All posts by Susan Epsworth

Online Learning opportunities

Education Scotland CLD officers have collated a range of websites and specific online courses that may be relevant to those working in the Community Learning and Development sector. We hope you find these useful – please get in touch with Susan.Epsworth@educationscotland.gov.scot if you know of an opportunity worth sharing

Learn 100% online with world-class universities and industry experts – Browse Future Learn’s free online courses in subjects ranging from Psychology and Mental Health to Creative Arts and Media https://www.futurelearn.com/courses

Black Lives Matter – Explore resources from petitions to books and courses – to help you get involved in the Black Lives Matter movement, and educated about the history of black oppression https://www.futurelearn.com/info/blog/black-lives-matter-resources

Abertay University has four free credit-bearing courses to help individuals develop their digital marketing abilities, and support businesses. They are delivered online and include live teaching sessions. https://www.abertay.ac.uk/courses/digital-marketing-micro-courses

Professional Development Resources for College Staff  on CDN LearnOnline https://professionallearning.collegedevelopmentnetwork.ac.uk/

Free online learning in a range of subjects from the Open University    https://www.open.edu/openlearn/free-courses

Find training, tutorials, templates, quick starts, and cheat sheets for Microsoft 365, including Excel, Outlook, Word, SharePoint, Teams, OneDrive, OneNote and more https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/training

The Microsoft Certified Educator Program is a professional development program that bridges the gap between technology skills and innovative teaching, learn more: https://education.microsoft.com/en-us

Trend Micro https://internetsafety.trendmicro.com/webinars

Digi Learn Scot – a range of pre-recorded webinars to learn online at a time that suits you https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzFsp7PF70TMlqVM4nCsxSg?view_as=subscriber

 

Big CLD Blether

John Galt, CLD Education Officer reflects on the Big CLD Blether

I’ve been absolutely blown away by the amazing response of the community learning and development (CLD) sector to the Covid-19 crisis. While the lockdown obviously led to the abrupt suspension of most face to face CLD activities, from the start we’ve been hearing examples of how community workers, youth workers, adult educators and family learning workers in both the public and third sectors have continued to support learners and communities with dedication, creativity and kindness. Across Scotland, CLD practitioners have been supporting community initiatives to deliver food, medicine or provide vital social contact to vulnerable families and isolated people; engaging with young people through imaginative digital youth work; adapting learning activities to be accessible online, by phone or through resources to use at home; and helping to extend the reach of school and community hubs for children of key workers and vulnerable families. Many CLD providers are now playing a key role in helping to develop local and national recovery plans.

So I was delighted to help to facilitate The Big CLD Blether  – a virtual discussion with over 90 CLD practitioners and managers across Scotland which was jointly hosted by Education Scotland and The CLD Standards Council for Scotland on 28th May. The session was one of a series held throughout May to support practitioners from across the education system. (#ESBigBlether)

One of the challenges in our diverse sector is finding common digital platforms to use. We went for Google Meet for The Big CLD Blether which seemed to work well for most people.

The discussions were based around four themes and participants chose which ones to take part in. We were lucky to have 3 or 4 experienced practitioners in each themed discussion who shared their experiences and addressed questions from other participants. There were a lot of issues raised in each of the four discussions. Notes from the session will be available on iDevelop but here are some of the points raised:

Theme one: Operational challenges for CLD providers

Participants recognised the good work being done to support the changing needs of learners and communities. CLD organisations are also dealing with significant challenges though. Many 3rd sector organisations are facing extreme financial pressures and some staff had been furloughed. In some areas, local authority CLD staff had been redeployed. Many have been realigning what they do to engage learners and communities remotely while trying to address the clear digital inequalities that exist in our communities. The move to digital is a steep learning curve for many and so effective professional learning for staff is key. There is a strong recognition of the need to support the health and wellbeing of learners and staff.

Theme two: Engagement and learning – what’s working well?

Examples of what is working well were threaded through each of the discussion groups.  We heard about the wide range of digital platforms being used by CLD providers to engage young people, adult learners and community groups. We heard lots of examples of practitioners being flexible and endeavouring to start where learners are at online and we were reminded of the Digitally Agile CLD principles and the great resources out there, such as those on digital youth work from YouthLink. There were frustrations at the limitations that some organisations placed on using some platforms, although there was a recognition of the increased importance of digital safety. We heard that Youth Awards like Hi-5 and Saltire are being widely used to recognise young people’s volunteering during the crisis and that as lockdown eases, there is an increasing focus on supporting young people through street work.

 Theme 3: Supporting the health and wellbeing of CLD participants and staff

CLD practitioners can help participants to address the impacts of staying at home and feelings of grief, worry, stress or loneliness. We heard some of the feedback from the Lockdown Lowdown study which led to discussions on how can we best support the mental wellbeing of young people now and as lockdown continues to ease. Meanwhile feedback from the CLD Standards Council practitioner survey highlighted that many workers were dealing with stress themselves. Effective CPD and peer support are increasingly important priorities for practitioners.

Theme 4: Looking forward – the role of CLD in the recovery phase.

CLD practitioners have important roles to play – in education recovery plans and in wider community renewal. There are many opportunities for CLD to contribute including outdoor learning, blended learning with schools, supporting parents and families, youth awards etc. broad range of services, showcase ourselves. CLD workers will also have key roles to support community groups and organisations to rebuild and help to rebuild partnership working and collaboration to ensure that resources are deployed to best effect. Much of the focus for recovery planning will be at the local level and it is important that CLD partners are involved. There will also be an increasing need for CLD to support wider regional and national collaboration to support ‘building back better’ efforts. Participants were keen to maintain some of the new processes that have been put in place during lockdown.

Feedback about The Big CLD Blether was positive. Participants told us that they enjoyed re-connecting with CLD colleagues and discussing experiences and  pieces of work going well.

Both Education Scotland and the CLD Standards Council are keen to keep the discussions going with further CLD ‘blethers’ so please watch this space!

 

 

Upcoming webinars and online opportunities for CLD

The Education Scotland team have collated a number of webinars and online opportunities hosted by ourselves and others that may be of relevance to CLD practitioners and managers. See details of dates, times, platform where available and link for signing up below.

Monday 6th July: 2 – 3.30pm, YouthLink Scotland: Climate Emergency Training for Youth Workers, https://bit.ly/3fybOEX

Monday 6th July: 2 – 3.30pm, Third Sector Lab: Working Better: Keeping in touch with your team, https://bit.ly/37S8Mc8

Tuesday 7th July: 7 – 8pm, Our Bright Future/National Youth Agency: UK Youth for Nature seminar, https://bit.ly/2VRpIul

Wednesday 8th July: 10 – 12pm, Youth Scotland: Arts Training, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2Zk06Ht

Wednesday 8th July: 11 – 12pm, LEAD Scotland Supporting Others to be Safe Online, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2XHTjrj

Wednesday 8th July: 11 – 12.30pm, Third Sector Lab: Digital Strategy, https://bit.ly/2BwNunX

Monday 13th July: 2 – 3.30pm, Third Sector Lab: Simple smartphone video, https://bit.ly/37SrJuV

Tuesday 14th July: 2 – 3.30pm, SCVO: Accessibility and UX (user experience), Zoom, https://bit.ly/2Y65tL9

Wednesday 15th July: 11am, Community Development Alliance Scotland: Members and Subscribers conversation, https://bit.ly/2Ncevj7

Wednesday 15th July: 12 – 12.45pm, YouthLInk Scotland/Fin Wycherley: Instagram for Youth Work, https://bit.ly/2YM3wDV

Wednesday 15h July: 2 – 3.30pm, YouthLink Scotland: Climate Emergency Training for Youth Workers, https://bit.ly/3fybOEX

Wednesday 15th July: 2 – 3.30pm, Third Sector Lab: Data Visualisation: Exploring Tableau, https://bit.ly/2AXIvgm

Thursday 16th July: 12 – 12.45pm, YouthLink Scotland/Police Scotland: Helping young people stay safe online, https://bit.ly/2Am06yk

Thursday 16th July: 4 – 5pm, LEAD Scotland: Supporting Others to be Safe Online, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2XHTjrj

Friday 17th July: 10 – 12pm, Youth Scotland: Arts Training, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2ZfQMnY

Friday 17th July: 1 – 2pm, CLD Standards Council: Virtual Catch Up for members, TBC

Monday 20th July: 11 – 12.30pm, Youth Scotland: Online Games Training, Zoom, https://bit.ly/3ivwuQa

Monday 20th July: 2 – 3.30pm, Third Sector Lab: How to support your team when working remotely, https://bit.ly/315BtAE

Friday 24th July: 10 – 11.30am, YouthLink Scotland: Climate Emergency Training for Youth Workers, https://bit.ly/3fybOEX

Monday 27th July: 1 – 2pm, LEAD Scotland: Supporting Others to be Safe Online, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2XHTjrj

Monday 27th July: 2 – 3.30pm, YouthLink Scotland: Climate Emergency Training for Youth Workers, https://bit.ly/3fybOEX

Monday 27th July: 2 – 3.30pm, Third Sector Lab: Simple animation, https://bit.ly/3euJnru

Monday 27th July: 2 – 3pm, Youth Scotland: Laughter Yoga Awareness session, Zoom, https://bit.ly/3f5cykT

Tuesday 28th July: 10 – 12pm, Youth Scotland: Arts Training, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2VrqSN6

Wednesday 29th July: 2 – 3.30pm, Third sector Lab: Data Visualisation: Exploring Microsoft Excel, https://bit.ly/3fL7FgT

Thursday 30th July: 12 – 12.45pm, YouthLink Scotland/Police Scotland: Keep yourself safe online, https://bit.ly/2ZyZzBq

Friday 31st July: 2 – 3pm, Youth Scotland: Laughter Yoga Awareness session, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2Ccnu1S

Monday 3rd August: 2 – 3pm, Youth Scotland: Laughter Yoga Awareness session, Zoom, https://bit.ly/3e9ES4E

Tuesday 4th August: 10 – 1pm, YouthLink Scotland: What on earth is digital youth work? Zoom, https://bit.ly/3iCbt6j

Wednesday 5th August: 10 – 11am, LEAD Scotland: Supporting others to be safe online, Zoom, https://bit.ly/3gvYTUi

Thursday 6th August: 12 – 12.45pm, YouthLink Scotland/Police Scotland: Safe choices for your apps and platforms, Zoom, https://bit.ly/31RMYMz

Friday 7th August: 2 – 3pm, Youth Scotland: Laughter Yoga Awareness session, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2VMuKbl

Monday 10th August: 2 – 3pm, Youth Scotland: Laughter Yoga Awareness session, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2C74phl

Tuesday 11th August: 12 – 12.45pm, YouthLink Scotland/CHAS: Take active listening online, https://bit.ly/2D4SjFV

Friday 14th August: 2 – 3pm, Youth Scotland: Laughter Yoga Awareness session, Zoom, https://bit.ly/3gp7OXE

Friday 14th August: 2 – 3pm, LEAD Scotland: Supporting others to be safe online, Zoom, https://bit.ly/2BGPOtc

Tuesday 25th August: 10 – 1pm, YouthLink Scotland: What on earth is digital youth work? Zoom, https://bit.ly/3gxVCno

Thursday 10th September: 9.30am – 2pm, CORRA Foundation: CYPFEIF & ALEC Online conference; Building Resilience, https://bit.ly/3gkn3kJ

Also check out https://bit.ly/3fN7Fgi and https://bit.ly/2V4g5Iw for a range of pre-recorded webinars from the Education Scotland Digital Skills team. These were created for formal education setting, but the content will be a just as relevant to CLD practitioners. For example, learn how to use Microsoft Forms for quizzes and surveys or watch the session on online gaming and gambling.

Please contact Susan.Epsworth@educationscotland.gov.scot if you would like us to promote something on your behalf

Adult Literacies and ESOL visit

On Tuesday 3rd March and Wednesday 4th March 2020 Education Scotland welcomed colleagues from the Waterford and Wexford Education Board http://waterfordwexford.etb.ie/ in Ireland. They came to Scotland to learn about Adult Literacy and ESOL provision delivered across different providers. 

Education Scotland’s CLD, Parental Engagement and Family Learning team welcomed the visitors and heard about the delivery methods, resources and focus in Ireland. Nicola Sykes, Senior Education Officer, shared information on the regional and national commitments of Education Scotland as well as within the scrutiny directorate. Nicola also gave a background to CLD provision in Scotland, in terms of how it is set up and the role of the CLD Standards Council. 

The programme for the two days was developed with many partners across the West and Forth Valley and West Lothian regions and was a huge success! The adult literacy group visited provision in Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire as well as in Stirling. The local authorities organised for learners, volunteers and staff to be available to share information, resources and knowledge on the delivery methods used in Scotland. The group also met with City of Glasgow College who shared their Community Learning and Development programme, detailing the focus on health and mental health programmes whilst embedding SQA qualifications in delivery.

The ESOL group had a particular focus on SQA ESOL qualifications from ESOL literacies through to ESOL at the different levels available. They met with the ESOL Team at SQA who were able to discuss how the qualifications were developed, including the content, assessment and verification processes required. They also met with Glasgow ESOL Forum, a voluntary organisation who deliver ESOL with embedded SQA’s in various community settings in Glasgow along with North Lanarkshire Council who also embed qualifications into their ESOL provision. North Lanarkshire Council also had a Syrian learner giving a presentation showing his journey over the last three years from arrival, initial English assessments, learning and volunteering opportunities to him now working on an apprenticeship programme.

North Lanarkshire had various partners attend the session such as Voluntary Action in North Lanarkshire, volunteers, befrienders and CLD staff who were able to share their experiences of the partnership approach to the delivery to ensure learners learn English as well as integrate into the community, make connections and progress in their lives independently.

If you would like to hear any more about the visits please contact Laura McIntosh, CLD Development Officer, mailto:Laura.Mcintosh@educationscotland.gov.scot

 

Regional CLD Engagement Events

We’re working with the Scottish Government, local CLD partners and CLD Standards Council to host 10 Regional Engagement Events on Adult Learning and CLD policy. The morning sessions will focus on consultation on the development of the new Adult Learning Strategy and the afternoon will allow an opportunity for partners to explore the local and national context for CLD. See sign up details for each region below:

Northern Alliance (Elgin 24th February)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-elgin-tickets-91278708073

West (Glasgow 25th February)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-glasgow-tickets-91381956893

South East (Edinburgh 27th February)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-edinburgh-tickets-91351882941

Forth Valley and West Lothian (Livingston 5th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-livingston-tickets-91349461699

Tayside (Dundee 11th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-dundee-tickets-91380358111

Northern Alliance (Aberdeen 16th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-aberdeen-tickets-91350498801

South West (Dumfries 17th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-dumfries-tickets-91356221919

West (Coatbridge 18th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-coatbridge-tickets-91383948851

South East (Galashiels 24th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-galashiels-tickets-91352472705

South West (Ayr 27th March)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/adult-learning-collaborating-for-improvement-regional-events-ayr-tickets-91357575969

 

 

 

Adult Learning Strategy sub group update

 Following the first meeting of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland (ALSFS), in September, the Adult Learning Strategy Sub-Group set about getting 5 consultative workshops and an adult learning survey underway. 

By late-October, the learning survey was up and running (https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/AdultLearningSurvey2019/).  This will remain live until at least the end of November, so please encourage and support your learners to participate.

The Strategy Sub-Group would like to thank the partners and colleagues who participated in the recent strategic themed workshops.  These were organised around the themes of:

The Adult Learning Offer and Planning Progression

Advice and Guidance

Access, Empowerment and Change

Learning for Work

Workforce Development

 The rich discussion led to outputs and actions which the Sub-Group are now reviewing.  These will be reported to ALSFS when it next meets in December. Although still early in its conception, work around the new Adult Learning Strategy has already gathered momentum and it’s hoped that colleagues and partners are already enjoying a sense of involvement and ownership of the strategy, which is expected in late 2020. 

If you haven’t had the chance to input into the strategy yet, further consultation is planned over the coming months for local services, practitioners and learners – dates and locations to follow.  We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Focus on Adult Learning in CLD

This month marks 100 years of Adult Learning. Across our communication channels we have been busy highlighting the campaign and the work that Community Learning and Development (CLD) covers in adult learning.

The thing that surprises most people about CLD is the variety of roles and diversity of learning that is covered. People who work in CLD often have a variety of disciplines to cover and ensure they are equipped with the necessary skills and knowledge to provide these. The CLD Standards Council is the professional body for people who work or volunteer in CLD.

Adult literacy & Numeracy in Scotland follows a social practice model. It looks at the skills, knowledge and understanding that a learner has to build on and relates learning to a context within personal, family, working or community life. Provision is offered in a learner centred way and can use real life resources such as bills, letters, newspapers or other household resources to support learning to have a real life context.

ESOL is English for Speakers of other languages and community based ESOL is delivered by CLD teams across Scotland. Scotland has supported the Syrian Resettlement Scheme in recent years which also links to ESOL provision and wider CLD activity in communities although this can look different in different local authorities. ESOL learners can come from any country in the world and groups can be made up of a variety of languages and cultures.

Community based adult learning in Community Learning and Development (CLD) can cover a wide variety of learning opportunities that are intended to be informal, relaxed, friendly opportunities that aim to break down barriers for learners who are hardest to reach. These can be adults with multiple barriers such as mental health, physical health, learning difficulties, alcohol and drug addictions, long term unemployment and social isolation among others.

Adult learning in CLD covers a variety of areas such as confidence building, health issues, bereavement, life changes (such as divorce or redundancy) focussing on areas of high deprivation where poverty impacts on households and families.

CLD is a value-based practice and CLD professionals have committed themselves to the values of self-determination, inclusion, empowerment, working collaboratively and the promotion of adult learning as a lifelong activity. Programmes and activities are developed in dialogue with communities and participants, working particularly with those excluded from participation in the decisions and processes that shape their lives.

The focus of CLD in all areas of adult learning are improved life chances for people of all ages, through learning, personal development and active citizenship with stronger, more resilient, supportive, influential and inclusive communities.

The Education Scotland CLD Team works to support the CLD sector in delivering high quality learning opportunities relevant to the communities that are in need. The Education Scotland CLD Team supports professional learning across different areas of adult learning in CLD and supports the creation of new policies and strategies. The team is keen to share and promote interesting practice that is of interest delivered by CLD workers who work tirelessly to improve the communities and individuals they work with. Get in touch if there is a piece of work you would like us to share! Contact Laura.McIntosh@educationscotland.gov.scot for more information.

Towards Best Practice in Educating Separated Children

Scottish Refugee Council, Glasgow Clyde College, Aberlour and Stirling University ran a conference on Wednesday 25 September, the culmination of a year-long project, Towards Best Practice in Educating Separated Children. The aims of the conference were to:

  • To present new research by Stirling University into the educational and language needs of unaccompanied asylum-seeking, refugee and trafficked young people (16-18)
  • To present the views of young people themselves on their education and aspirations; and
  • To promote the Glasgow Clyde College ‘16+ ESOL’ model – rationale, and curriculum and teaching resources.

The 16+ESOL Routes to Learning handbook sets out the approach, curriculum and teaching resources of Glasgow Clyde College’s 16+ESOL programme for separated children (16-18). It is a helpful resource for lecturers and teachers educating separated children in Scotland, the UK and elsewhere, in colleges and schools or in the community as well as other professionals, such as social workers and guardians. Whilst developed for separated children, the resources may be used and adapted in other ESOL, EAL and other language learning settings. A link to further online resources can also be found in the handbook.

The full research report and executive summary can be found here  Towards Best Practice in Educating Separated Children

The live stream footage from the conference in Glasgow on educating separated children is on Youtube (64 mins). It features researchers from Stirling University presenting their findings into Glasgow Clyde College’s 16+ESOL programme, as well as a presentation from two of the lecturers behind the programme.

A film of four young people (9 mins) who have benefited and graduated from the 16+ESOL programme was shown at the conference.

The project was funded by the Glasgow Clyde Education Foundation and Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

An exemplar of the 16+ ESOL programme at Glasgow Clyde College can also be found on the National Improvement Hub.

Update from the Adult Learning Strategy working group

Following on from our last update, posted after the highly successful Adult Learning Conference at Newbattle Abbey College,  the Adult Learning Strategy working group, a subgroup of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland, has met on several occasions. There have also been meetings with the new chair of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland: Mhairi Harrington, to discuss progress with the strategy’s development. As you might expect, the final document is still a number of months away so a great deal of work is still needed before a first draft of the strategy is available for consultation. At this stage however the group is pleased to report that the outline of a strategy, based on all the prior consultation and feedback from the sector, is beginning to emerge.

The working group are clear that any new strategy should be aligned to the National Performance Framework so the key deliverables within the strategy will contribute to one or more policy objectives. A draft vision and mission has now been developed and some broad areas of focus and key delivery themes are gradually being formed. All of these developments and proposals from the working group were discussed at a full meeting of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland on 20th August and an update to the wider sector will follow about the continued shaping of the strategy.

The strategy working group has also been looking to find ways and means to engage directly with learners and ensure that any strategy fundamentally meets learner needs. A survey questionnaire is now in the final stages of development. This will be tested in the next few weeks with several small focus groups before wider circulation later in the year.  This will also provide a snapshot picture of adult learning in Scotland so please help us by sharing the survey so that this data is as robust and representative as possible.

The outcomes from the meeting of the Adult Learning Strategic Forum for Scotland on 20th August and the feedback from the learner questionnaire will shape the efforts of the working group over the next few months. A number of sector stakeholder events will be planned around the proposed themes and areas of focus. These will be led by members of the working group and will give everyone further opportunities to comment on and contribute to the next stages of the strategy’s development.

The working group will continue to update the sector regularly and hope that you and your learners will join us to share your views in the months ahead, as the strategy develops.  All opportunities for engagement will be promoted widely through the usual channels.

For more information contact Nicola.Mcandrew@gov.scot

Adult Learning Strategic Forum Scotland (ALSFS) update

Community Learning and Development Policy transferred from Education Scotland to the Scottish Government in September 2018. Prior to this transfer, the Strategic Forum for Adult Learning, supported by Scottish Government and Education Scotland had been tasked to “develop a national framework for adult learning that outlines the key priorities in delivering adult learning in Scotland”. As a result, the forum developed the Adult Learning Statement of Ambition.

 The Scottish Government is committed to supporting and developing adult learning.  With this in mind, the new CLD Policy Team has worked with the adult learning sector to refresh this forum to create the Adult Learning Strategic Forum Scotland [ALSFS]. The forum’s revised membership and terms of reference were approved in April 2019. The ALSFS is anticipated to operate until 2023.

 The ALSFS will provide strategic advice to the Scottish Government in support of adult learning policy and in particular on matters of direction, performance and planning. Their current focus is to build on the Statement of Ambition and develop a new Adult Learning Strategy for Scotland to be launched sometime in the spring of 2020.  At the Adult Learning Conference at Newbattle Abbey College on 22nd May, the Minister for Further Education Higher Education and Science: Richard Lochhead, announced that the ALSFS would be chaired by the former principal of West Lothian College Mhairi Harrington.

 The ALSFS will continue to consult across the adult learning sector and more widely with other areas of the education and skills system and significant organisations in the public private and third sectors. The Adult Learning Conference in May provided an opportunity for both discussion groups and workshops on the priorities for adult learning and what should this new adult learning strategy aim to deliver for the people of Scotland. The Minister made it clear in his speech that this strategy must be about more than ambition and characterised by delivery and action

 While consultation is and will be essential, the ALSFS has recognised the sense of urgency in the development of the strategy and that clear direction and focus is also needed. To that end it has tasked several members of the ALSFS to form a working group to take the strategy forward. The members of the working group are:-

 Ray McCowan – Workers Educational Association                       

Jackie Howie – Learning Link Scotland

Emma Whitelock – LEAD Scotland

James King – Scottish Prison Service

Jane Logue – CLD Managers Scotland

Wendy Burton – Scottish Union Learning

Sandra Grieve – Newbattle Abbey College

Bonnie Slade – University of Glasgow

Nicola McAndrew – Scottish Government

Elisha Fisher – Scottish Government

Lindsay MacDonald – Education Scotland

 The group met the day after the Adult Learning Conference and have agreed to meet once a month until the strategy is delivered in the Spring of 2020. Work has begun on a survey aimed at ensuring that learners are fully involved in the consultation process and will have a significant say in the strategy’s development. At the same time they are building on the large amount of work already undertaken to develop the key themes of the strategy.  They are considering how they can promote an intensive week of consultation across the country in the early autumn to get some focus on the development of the strategy. The aim is to deliver the first draft of the strategy and to circulate this out for extended consultation by late autumn 2019.

 The intention is to keep stakeholders across the sector fully informed on how the work of the ALSFS is progressing. This will be achieved through regular updates to the sector following on from each monthly meeting of the ALSFS.