Category: Numeracy and Maths

Having the skills and opportunity to work with others using digital technology, Heriot Primary, Renfrewshire

Whenever I plan a lesson, I refer to the Digital Learner poster to ensure that I am incorporating at least one of these skills in my lesson. In my primary one class, we had been learning about shapes and their properties. In order to consolidate their learning, I brought out a shape mat and told them we were going to play a game where they had to travel from one shape to another using a Robot Mouse. This instantly grabbed their attention and I initially let them play around with the mouse to see what they knew and if anyone could work out how to programme the mouse.

A few of the children immediately recognised the arrows from games consoles and their computer keyboard. They began playing with the mouse, using words like forwards and backwards. I then stepped in to show them how to ‘clear’ their instructions and asked them to input one direction, press go and then press clear after the mouse carried out the instruction. This allowed all pupils to take part in the activity at a very basic level.

At this point, some of the children started to ask if they could do a “long move” to get the mouse there quicker. This then opened a discussion about how would you remember what instructions you had put into the mouse. A 4 year old boy suggested working with a partner, where one child could input the instructions into the mouse and the other child could use their hand, place it on the mat and move it along the squares on the mat following the instructions. Working together, the pupils managed to programme the mouse to move across the mat.

This was a great activity to introduce directional language, introduce the concept of coding, as well as ensure that the pupils were confident in being able to identify different shapes. Working together as a team, the pupils were quick to point out if the instruction was correct (that’s right, not left) and would help guide each other to the correct shape, especially if they mistook a pentagon for a hexagon.

 

bebras computational thinking

Bebras Computational Thinking Challenge for Teaching Problem Solving

The Bebras Computational Thinking Challenge is a great resource to develop your learners to the pattern spotting and problem solving skills required for maths (and it also lends itself to cyber security education too!) The questions are in the form of engaging puzzles that start off relatively easy – so every student can have a go and should get something out of the competition.

Try out previous year’s challenges here.

 

Here is how Portlethen Academy engaged with the challenges.

 

The Bebras Challenge was actually the starting point for the Scottish Cyber Champions, the Greenwood Challengers – find out all about their journey here:

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Digital Learning in Maths From the MIE Scotland blog

Hugh Wallace

Teacher of Maths

Kyle Academy, South Ayrshire

Twitter @MrWM4ths

Waking a Digital School

As with all schools in Scotland, Kyle Academy closed our doors on Friday 20thMarch with very little warning, and quite literally, no time to prepare.  The final week was spent ensuring that those who were still able to attend school, had a note of their Glow login details and knew how to access Microsoft Teams.

For some staff, they had already been using Teams with a handful of classes, but for most, they hadn’t logged into Glow for a very long time!  This was going to be a challenge!

As the ‘Digital Champion’ in school, and the only MIE Expert, I knew it was time to step up and offer support to the school community.  This has been a huge task, but I feel very proud of where we are now!

 

Read more on the MIE Scotland blog

 

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Developing Conceptual Understanding of Maths through Blended Learning – Dalmilling Primary School, South Ayrshire

Scott Morrow, Principal Teacher of Numeracy from Dalmilling Primary School in South Ayrshire has created a YouTube channel to host his videos that help learners, teachers and parents to develop their
understanding of maths and numeracy concepts.
This is his channel, where you can view his tutorials:
or you can contact him by:
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Jayne Mays, Fintry Primary – Online Learning with STEM Challenges

Jayne Mays, Fintry Primary
Jayne Mays, Fintry Primary

When the prospect of a lockdown became apparent I, as an RCT teacher for the whole school, began to panic. My main concern was how will we be able to continue to develop the skills that they have spent the past 9 months working on with myself in Digital Technologies/STEM?

So when the lockdown resulted in both home and online learning, I had to think outside the box. I was aware that not all of our children would have access to a device to participate in online learning or even have the tools to complete the schemes of work we had planned on doing in the coming weeks.

 

For the home learning packs, I created STEM Challenge Grids – one for infants (P1-3) and one for upper (P4-7) classes, which you can see below. These grids encompassed previous learning since the beginning of the session, allowing the children to consolidate their learning. They were encouraged to share their progress with us via our school twitter account, or through an email (which we then shared, with permission, to our twitter feed).

 

 

I then had to start thinking of ways to continue the STEM learning as the lockdown progressed and the above grids would be getting completed.

This was when I decided to brave the camera and give the whole school STEM challenges twice a week (a Monday and a Thursday), each week would focus on a different letter of STEM for both challenges. This allowed the children to experience some old and some new learning in fun ways. The videos I make are done in one take, whether it works or not, and if it doesn’t work I will often keep persevering until I get it right so they see the process of evaluating and adapting, or if I would like them to figure it out without me giving them the answer, I will stop and challenge them to complete it better than I did!

These challenges are posted on our school twitter feed and the Microsoft Team channels for our P4-7 and ESA children.

Some of the challenges that we have had so far include:
★ Creating a ramp for an easter egg that smashes the egg at the end
★ Creating a paper ball using origami (which also doubled up as a water balloon)
★ Scavenger Hunts – maths and electronic focus
★ Designing a BeeBot and then creating a maze for it to go through, writing with 3 different levels of code ★ Chemical Reactions with Vinegar and Bicarbonate of Soda
★ Pushing pencils through a bag of water
★ Fitting through a piece of paper
★ Creating patterns
★ Growing a rainbow
★ Completing Barefoot online games
★ Completing Hour of Code games

Similar to the grids, I encourage the children to share how they got on and the feedback from the children has been great. They have been up for the challenges set, and some have even replicated the videos I’ve made (and done them so much better!). The children sometimes share videos or photographs of their challenges at different stages through email, uploading to Teams or the school twitter feed.

Through these STEM challenges, the learners and their families are exposed to different areas of STEM and are enjoying it. Which will definitely help us in the future as we drive STEM forward within our setting – so maybe rather than being apprehensive about how we would continue developing skills we had worked so hard on since August, I should have been jumping for joy as now they learners can share their STEM learning experiences first hand with their families and get them involved!

Jayne Mays

Twitter  @jaynemays__

To view the full sway including videos and grids, please click the link below.

(Glow account required)

Go to this Sway
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Digital Journals for Blended Learning

Thursday 25th June 2020 at 11am

Glow login required

The aim of the session is to demonstrate how learners could use tools, such as OneNote, Jamboard or PowerPoint to create a journal of their learning. This would be used to retain their knowledge and develop their understanding of learning and then apply this at home in more creative contexts.

Please be aware these sessions are for practitioners across Scotland who have a Glow account. Some products may not be available in your Local Authority, please check in advance.

Upon booking your ticket a link will be issued to you for you to join the Digital Skills Microsoft Team Site within Glow where the training will take place, this can take 24hours to process.

Register Now

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Digital Content – ThingLink, Google Earth and Google Tours

Wednesday 10th June 2020 at 1pm

Glow Login Required

This session is aimed at teachers, primarily in the Primary sector, but could be adapted to the wider BGE. The aim of the session is to demonstrate ideas for creating, delivering and assessing Digital Literacy using

  • Thinglink; it’s interactive image and video technology features
  • Google Earth to create stories, maps, voyages and quizzes
  • Google Tours a web-based storytelling tool which lets you easily create and explore stories and places around the world

Please be aware these sessions are for practitioners across Scotland who have a Glow account. Some products may not be available in your Local Authority, please check in advance.

Upon booking your ticket a link will be issued to you for you to join the Digital Skills Microsoft Team Site within Glow where the training will take place, this can take 24hours to process.

Register Now

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BeeBots at Home with Kirkton of Largo Primary School Fife

Gemma Sanderson, Primary Teacher from Kirkton of Largo Primary School in Fife, shares how Computing Science learning can be continued at home by creating your very own paper BeeBots!

using pencils laid out on table to create a maze
carboard cut out of bee bot
maze on floor created with necklaces
maze in sand pit created with assorted plastic toys
bee bit made with paper plate and had decorated with arrows

Further Information
Email: gw11sandersongemma@glow.sch.uk
twitter: @gems_sand @KirktonPS

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Webinar: Numeracy & Mathematics through Computing Science at BGE

Wednesday 10th June 2020 at 11am

Glow Login Required

This session is aimed at teachers, primarily in the Primary sector, but could be adapted to the wider BGE. The aim of the session is to demonstrate ideas for creating, delivering and assessing Numeracy & Mathematics through Computing Science activities, such as data handling, number systems and problem solving.

Please be aware these sessions are for practitioners across Scotland who have a Glow account. Some products may not be available in your Local Authority, please check in advance.

Upon booking your ticket a link will be issued to you for you to join the Digital Skills Microsoft Team Site within Glow where the training will take place, this can take 24hours to process.

Register Now

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Flipgrid in the Remote P1 Classroom, Riverbank School, Aberdeen City

Aberdeen City CouncilFLIPGRID IN THE REMOTE CLASSROOM

Flipgrid, a video discussion platform, is used for different purposes in the remote classroom. Among them, to mention a few that we use in P1 at Riverbank school, are the following:

● As an engagement tool. In my P1 class in Aberdeen with 17 pupils, we have started using Flipgrid in Google Classroom, in today’s literacy assignment, children were to show their favourite book and tell us why. They show up, talk about their book and express their emotions. They improve their oratory skills, the possibility of adding stickers, backgrounds and other aesthetic enhancers is also an attractive feature to them.

● As a prompt: in Registration I upload directly from Flipgrid to Google Classroom as a short video (called shorts in Flipgrid) which is used as a conversation starter and mind engaging with the learners. Next week they will be having again prompts during registration: Things that they have learnt during confinement, even and odd numbers, using the connective “but”, using the connective “and”, something I did was it a subtraction or an addition, can you represent it graphically? They watch the video and they can choose to answer with a video back or in writing.

● As an assessment tool: Another Flipgrid they had last week The instructions were to tell us about their favourite book, mention the title and the author and tell us the function of an illustrator. The two key resources which support teachers to plan learning, teaching and assessment are experiences and outcomes and benchmarks. With this Flipgrid activity, the children should be exposed to, recognise. Describe, and make use of:

○ Recognize book words: cover, author, illustrator, theme, title etc

○ Share likes and dislikes

○ Enjoy choosing stories

Finally, let me tell you that for language teachers it is a great tool as well. It allows for fantastic feedback on pronunciation. But not only that, it can be used for presentations, acting, interpersonal communication, making connections, language and cultural comparisons. It is the perfect space for the students to practise their speaking skills and share their thoughts. The teacher can set goals and reflect on progress. Moreover, the teacher can use language to develop critical thinking, investigate, explain, and reflect. Flipgrid allows for the 4 Cs of education in the 21st century to be developed and encouraged in the activities you set. It enriches the learning experience greatly.

Flipgrid has got many other uses and functions. I would be very interested in hearing your experience with this tool.

Pilar Arqued

gw18arquedpilar@glow.sch.uk
@pilararqued