Category Archives: Scots

#singalangtaethelangestsang

Calling all learners, young and old! Help create the langest Scots sang EVER!

Listen to the classic Scots children’s song, The World Must Be Coming To An End, and write a new verse with your class or friends.

It’s short, it’s sweet and it’ll take you 5 minutes!

More details on the Langest Sang blog (links below)!

We’re talking about on Glow Yammer, so login below with your Glow email address if you dinna see the blether richt awa!


Language Show Live 2017

Venue: SECC, Glasgow

10-11 March 2017

For more information, please visit: http://www.languageshowlive.co.uk/scotland/

The Language Show Live invites you to Scotland’s largest dedicated event for languages. The Show gives teachers and professionals an opportunity to attend professional learning seminars, enjoy taster sessions in a range of languages and peruse learning and teaching resources.

Please visit the website for more information and to book your free ticket:

http://www.languageshowlive.co.uk/scotland/

St Andrew’s Celebrations Sing-along

small-st-andrews-singalongGlow TV is excited to be celebrating St Andrew’s Day with a series of events starting with this singalong session with Maeve MacKinnon.

Maeve will be singing a great Scots song called Bear in the Woods, by the Singing Kettle and a Gaelic song entitled Orra Bhonna Bhonnagan. The words for both songs will be available on screen for everyone to join in in their classrooms!

Join us on Friday 25th November at 11am. Sign up and join us live in Glow TV – St Andrew’s Celebrations Sing-along.

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

St Andrews Celebrations – Scots Storytelling in Shetlandic

small-scots-storytellingJoin us on Tuesday 29th November at 2pm as part of our St Andrew’s Day celebrations for an opportunity to hear Edinburgh’s Makar read from two translated books.

Christine De Luca currently holds the post of Edinburgh’s Makar (poet laureate). She grew up in Walls, Shetland, but has long been resident in Edinburgh. She writes in both English and Shetlandic, her native tongue. She has published six collections of poetry and one novel, and has been the recipient of many awards and prizes for her work. She is one of the founders of Hansel Co-operative Press which was established to promote literary and artistic work in Shetland and Orkney. In 2008 She has translated Roald Dahl’s novel George’s Marvellous Medicine into Shetlandic as Dodie’s Phenomenal Pheesic.

Join us live in Glow TV to her Christina reading ‘The Gruffalo’s Bairn’ and ‘Da Trow’.
Sign up and register to take part live – St Andrew’s Celebrations – Scots Storytelling.

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Scots Sing-along with Jeana Leslie

small-jeana-leslieJoin Jeana Leslie on Friday 28th October at 10am for this interactive event to learn two songs from around Scotland. You will be able to sing -along with Jeana (words will be on the screen) and ask her questions.

We’re all looking forward to singing with you!

Sign up and join us live – Scots Sing-along with Jeana Leslie

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Scottish Youth Poetry Slam

small-poetry-slamJoin us live from The Beacon in Inverclyde on Thursday 27th October at 1pm for the final of the Scottish Youth Poetry Slam 2016.

A Poetry Slam is an event in which 12 or more poets perform their work and are judged by a panel and audience reaction through heats. Over the past 2 months there have been regional Scottish Youth Poetry Slams where young people, selected by their peers, worked together in a workshop to compete in a Regional Slam. Winners of the Regional Slams went forward to compete in the Scottish Youth Poetry Slam.

The Slam final is an exciting, live event that is hosted with a guest band and three judges who score the performed poems. Scoring is based on audience reaction, the participant’s performance and the poem’s content. Judges will be selected from our partner organisations.

Join us at the live final to watch The Slam and find out who the final winners will be.

Sign up and join us live – Scottish Youth Poetry Slam

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Scots in Shawlands

By Adam Black

wp_20160607_12_05_28_pro

“We at Shawlands decided that it would be nice for our Primary Two classes to learn a little about Scots language. On discussing this with the children they seemed very upbeat and interested. We decided to start off our learning process by teaching some classic Scottish songs (Skyscraper Wean/Cannae Shove yer Grannie Aff a Bus etc) and by reading ‘The Gruffalo’ in Scots. This worked well and the children were hooked!

We decided to create Scots language dictionaries where the children copy down a Scots word and write what they think it means before writing down the true translation. This created lots of hilarity in the class.

We then thought it would be good to seek a talk form a professional. The children love receiving visitors and when I contacted the Education Scotland Scots language team they were prompt and pleasant in their reply. We very quickly set up a date for Bruce Eunson to come in and speak to the children. Bruce had a lovely manner with the children and they were captivated from start to finish. They really enjoyed his use of Scots and the game he played with the red balls was one they adored (I also liked it and will steal it for my own literacy work!).

Bruce also introduced us to the NLS Oor Wullie Scots website. This is a fantastic resource which we wouldn’t have found ourselves. It has interesting activities which are easy to use. It has also captured the children’s imagination as several children have come into school with Oor Wullie annuals.

Overall we are delighted that we chose to look at Scots. The children are really benefiting from learning a little about their cultural history and are enjoying throwing the occasional Scots word into lessons. They loved meeting Bruce and practising with Oor Wullie. A enjoyable experience for all and one we will use with our classes for years to come!”

wp_20160607_12_06_29_pro

Dinnae be a fairdiegowk, give the Into Film newsletter a wee read.

Well hello there!

Are you sitting comfortably? Then I’ll begin.

Do you know what a fairdiegowk is? Or a craiture? 

Fairdiegowk is now my new favourite Scots word. Sorry Bahookie, you’ve been skelped by a superior word.

My love for this new word is thanks to the amazing Gruffalo’s Child event that was held on 9th March at Dundee Contemporary Arts. This event, created and presented In partnership with Education Scotland, saw nearly 200 young people immersed in the world that is The Gruffalo in Scots.

First off the children watched the original version of the film and although it is written in English, it was great to hear the dulcet Scottish tones of Robbie Cultrane as the Gruffalo and the incredible soft Scottish lilt of Shirley Henderson as the Gruffalo’s child. (In quite a departure from her Happy Valley role!)

After watching the film the young people were treated to not one, but TWO readings from Matthew Fitt. The children really loved these readings, the first in Scots and the second in Dundonian. The Dundonian version had  been written by Matthew and had never before been heard by an audience. It was a real world first. The children thought it was “affy braw” to hear about the dietary likes of the “muckle mad moose”, which includes Gruffalo cake and Gruffalo bridies from Greggs.

After the readings the Children went through some of the differences in Language with Education Scotland and were then able to use this knowledge of Scots Language and use it to write a review of the film.

It was a brilliant day, enjoyed by adults and children alike.

Well that was our week, we have other things happening as well, but none as “teckle” as this.

Well not this week.

Next week, however, is another matter entirely.

I hope you have enjoyed this week’s story from Into Film in Scotland.

Please keep reading if you would like to know how to use film as part of National Careers Week and to hear more about the new film Hail, Caesar!

Best wishes,

Jo

Jo Spence is part of the Education Team at Into Film Scotland

Find out more here: Into Film Newsletter

GIFTING EVERY CHILD TRADITIONAL ARTS RESOURCE

Whit sangs, tales an dauncin culd we gie ilka bairn in Scotlan fir a richt guid handsel? Tae stert oot wi as a smidgin, a wee seed whilk micht graw intae muckle trees o pleisur an wunner. Here’s a wee mindin tae begin wi fir aabody, reidy tae yaise an free tae aa.

Dè na h-òrain, sgeulachdan, dannsaichean, agus cleachdaidhean tradaiseanta nan ràithean, air am bu chòir do gach leanabh no pàiste ann an Alba a bhith eòlach? Dè tha buntainn leotha as bith cò às a tha iad, no dè an cultar no an cànan a th’ aca?

What songs, stories, dance steps and seasonal customs should every child in Scotland know? What belongs to them regardless of origin, culture or language? Presented in a simple online format incorporating text, audio, video and helpful guidelines, Gifting Every Child provides a manageable and accessible introduction to the traditional arts that can easily be put to use in the classroom, club, community hall or family sitting room.

In providing educators, parents, teachers and anyone else who wishes to engage in creative work with children with an accessible selection of some of the best examples of the traditional arts, we in turn gift the children with an introduction to Scotland’s creative culture and indigenous languages, which could serve them a lifetime of benefit.

Incorporating a multimedia format of text, audio files (both streamable and downloadable) and video, the resource is easily downloadable and ideally designed to suit various abilities and levels of interest – whether you want to meticulously engage with each piece of the resource, or pick and choose from what is available. Guest editors Bea Ferguson (story), Christina Stewart (song) and Mats Melin (dance) have years of experience in their respective fields, and especially in engaging with children and education. The inclusion of Gaelic and Scots throughout is vitally important, with the material provided also being broadly targeted at the 6 to 9 age group.

In the second stage of this project, TRACS plans to develop the Gifting Every Child model across communities through a series of workshops, and by promoting local practitioners able to support creative work with children. The public are warmly invited to add their own local or family favourites to the collection, thus making this a collaborative project in which everyone living in Scotland can tap into our rich creative culture.

View or download the resources for free at: Gifting Every Child

View the Promo Video

For further information please contact:

Morag Wells | Digital & Languages Apprentice | TRACS morag@scottishstorytellingcentre.com | 0131 556 9579

GiftingEveryChildLogo

Oor Hoose Project Sharing Day

What a super day I had on Friday 19th February, when Duff House, the property owned by Historic Environmental Scotland in Banff, Aberdeenshire, truly became Oor Hoose.

This was the culmination of an Education Scotland partnership project with Historic Environment Scotland and Aberdeenshire Council. Learners in Dr Fairbairn’s Scots Language Award class from Banff Academy took over Duff House for the afternoon. They hosted a sharing event for invited guests to see the work they have been doing in Scots language, particularly for the Oor Hoose project.  

It has involved learners from Banff Academy Scots Language Award class choosing and researching an object from Duff House and then preparing a response to it involving Scots, specifically the local dialect, Doric. It was designed to encourage learners to engage with the House and use Scots for a purpose. Last year’s pilot saw the production of mosaics in conjunction with a local artist. This year, products include quizzes, presentations and signs.

I was fair chuffed tae see as mony lairners enjoyin an engagin wi Scots throue iss project. The bairns wis a credit tae themsels, their fowk and the skweel.

We were piped into the impressive building by one of Banff Academy’s pipe band members, fresh from wowing delegates at the Aberdeen Learning Festival earlier in the week.

The afternoon began with a few words from Sylvie Clarke of Historic Environment Scotland, who has supported the project throughout. We then heard from Buildings Manager Mr G Curran about how the project had caught the imaginations of staff at the property – even resulting in some dispute about whose Doric is purer – fowk fae Banff or fowk fae Buckie! Dr Faribarin then gave a summary of the kind of work his bairns have been doing.

It was then time for the learners  to introduce themselves and their work, before inviting us to tour the house, solving puzzles and answering quiz questions in Scots. They helped by standing next to their chosen objects and engaging knowledgably with visitors who had questions. Everybody had a super time, with some parents and friends admitting that this was the first time they had been inside the house in many years, if ever. All were impressed by the knowledge, confidence and Scots skills displayed by the group.

We rounded off a super afternoon with refreshments: local tattie crisps, Scottish chocolate treats and our national soft drink – ale in this area, juice to some and ginger to others. And a treat for those who had stayed until the very end (most of the adults who were not troubled by having school buses to catch) – some folk music from our resident piper Robert Legge and Dr Fairbairn on guitar.

Duff Hoose really felt like Oor Hoose that afternoon. And the great news for the future  is that HES interpretations team is going to adopt the materials produced by the bairns: there will be Doric for visitors to the property for years to come.

For more information about Duff Hoose visit their website.

If you would be interested in taking part in an Oor Hoose project in your local area, contact Diane.Anderson@edcuationscotland.gsi.gov.uk

Duff Hoose group