Category Archives: #leadership

Leadership Award for Gaelic Education: 2 and 3 November 2018, 30 November and 1 December 2018

We are delighted to announce that the Leadership Award for educators of Gaelic Medium Education (GME) organised by Social Enterprise Academy, in collaboration with Education Scotland and Bòrd na Gàidhlig, is being offered in November and December 2018. This is a professional learning opportunity which is tailored to build leadership capacity in GME. It is delivered through the medium of Gaelic. The Leadership Award is endorsed by the Scottish College of Educational Leadership (SCEL), with accreditation by the Institute of Leadership and Management Award at SCQF level 9.

The objectives of the Leadership Award are to:

  • Understand and reflect on your leadership in context of the challenges you face
  • Gain clarity on setting direction for your work and communicating change
  • Develop your skills in engaging with partnership working
  • Gain confidence in your abilities as a leader to progress your career
  • Gain insight into the skills required to be a successful leader in the Gaelic sector.

Bòrd na Gàidhlig fund this professional learning.

If you wish to apply for this Leadership Award, or require more information, please contact lorna@socialenterprise.academy

 

An t-Alltan Conference for practitioners of GME and GLE, 26 and 27 September 2018

An t-Alltan is an annual conference to support the delivery of Gaelic Medium and Learner Education in the curriculum.  It also supports the delivery of Gaelic (Learners) as part of the 1+2 Approach to Languages.

For more information, please visit

https://www.storlann.co.uk/an-t-alltan/

Useful links from our National Improvement Hub

Resources from a conference to support the GME secondary curriculum – Transitions to secondary:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/self-evaluation/Conference%20on%20Gaelic%20Education:%20Transitions%20to%20Secondary

Resources from a conference to support Gaelic (Learners) 1+2 in the curriculum:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/learning-resources/Conference%20-%20Gaelic%20Learners%20in%201plus2%20Approach%20to%20Languages

Updates from Education Scotland on Gaelic (Learners):

https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/eslb/category/languages/gaelic-learners/

Updates from Education Scotland on Gaelic Medium Education:

https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/glowblogs/eslb/category/languages/literacy-and-gaidhlig/

 

Leadership Award for Gaelic Medium Education (GME): 1 and 2 December 2017

Leadership is key to the success of schools to which all colleagues can contribute.

This  leadership programme aims to develop  practitioners as teacher leaders who are able to positively influence Gaelic Education within their school.  It has been developed by Social Enterprise Academy, in partnership with Education Scotland, and accredited by the Scottish College of Educational Leadership(SCEL).

Specific objectives are to:

  • apply leadership principles to the contemporary issues and challenges in Gaelic Education
  • use action learning and peer learning approaches to identify new approaches to improving  practice
  • enable educational professionals to develop reflective practice techniques to ensure their ongoing development as classroom practitioners
  • develop practitioners’ own leadership ability.

Practitioners can gain an Award in Leadership (SCQF 9) on attending the leadership programme and successfully completing a reflective assessment.  The programme, and related assessment, is delivered through the medium of Gaelic.

For more information, please contact Jessica@socialenterprise.academy.

 

Gaelic Medium Education – self-improvement, attainment and leadership

By Joan Esson, HM Inspector and Lead Officer for inspection of Gaelic Medium Education

The recently published report, ‘Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education 2012-2016’ (QuISE) highlighted a number of key areas of strengths and aspects for improvement from 3-18 Gaelic Medium Education (GME) inspections. You can read the chapter relating to GME on our website.

It was a great privilege to review our inspection findings for GME and evidence how the sector is developing. The approaches that are used in GME are a very effective example of language learning in Scotland.  Children learn the language to a high level of fluency which enables them to access learning through Gaelic, while achieving expected attainment levels in all areas of the curriculum.

Overall, inspectors found that most children and young people in GME were making good progress in developing their fluency. By the senior phase, attainment in Gàidhlig as a subject is strong.  Interest in the role of Gaelic (Learners) as an additional language, and the development of GME in some areas of Scotland, is growing.

In this blog, I would like to consider three areas that should be given initial consideration in using the QuISE report as part of the improvement journey for GME.

  1. Being a self-improving GME provision

Education Scotland aims to support practitioners as they build capacity for improvement. The QuISE report presents an important source for practitioners’ use in self-evaluation. The chapters for early learning and childcare, primary and secondary, should be used along with the one on GME. Education Scotland’s Advice on Gaelic Education gives a strategic guide to what constitutes high-quality national practice, some of which now forms statutory Guidance. Taken together with self-evaluation frameworks, practitioners have a rich resource to enable an in-depth focus on Gaelic. Senior leaders, along with other practitioners, should take time to use these resources for self-evaluation. In future inspections, we would like to evidence improved leadership of GME, with Gaelic being at the heart of strategic planning and part of continuous improvement.      

2. Closing the attainment gap

An important outcome of GME is that children attain equally well, or better, than their peers in English medium education. This gives parents confidence in GME for which we need to have a relentless focus on high-quality attainment and progress. In our forthcoming inspections, we would like to see practitioners, and indeed the children and young people themselves, being clearer on their progress and how to improve further. To clarify expectations, teachers assisted us in designing Benchmarks for literacy and Gàidhlig. These need to be used in the joint planning of learning, teaching and assessment;  for monitoring and tracking of progress and in the moderation of standards.

At all times, practitioners have an important role in interacting skilfully with children, while modelling good immersion techniques to help children acquire the language. Practitioners’ skill in doing this impacts on children’s fluency. Playroom experiences are threaded together and given direction with a curriculum framework that promotes continuity and progression.

Education Scotland’s Advice on Gaelic Education (particularly chapter 7), coupled with Building the Ambition, (particularly chapters 6 and 7), present practitioners with effective pedagogy for early learning in GME. Building the Curriculum 2 details children’s natural disposition “to wonder, to be curious, to pose questions, to experiment, to suggest, to invent and to explain”. In the immersion playroom, practitioners will engage in short periods of activities that they will lead as part of children’s intended learning. At other times, children will be choosing what they play which they may initiate as they follow their interests, or be an experience planned by practitioners.

If we are to close the attainment gap in GME, we need to recognise the early gains from a strong total immersion experience as part of early learning and childcare. For this, children need to hear and absorb very fluent Gaelic across a range of play contexts.   Practitioners’ quality and frequent interactions are key drivers in helping children to acquire fluency as they foster learning which is creative, investigative and exploratory.

3. Improving the leadership of the GME curriculum

The QuISE  report highlighted that our strong primary GME provisions are clear on the correlation between immersion, fluency and impact on attainment.   At the secondary stages, there is still more to do to ensure young people have enough opportunities to learn through Gaelic. We recognise in the QuISE  report that there are challenges from shortages of Gaelic-speaking practitioners.  However, we ask for more of a solution-focused approach.  Our Advice on Gaelic Education  (particularly chapters 9-13) gives strategic direction to the development of the GME secondary curriculum.

In our forthcoming inspections, we would like to see much more prominence given to those learning in GME as a group for whom pathways need to be developed. It would be useful to continue to develop a shared understanding of how Curriculum for Excellence, with its emphasis on the totality of learning, may be maximised for GME. Speakers of Gaelic are a key driver in planning the curriculum. Could more of our Gaelic-speaking practitioners in schools be delivering some aspect of the curriculum in Gaelic?  Could they, for example, be encouraged to deliver a subject, club, universal support or an opportunity for achievement through Gaelic?  The African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child” chimes with the need to increase the role of partners in the GME curriculum.  A good starting point would be for curriculum planners to know who their Gaelic-speaking partners are, and begin to ascertain how they can assist with planning and delivery of learning.

Finally, I would like to invite you to a seminar at the Scottish Learning Festival which focuses on how technology can increase learning through the medium of Gaelic. e-Sgoil presents a digital solution to delivering the curriculum. The headteacher of e-Sgoil will share an evaluation of some pilots that ran this year. Information on how to register for this seminar, and the festival programme, are available here.

Quality and Improvement in GME

We have now published the individual chapters form the Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education report on our website, along with the full report. This report gives a review of our inspection findings for the period 2012-2016. It highlights areas of growing strength and key areas for further improvement.

 

For the first time, we have included a chapter on Gaelic Medium Education (GME) which exemplifies the growth of the sector. This chapter is available at:

 

PDF file: Gaelic Medium Education (126 KB)

 

The full report may be accessed at:

PDF file: Quality and improvement in Scottish education 2012-2016 (1.1 MB)

 

We would encourage those with responsibility for Gaelic Learner and Medium Education across sectors to engage with the report. In particular,  the findings for Gaelic and to build these into improvement planning.  Addressing these areas for improvement effectively will make a decisive contribution to achieving the twin aims of excellence and equity for Scottish learners which sits at the heart of the National Improvement Framework. For more information to support improvement, please use our Advice on Gaelic Education.

 

To keep up to date with Gaelic at Education Scotland, please visit our learning blog for Gaelic Medium Education and Gaelic Learner Education.   We also publish Briefings on Gaelic Education for which partners’ contributions are invited.

Professional Learning for Teachers of Gaelic Medium Education (GME)

Streap, is a Postgraduate Teaching Certificate for teachers of 3-18 GME. It presents an opportunity to deepen your understanding of GME, while developing further fluency in the language. The next programme begins on 4 September 2017. This programme is fully-funded by the Scottish Government. For more information, please visit:
http://www.abdn.ac.uk/education/degrees-programmes/gaelic-medium-education-pgcert-436.php
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gd/cursaichean/streap

Ceannardas ann am FMG/ Leadership in GME

 

1. Social Enterprise Academy is delivering an Institute of Leadership and Management Award for teachers of Gaelic Education on 3 and 4 November 2017.  If you require more information, please contact kate@socialenterprise.academy. Social Enterprise Academy acknowledges support from Education Scotland in delivering this award and financial assistance from Bòrd na Gàidhlig.

2. The Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) is inviting views on professional learning for leadership.  Practitioners of GME are encouraged to participate by completing a short survey. As a thank you, respondents will be entered into a draw to win a book voucher worth £100 for their school.  Education Scotland has shared with SCEL the results of the CLPL Audit of the professional learning needs of practitioners in Gaelic Education.

3. Applications are now open for the Into Headship qualification which commences in June 2017.  This qualification is fully funded by the Scottish Government.  It is designed to prepare participants for the specific strategic challenges of being a head teacher.

 

 

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scel

The Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) is undertaking a survey of the profession to help better understand which forms of professional learning are most effective, what aspects of professional learning the profession aspire to participate in, and any barriers there may be when undertaking professional learning.

The survey should take around fifteen minutes to complete and as a thank you, respondents will be entered into a draw to win a book voucher worth £100 for their school.  The closing date for responses is the 6th March 2017.

Find out more about the survey here

Click here to take the survey