App and simple enter the Vscene room number 1384010, your name and click ‘Guest Login’.                          Please note: we will be using Padlet to share information and documents during the session:  https://padlet.com/dywedscot2020/Bookmarks

2.  DYW – Online Focus session 1:   27 May (11.00 – 12.30)

This session will enable teachers and practitioners to explore key DYW themes collectively.  The workshops will introduce main aspects around selected themes and allow for professional dialogue and enquiry. This will be practical and interactive in nature and include exemplification.  Materials used on the day will be shared with registered practitioners in advance.

Please indicated in the application form  topics you would be most interested in discussion on the day:

  1. Introduction to the Career Education Standard 3-18
  2. Work placements and work-related learning
  3. Embedding skills across learning
  4. Developing effective DYW  School  Partnerships
  5. Data driven dialogue: A process guide to reviewing school/education data
  6. Curriculum design:  Providing diverse learning pathways
  7. Equalities and Inclusion in the context of DYW
  8. Other:  (please specify)

Register for the event here: Eventbrite FS1

3.  DYW – Online Focus session 2:   16 June (10.00 – 11.30) 

The programme of the event follows the structure outlined above.

Register for the event here:  Eventbrite FS 2

 

All registered participants for the above 3sessions will be sent access information closer to the date of the events.

 

Briefing on Gaelic Education

Seo fiosrachadh ùr bhuainn:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/BriefingonGaelicEducationSept2019.pdf 

Please see our September  Briefing on Gaelic Education here:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/BriefingonGaelicEducationSept2019.pdf

Our briefings on Gaelic Education  keep practitioners updated of some of Education Scotland’s, and key partners’, support for improvement in Gaelic Education. Please follow this link for more information:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/learning-resources/Briefings%20on%20Gaelic%20Education/Fiosrachadh%20mun%20Ghàidhlig

National Digital Learning Week 2019

National Digital Learning Week is back! This year the event will take place Monday 13 until Friday 17 May.

For this year’s even all Early Learning and Childcare Centres and Schools across Scotland are invited to take part in 5 Curriculum focused challenges in: STEM, Social Studies, Expressive Arts, Numeracy and Literacy.

Here’ a 2 minute video that tells you everything you need to know about the event.

Visit the Glow Blog today and get started. https://bit.ly/2PfR0Go

Inclusion team training January to April 2019

Restorative Approaches

21st and 22nd March 2019 Glasgow – Optima Building, Glasgow
Many people may believe that children and young people must be punished when they misbehave. This type of response can be ineffective, dangerous, breed resentment and make situations worse as a child or young person can be resentful of punishment rather than reflective of their actions. Children and young people require the opportunity to hear about and face up to the harm and distress they have caused others.
Restorative approaches are built on values which separate the person from the behaviour. They promote accountability and seek to repair any harm caused in a situation.
What are restorative approaches?
Schools may use restorative approaches as part of a planned response to relationship and/or discipline difficulties. This is a more effective response than traditional punishments. Restorative approaches can change the emotional atmosphere in a school and lead to more positive relationships between pupils and between pupils and staff.
These two day national training events are open to all staff and managers working in schools who have an interest in improving the ethos and culture in their school or setting.
Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come basis. Previous feedback includes “one of the most valuable training experiences I have ever been on”.

Solution Oriented Approaches
9th and 10th May 2019- Victoria Quay, Edinburgh
Solution oriented approaches aim to build individual capacity for effective problem solving and reflective practice and can be used effectively to support key meetings and discussions within schools. This is a strengths-based approach which, while acknowledging problems, focuses on future possibilities and solutions.
Solution oriented approaches have been used by practitioners in schools for a number of years with regard to supporting day-to-day practice and have also supported whole school strategic change. More recently, solution oriented practice has been used effectively to actively support positive relationships and culture change in the classroom.
This two day training aims to increase understanding and awareness of the approach and develop participant skills in working with individuals and groups, as well as developing the skills to run solution-oriented meetings.
Book a place

If you are interested in booking a place please email the following address putting the name and date of the relevant course in the subject heading of the e-mail.

EDSIE@EducationScotland.gsi.gov.uk

 

Consultation on Gaelic sector

The General Teaching Council for Scotland (GTC Scotland) is conducting a consultation to seek views on how to increase impact in the Gaelic sector. The consultation has a specific focus on the recruitment and retention of teachers of Gaidhlig, Gaelic (Learners) and those who teach a subject through the medium of Gaelic. GTC Scotland are also seeking views on improving teacher education for the Gaelic sector.

This consultation is a result of a seminar chaired by John Swinney, Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills. At this seminar, GTC Scotland and the Scottish Funding Council were asked to identify ways in which the recruitment, retention and training of teachers for the Gaelic sector could be improved. Four other Gaelic networks were charged with looking at digital learning and the senior phase curriculum, the economy and labour market, community connections, and encouraging greater confidence in the use of the Gaelic language.

Please send your responses to the consultation to gtcs.org.uk

For more information on the consultation, please visit <http://www.gtcs.org.uk/News/teaching-scotland/76-gaelic-education-your-ideas-wanted.aspx>

This link also has a useful summary of some of the developments already happening, which may act as a stimulus for the consultation.

Also to note is the consultation on the Memorandum on Entry Requirements for Initial Teacher Education Programmes in Scotland (the Memorandum).

For more information, please visit <http://www.gtcs.org.uk/News/news/literature-review-teacher-education-entry-requirements.aspx>

The consultation closes on 21 December 2018.

 

Foundation Apprenticeships: Preparing Young People for the World of Work

Foundation Apprenticeships offer young people valuable work-based learning opportunities to develop their skills and employer connections  in order to build their future career pathways.

Learners will now have the option to select a Foundation Apprenticeship as one of their senior phase subject choices and complete the qualification over one or two years in collaboration with local learning provider, such as a college and with an employer.

Skills Development Scotland has developed the Foundation Apprenticeship programme, in partnership with education and industry, which now feature  on the senior phase curriculum in most secondary schools in Scotland.  Young people can select a Foundation Apprenticeship as one of their subject choices and complete the qualification over one or two years, usually starting in S5 or S6 . This provides them  with a real, practical work placement which will give their career a head start and looks great on their CV.
A Foundation Apprenticeship is a chance to try a career out  to decide if it’s right for them.  Whatever young people want to do after school – straight into work, onto a Modern or Graduate Apprenticeship or to college or university – a Foundation Apprenticeship can open up their options.

Watch this clip to find out more about FAs:  youtube.com/scottishapprenticeship

Foundation Apprenticeships are designed by employers to ensure the qualification and skills young people develop throughout are what are needed for the world of work. Employers therefore help shape the next generation of talent and build the skills they require for their future career pathways .   At the same time Foundation Apprenticeships allow employers to spot talented, motivated learners who could become their future employees.

For more information on Foundation Apprenticeships visit  apprenticeships.scot/foundation or follow  @apprentice_scot .

FA PowerPoint presentation: FA Presentation

Download an overview of the key aspects of FAs here:  foundation-apprenticeships-positioning-doc-august-2018

Scottish Borders – Teacher Industry Insight Placements

Scottish Borders Council provided 55 teachers with the opportunity to find out first hand the skills required in  local  industries.

Sarah Rowson- Teacher of Modern languages from Berwickshire High School shares her experiences

Before the end of the summer term 2018 I spent two days with Rabbie’s Trail Burners as part of my Teacher Industry Insight Placement organised by Developing the Young Workforce Borders .

I spent one day in the Edinburgh headquarters being introduced to employees across the various departments and hearing about their roles in the organisation.  This was highly informative and helped me understand the structure and functions within the company.

The second day I spent on a day tour of the “West Highlands, Lochs and Castles” to give me a taste of Rabbie’s business from a customer’s viewpoint.

Since then, I have built on this link with Elaine Brannan, Head of HR, who is going well beyond the call of duty for my pupils.  I am running the SQA Languages for Life and Work Award this session, which includes an Employability unit.  Elaine has been in to Berwickshire High School to meet my pupils and has committed to coming back on several occasions to help them identify their transferable skills, create CVs and work on their interview skills.  She has also offered work experience to a small number.  Taking part in all these activities – and especially being interviewed and given constructive feedback – will be enormously beneficial for my pupils.  Elaine’s first visit last week was met with enormous enthusiasm, the most I have seen from this group for anything work-related!

My background is business-related (before I became a teacher) and both my experience and that of all the business contacts we have forged are really bringing home to the pupils the importance of identifying the transferable skills that they already have and developing them still further.  In this class our focus is not really the academic, but rather developing these young people in preparation to join the workforce in due course.  The placement I had with Rabbies has been invaluable here.