Category Archives: CLD

Adult Learning Strategy sub group update

 Following the first meeting of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland (ALSFS), in September, the Adult Learning Strategy Sub-Group set about getting 5 consultative workshops and an adult learning survey underway. 

By late-October, the learning survey was up and running (https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/AdultLearningSurvey2019/).  This will remain live until at least the end of November, so please encourage and support your learners to participate.

The Strategy Sub-Group would like to thank the partners and colleagues who participated in the recent strategic themed workshops.  These were organised around the themes of:

The Adult Learning Offer and Planning Progression

Advice and Guidance

Access, Empowerment and Change

Learning for Work

Workforce Development

 The rich discussion led to outputs and actions which the Sub-Group are now reviewing.  These will be reported to ALSFS when it next meets in December. Although still early in its conception, work around the new Adult Learning Strategy has already gathered momentum and it’s hoped that colleagues and partners are already enjoying a sense of involvement and ownership of the strategy, which is expected in late 2020. 

If you haven’t had the chance to input into the strategy yet, further consultation is planned over the coming months for local services, practitioners and learners – dates and locations to follow.  We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Focus on Adult Learning in CLD

This month marks 100 years of Adult Learning. Across our communication channels we have been busy highlighting the campaign and the work that Community Learning and Development (CLD) covers in adult learning.

The thing that surprises most people about CLD is the variety of roles and diversity of learning that is covered. People who work in CLD often have a variety of disciplines to cover and ensure they are equipped with the necessary skills and knowledge to provide these. The CLD Standards Council is the professional body for people who work or volunteer in CLD.

Adult literacy & Numeracy in Scotland follows a social practice model. It looks at the skills, knowledge and understanding that a learner has to build on and relates learning to a context within personal, family, working or community life. Provision is offered in a learner centred way and can use real life resources such as bills, letters, newspapers or other household resources to support learning to have a real life context.

ESOL is English for Speakers of other languages and community based ESOL is delivered by CLD teams across Scotland. Scotland has supported the Syrian Resettlement Scheme in recent years which also links to ESOL provision and wider CLD activity in communities although this can look different in different local authorities. ESOL learners can come from any country in the world and groups can be made up of a variety of languages and cultures.

Community based adult learning in Community Learning and Development (CLD) can cover a wide variety of learning opportunities that are intended to be informal, relaxed, friendly opportunities that aim to break down barriers for learners who are hardest to reach. These can be adults with multiple barriers such as mental health, physical health, learning difficulties, alcohol and drug addictions, long term unemployment and social isolation among others.

Adult learning in CLD covers a variety of areas such as confidence building, health issues, bereavement, life changes (such as divorce or redundancy) focussing on areas of high deprivation where poverty impacts on households and families.

CLD is a value-based practice and CLD professionals have committed themselves to the values of self-determination, inclusion, empowerment, working collaboratively and the promotion of adult learning as a lifelong activity. Programmes and activities are developed in dialogue with communities and participants, working particularly with those excluded from participation in the decisions and processes that shape their lives.

The focus of CLD in all areas of adult learning are improved life chances for people of all ages, through learning, personal development and active citizenship with stronger, more resilient, supportive, influential and inclusive communities.

The Education Scotland CLD Team works to support the CLD sector in delivering high quality learning opportunities relevant to the communities that are in need. The Education Scotland CLD Team supports professional learning across different areas of adult learning in CLD and supports the creation of new policies and strategies. The team is keen to share and promote interesting practice that is of interest delivered by CLD workers who work tirelessly to improve the communities and individuals they work with. Get in touch if there is a piece of work you would like us to share! Contact Laura.McIntosh@educationscotland.gov.scot for more information.

Towards Best Practice in Educating Separated Children

Scottish Refugee Council, Glasgow Clyde College, Aberlour and Stirling University ran a conference on Wednesday 25 September, the culmination of a year-long project, Towards Best Practice in Educating Separated Children. The aims of the conference were to:

  • To present new research by Stirling University into the educational and language needs of unaccompanied asylum-seeking, refugee and trafficked young people (16-18)
  • To present the views of young people themselves on their education and aspirations; and
  • To promote the Glasgow Clyde College ‘16+ ESOL’ model – rationale, and curriculum and teaching resources.

The 16+ESOL Routes to Learning handbook sets out the approach, curriculum and teaching resources of Glasgow Clyde College’s 16+ESOL programme for separated children (16-18). It is a helpful resource for lecturers and teachers educating separated children in Scotland, the UK and elsewhere, in colleges and schools or in the community as well as other professionals, such as social workers and guardians. Whilst developed for separated children, the resources may be used and adapted in other ESOL, EAL and other language learning settings. A link to further online resources can also be found in the handbook.

The full research report and executive summary can be found here  Towards Best Practice in Educating Separated Children

The live stream footage from the conference in Glasgow on educating separated children is on Youtube (64 mins). It features researchers from Stirling University presenting their findings into Glasgow Clyde College’s 16+ESOL programme, as well as a presentation from two of the lecturers behind the programme.

A film of four young people (9 mins) who have benefited and graduated from the 16+ESOL programme was shown at the conference.

The project was funded by the Glasgow Clyde Education Foundation and Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

An exemplar of the 16+ ESOL programme at Glasgow Clyde College can also be found on the National Improvement Hub.

Update from the Adult Learning Strategy working group

Following on from our last update, posted after the highly successful Adult Learning Conference at Newbattle Abbey College,  the Adult Learning Strategy working group, a subgroup of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland, has met on several occasions. There have also been meetings with the new chair of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland: Mhairi Harrington, to discuss progress with the strategy’s development. As you might expect, the final document is still a number of months away so a great deal of work is still needed before a first draft of the strategy is available for consultation. At this stage however the group is pleased to report that the outline of a strategy, based on all the prior consultation and feedback from the sector, is beginning to emerge.

The working group are clear that any new strategy should be aligned to the National Performance Framework so the key deliverables within the strategy will contribute to one or more policy objectives. A draft vision and mission has now been developed and some broad areas of focus and key delivery themes are gradually being formed. All of these developments and proposals from the working group were discussed at a full meeting of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland on 20th August and an update to the wider sector will follow about the continued shaping of the strategy.

The strategy working group has also been looking to find ways and means to engage directly with learners and ensure that any strategy fundamentally meets learner needs. A survey questionnaire is now in the final stages of development. This will be tested in the next few weeks with several small focus groups before wider circulation later in the year.  This will also provide a snapshot picture of adult learning in Scotland so please help us by sharing the survey so that this data is as robust and representative as possible.

The outcomes from the meeting of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland on 20th August and the feedback from the learner questionnaire will shape the efforts of the working group over the next few months. A number of sector stakeholder events will be planned around the proposed themes and areas of focus. These will be led by members of the working group and will give everyone further opportunities to comment on and contribute to the next stages of the strategy’s development.

The working group will continue to update the sector regularly and hope that you and your learners will join us to share your views in the months ahead, as the strategy develops.  All opportunities for engagement will be promoted widely through the usual channels.

For more information contact Nicola.Mcandrew@gov.scot

Adult Learning Strategic Forum Scotland (ALSFS) update

Community Learning and Development Policy transferred from Education Scotland to the Scottish Government in September 2018. Prior to this transfer, the Strategic Forum for Adult Learning, supported by Scottish Government and Education Scotland had been tasked to “develop a national framework for adult learning that outlines the key priorities in delivering adult learning in Scotland”. As a result, the forum developed the Adult Learning Statement of Ambition.

 The Scottish Government is committed to supporting and developing adult learning.  With this in mind, the new CLD Policy Team has worked with the adult learning sector to refresh this forum to create the Adult Learning Strategic Forum Scotland [ALSFS]. The forum’s revised membership and terms of reference were approved in April 2019. The ALSFS is anticipated to operate until 2023.

 The ALSFS will provide strategic advice to the Scottish Government in support of adult learning policy and in particular on matters of direction, performance and planning. Their current focus is to build on the Statement of Ambition and develop a new Adult Learning Strategy for Scotland to be launched sometime in the spring of 2020.  At the Adult Learning Conference at Newbattle Abbey College on 22nd May, the Minister for Further Education Higher Education and Science: Richard Lochhead, announced that the ALSFS would be chaired by the former principal of West Lothian College Mhairi Harrington.

 The ALSFS will continue to consult across the adult learning sector and more widely with other areas of the education and skills system and significant organisations in the public private and third sectors. The Adult Learning Conference in May provided an opportunity for both discussion groups and workshops on the priorities for adult learning and what should this new adult learning strategy aim to deliver for the people of Scotland. The Minister made it clear in his speech that this strategy must be about more than ambition and characterised by delivery and action

 While consultation is and will be essential, the ALSFS has recognised the sense of urgency in the development of the strategy and that clear direction and focus is also needed. To that end it has tasked several members of the ALSFS to form a working group to take the strategy forward. The members of the working group are:-

 Ray McCowan – Workers Educational Association                       

Jackie Howie – Learning Link Scotland

Emma Whitelock – LEAD Scotland

James King – Scottish Prison Service

Jane Logue – CLD Managers Scotland

Wendy Burton – Scottish Union Learning

Sandra Grieve – Newbattle Abbey College

Bonnie Slade – University of Glasgow

Nicola McAndrew – Scottish Government

Elisha Fisher – Scottish Government

Lindsay MacDonald – Education Scotland

 The group met the day after the Adult Learning Conference and have agreed to meet once a month until the strategy is delivered in the Spring of 2020. Work has begun on a survey aimed at ensuring that learners are fully involved in the consultation process and will have a significant say in the strategy’s development. At the same time they are building on the large amount of work already undertaken to develop the key themes of the strategy.  They are considering how they can promote an intensive week of consultation across the country in the early autumn to get some focus on the development of the strategy. The aim is to deliver the first draft of the strategy and to circulate this out for extended consultation by late autumn 2019.

 The intention is to keep stakeholders across the sector fully informed on how the work of the ALSFS is progressing. This will be achieved through regular updates to the sector following on from each monthly meeting of the ALSFS.

 

Regional Working and the CLD Team

Education Scotland has now moved to a regional delivery model and will support improvement and capacity building at local, regional and national level. CLD members are now part of Regional Teams. Each Regional team is headed up by a Senior Regional Advisor. There are six teams based on the geographies of the six Regional Collaboratives. The work of ES staff is not just limited to the RICs. All Regional teams except the Northern Team have a CLD presence. Team members will be in touch to make contact and find out about local developments.

Tayside Regional Improvement Team (Dundee, Perth and Kinross and Angus) Senior Regional Advisor (acting) –

CLD presence – Susan Epsworth, Development Officer, CLD Susan.Epsworth@educationscotland.gov.scot

South East Regional Improvement Team (Edinburgh City, Fife, Midlothian, East Lothian, Scottish Borders) Senior Regional Advisor – Alistair Brown

CLD presence – Chris Woodness, Education Officer, CLD (secondment) Vince Moore, Development Officer, CLD Vincent.Moore@educationscotland.gov.scot

South West Regional Improvement Team (Dumfries and Galloway, East Ayshire, South Ayrshire and North Ayshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Carol Copstick

CLD presence – Nicola Sykes, Senior Education Officer

Dehra Macdonald, Development Officer, CLD Dehra.Macdonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Forth Valley and West Lothian Regional Improvement Team (Falkirk, Stirling, Clackmannanshire and West Lothian) Senior Regional Advisor – Jackie Halawi

CLD presence – Lindsay MacDonald, Education Officer, CLD Lindsay.MacDonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Mandy Watts, Development Officer, CLD Mandy.Watts@educationscotland.gov.scot

West Regional Improvement Team (Glasgow City, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Patricia Watson

CLD presence – John Galt, Education Officer, CLD mailto:John.Galt@educationscotland.gov.scot

Laura Mcintosh, Development Officer, CLD Laura.Mcintosh@educationscotland.gov.scot

Northern Regional Improvement Team (Aberdeen City, Aberdeenshire, Moray, Argyll and Bute, Shetland Islands, Western Isles, Highland, Orkney) Senior Regional Advisor – David Gregory

The UK’s second ever National Numeracy Day is fast approaching…

As you may be aware, nearly half of working-age adults in the UK currently have numeracy levels that we expect of primary school children. Low numeracy skills have a significant negative impact on individuals, their families and society overall and it is estimated that low numeracy skills cost the UK economy £20.2bn a year.

That’s why we are asking you to join us for National Numeracy Day and help increase numeracy levels in Scotland.

Following last year’s highly successful campaign in Scotland, Education Scotland and the Scottish Government are participating in National Numeracy Day on 15th May 2019 as lead supporters.  The day will be an annual celebration of the importance of numbers in everyday life and aims to involve individuals, employers, educators and supporters from across the UK to help improve numeracy levels.

Get involved! 

We would like to offer all organisations in Scotland the opportunity to get involved as a champion of the day. Being a champion means you have access to toolkits to engage and support individuals to improve their numeracy. This will involve encouraging individuals to check whether they have theEssentials of Numeracy’ using National Numeracy’s free online tool and using the resources online to improve their numbers skills.

In return for promoting this campaign and getting individuals to use the online resources, champions will be able to use the National Numeracy day champion logo on all marketing and social media outputs and will receive official recognition of their role as a Champion on the National Numeracy Day website (logo will appear on the site).  Through use of an organisation specific URL we will also be able to give more detailed data back to champions on the number of people from their organisation who completed the challenge and overall average numeracy levels.   

If you would like to get involved, or have any questions, please get in touch. 

Lindsay MacDonald, Education Officer Lindsay.macdonald@educationscotland.gov.uk

 

 

Explorathon is coming!

Explorathon is a set of interactive ‘Meet the Researcher’ events happening all over Scotland on Friday 28th and Saturday 29th September. It’s part of a Europe-wide programme called European Researchers’ Night, there’s a particular emphasis on European funded research but any researchers can take part.
Check out the link below to see what is happening near you!
http://www.explorathon.co.uk/

Review of Learning at Home (2018)

This review provides clarity and the first Scottish national definition of learning at home which is vital to help practitioners take this agenda forward. Research shows that learning at home can have significant immediate and longer term impacts on children in different ways. These include a child’s early learning, later achievements, nurture, resilience, wellbeing, social mobility and skills for life.

Supporting parents to help them with their child’s learning at home is therefore ‘a vital part of improving outcomes for children, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds’ (Hunt et al, 2011).

 

CLD MS Conference 31st October 2018

The annual Community Learning and Development Conference will take place on Wednesday 31 October 2018, from 10.00am to 4.30pm in the West Park Conference Centre, 319 Perth Road, Dundee, DD2 1NN.

The conference theme is

Community Learning and Development’s role in addressing the Poverty Related Attainment Gap

The conference will be of interest to staff and managers involved in all sectors of community learning and development, including Local Authority Services, Further Education, Community Planning, Voluntary and Third Sector Organisations

An ‘early bird’ delegate rate of £65 is available for bookings made before the 30 September 2018. Bookings received after this date will be charged £85.  Refreshments on arrival and lunch are included in the price.

Click on link to register

https://www.youthlinkscotland.org/events/october-2018/community-learning-and-development-conference/book-now/