Tag: toolkit

Consume – Spending

More and more of the money we spend is spent online or digitally. Whether that is debit card or Go Henry, mobile contactless with Google or Apple Pay, or online payments like PayPal and even cryptocurrency.
Learners need to understand the benefits and risks of using digital money and online accounts to make purchases. Do they understand the amount of targeted advertising that they are exposed to? Are they aware of when a social media ‘influencer’ is being paid to promote products to them?

The risks:

  • pressurised into purchases by targeted advertising, influencer promotions, or in-app/in-game microtransactions
  • fake or misleading listings on apps such as eBay and Amazon
  • cyber scams, such as phishing and ransomware

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • do accounts have secure passwords with THREE RANDOM WORDS or are they using 2-factor authentication (2FA)?
  • are they storing payment details on online accounts? This increases risk of overspending or impulse buying and also increases risk of having card details stolen if an account is hacked
  • learners should be aware of cyber risks, such as phishing, hacking and malware (ransomware)

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • discuss the risk of scams and cyber crime to their finances and impact on their wellbeing if they lose money
  • explore the pitfalls of overspending and how advertising and influencers work, and how to be smarter about their spending
  • explain that cyber crime and scams hurt people and that they should be kind enough not to harm others this way

Consume – Gaming

Gaming is one of the most popular past times in the world. The amount of money spent playing games is more than that spent on video-on-demand (VOD), such as Netflix, or music streaming like Spotify combined. There are many aspects to gaming beyond playing the games, including livestreaming, esports or gambling.

Modern online gaming requires an account, with profiles, direct messages (DMs) and livestreams similar to the features on social media
Learners should be aware of the risks of inappropriate content in games, the pressure to make purchases (lootboxes, FUT, skins), and the risks associated with playing multiplayer online games whether friends or strangers.

This could be explored through Literacy and English LIT x-18a – Recognise the difference between fact and opinion and progressing to evaluative comments about relevance reliability and credibility with appropriate justification

The risks:

  • pressurised into purchases by targeted advertising, influencer promotions, or in-app/in-game microtransactions
  • inappropriate content – in games or livestreams
  • receiving unwanted DMs

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • Ensure they have a secure login, such as password or 2-factor authentication
  • Have they set up account recovery details in case their account is hacked
  • Explore their gaming account profile – what is public and private? Are they aware of any risks or benefits?
  • Make them aware of any potential risks, such as clicking links in DMs that could lead to phishing or malware
  • If content is harmful or malicious in games, streams or DMs – do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Discuss the risk of playing inappropriate games or viewing streams
  • Ask them to explore and recommend smarter choices for more appropriate games – this could be class game reviews alongside book reviews
  • Look at how they can be kinder when playing cooperatively

Consume – Searching

More and more of the information we read is read online. Social media and web pages have replaced newspapers, and even TV, for many of us and our learners. 
Learners will likely use apps, such as TikTok or YouTube, to find information rather than a traditional web browser. However, web browsers and search engine apps, such as Google, will usually have more safety and security features to make searching more accurate and more accurate or reliable search results will help learners avoid ‘fake news’ or malicious/harmful content.

This could be explored through Literacy and English LIT x-18a – Recognise the difference between fact and opinion and progressing to evaluative comments about relevance reliability and credibility with appropriate justification

The risks:

  • Learners may follow in-app or social media links which may be targeted advertising or a ‘rabbit hole’ of misinformation
  • Without appropriate search settings, learners may find inappropriate or harmful content
  • Learners are probably unaware that the first results returned in a web search are usually adverts linked to shopping sites, and feel pressured into making a purchase

Becoming cyber resilient is the first step to being safer online. Talk to your learners about the devices and accounts that they use to access online information:

  • Make them aware of any potential risks, such as unreliable webpages or targeted advertising
  • Explain the advantages of using a web browser to find information over social media apps – a search engine, such as Google, will allow users to use filter settings that reduce the risk
  • If search results are harmful or malicious do they know how to report it?

Being more cyber resilient reduces the risk of internet safety issues arising. We all want the internet to be a more welcoming space for children and young people and that is why we promote this positive message of safe, smart and kind.

With your learners:

  • Make them aware of the dangers of clicking the first results returned or searching without filters, like SafeSearch, enabled
  • Teach them how to use settings, advanced search or keyword parameters to increase the relevance of search results
  • Discuss how to understand, analyse and evaluate search results. You may already be doing this with physical texts, such as books, but it is important to make the learning contextual.