Category: Assessment

Assessing Numeracy and Maths with Forms

Forms can be used to create Quizzes (which allow assessment and feedback) or Forms (which collect information, such as evaluations). They can contain text, images and videos, which makes them engaging and accessible to more learners. A Quiz can also be set with correct answers and this will automatically assess and provide feedback to learners, which is ideal for metacognition. They are easy to duplicate and share between staff which can support moderation, ensure assessment is proportional and comparable between classes or levels.

Shetland Islands Council Q&A

Education Scotland’s DigiLearn team are always happy to provide their digital expertise and support to practitioners. In October 2020 the team took part in Shetland Islands Council’s two in-service days for practitioners, which for the first time were held on-line.  The DigiLearn team provided a wide range of sessions for staff on everything from digital pedagogy skills to unleashing creativity using digital tools.  In this Q&A Jacqueline Casey, Workforce Development Advisor at the time, and James Johnston, Quality Improvement Officer, from Shetland Islands Council, and Tracy Langley, Operational Lead For Remote Teaching for Shetland and Depute e-Sgoil, discuss the sessions.

 

Why are in-service days important for your staff?

 

The October In-service days are two dedicated days per year that are focussed on professional learning for our staff, therefore ensuring a varied yet appropriate programme for them each year is vital.  Usually our programme is planned and compiled based on the wants, needs and feedback from our frontline staff and management and also any national themes and focus at the time.  The opportunity for professional learning is very important for staff development and practice, and also contributes to staff being able to positively influence the lives and experiences of the children and young people they work with in Shetland.

 

  • This was the first time Shetland’s in-service Day has been held on-line. How did you find this compared to previous years?

 

At the start of COVID-19 we had started our planning, including contacting external trainers from across Britain on the premise that they would be physically visiting us in October.  So when we went into lockdown and realised eventually that it wasn’t going to be a short term thing, a quick decision had to be made as to if and how we were going to be able to deliver the programme.  It was decided that we would push on to try to organise a fully virtual programme, thinking that it would be far smaller than our usual offering.  We also decided on four themes to try to make things a bit more focussed – Health and Wellbeing (for pupils and staff), Digital Skills, Literacy and Numeracy.  These themes were decided both based on national themes but also on a reflection of what the year had been like for our staff, and where priorities had needed to shift so rapidly in response to COVID-19.

 

The actual programme itself went really well, and the feedback we got from our follow up survey was really positive.  We were delighted that we could provide such a large and varied programme and of course that the technology all worked on the day!

 

  • What topics were you looking for Education Scotland’s DigiLearn team to cover as part of the in-service days?

 

We have worked with Education Scotland for digital input for a few years now, and in conjunction with our Digital Skills Lead here in Shetland, to contribute to and build on our Digital Strategy.  So we were really happy to be guided by the digital team for our in-service programme – particularly where we were aware that remote teaching and learning had rocketed to the front focus of how teachers and pupils were now living and working.  We wanted this theme to be about the delivery of blended teaching and learning, but also about making the best use of the technology available to our staff.  Therefore the courses that Susan and her colleagues delivered were:

  • Flipped Learning to Support Blended / Mixed Delivery Model
  • Digital Tools for Assessment & Feedback
  • Digital Pedagogy Skills
  • Using Digital Tools to Capture, Create and Share Outdoor Learning Experiences
  • Unleashing Creativity Using Digital Tools

 

  • Why did you think these topics in particular would be of interest to practitioners?

The themes of literacy, numeracy, health and wellbeing and digital are present in each year of the October In-Service programme but are usually supplemented by a broad range of other professional learning opportunities.  Central Officers, in conjunction with workforce development colleagues took the decision to narrow the focus in 2020 across these core areas in respect of the following considerations:

Manageability – in terms of the online nature of the programme and practitioners skills and knowledge to access learning from remote locations

Alignment – ensuring professional learning supported our strategic priorities with regards to recovery and renewal and reflected our local authority messaging around minimising the number of school improvement priorities

Relevance – understanding the needs of staff and learners and providing a meaningful and motivating programme to meet these needs

Capacity – giving consideration to teachers’ and practitioners’ own ability to consume and implement new learning in the context of the pandemic

Readiness – supporting staff to be confident in delivering within their school’s approach to blended and/or remote learning

The digital skills aspect of the programme stood out by itself but also supported innovation and creativity relevant to the other three areas.

  • How do you think practitioners will use the information provided in these sessions?

 

The October In-Service creates an opportunity to collectively ‘pause and upskill’ but is just one aspect of a cyclical, year round offer of high quality professional learning opportunities.  Teachers will use the learning in a number of ways depending on where they are at in their learning journey but broadly speaking the digital approach to professional learning is driving more engagement and collaboration:

 

Engagement Building on the success of approaches to remote learning in term four of 2020, sharing coursework and homework on digital platformsand engaging with pupils and parents in a more digitally agile way.  Monitoring learner engagement and participation and identifying where more support is required.

 

Collaboration – using digital platforms to collaborate at many levels.  For example, withinschools, across departments andlocal authorities as well as engagement at RIC level and participation in national conversations, regional improvement collaboratives and nationally.  The ability to share knowledge and practice with colleagues and gather insight and information from national partners has been strengthened.

 

  • Looking to the future – what digital topics do you think will be useful for your practitioners to learn about?

 

Practitioners will need time to embed new skills and ways of working and so the pace of change needs to be managed effectively.  It is important to create the right conditions to ensure that people feel confident, competent and supported in working in a digitally agile way.  We have paused the development of a digital and teaching strategy in order to understand and evaluate this period of rapid change and, given the period of significant change within the digital learning and teaching landscapesince March 2020 , revisit some of the consultation questions which were shaping the strategy prior to lockdown.  This will ensure we are moving in the right direction, investing our resources and time in the right way and building a digital education workforce where nobody is left behind.  In the meantime, for the remainder of this school year, we will take advantage of the range of professional learning opportunities to support our current position and listen to what our teachers need next.

Going forward digital skills training for the use of the Glow platform and Teams, SharePoint, PowerPoint, One Note Class Notebook and the Promethean interactive panels are to be made our standard offering. Our digital skills support package is updated throughout the year to direct all staff to these online courses which they can do at a time that suits them best. One off sessions delivered by Ian Stuart at Microsoft and the Education Scotland team can also be offered as and when needed throughout the year. These can complement each other and also allow for staff to revisit online courses andtutorials if needed.

 

Local authorities – if you would like advice or support from Education Scotland’s DigiLearn team please contact – Kirsty McFaul via email at Kirsty.McFaul@educationscotland.gov.scot

Remote Learning – What is Working? Berwickshire High School in Scottish Borders.

In this guest blog post, Derek Huffman, PT Pedagogy / English Teacher from Berwickshire High School in Scottish Borders, South East Improvement Collaborative, shares what is working well in remote learning and what they can take back to the classrooms as a whole school team when learners return.

 

One of the many issues facing teachers during ‘remote learning’ is maintaining high levels of student engagement. It is understandable why, when left to their own devices, a student might reach for their PlayStation controller rather than their school iPad. What can we do to fight this?

At Berwickshire High School, our student engagement spreadsheet suggests that, in some areas, teachers are consistently keeping students coming back for more. After discussing with staff what is working, I found that, though no two people are doing the exact same thing, there are some key commonalities. 

I’ve pulled these together, with some exemplification, in this seven-minute video:

Where it’s working, teachers are focussed on the following:

  • Simplifying: reducing the amount of ‘stuff’ students are facing to what is essential. What is simplest way to word the Learning Intentions? Do you need that extra slide?
  • Using the success criteria like a checklist
  • Having a ‘consistency of experience’ for the students: students know that at this time, they go here, where they’ll experience a lesson with a common structure – starting with daily review, going into a discussion of the Learning Intentions and Success Criteria, followed by teacher modelling and time to complete a task, and ending with a plenary where the teacher checks that the students have learned what they should have.
  • Giving brief, regular, useful bits of feedback that outline next steps

None of this is rocket science, but it works. The good news is that these are all the exact same things we should be doing in our actual classrooms. If we can focus on getting this right during these wild times, just think how much more effective we’ll be as teachers when we bring what we’ve learned back into our classrooms!

The majority of teachers I know are being too hard on themselves at the moment. It’s important to remember that we are doing our best, and if you are struggling, call someone. Send an email. We’re all in the same boat and if we row in the same direction, we’ll get there.

Derek Huffman , PT Pedagogy, Berwickshire High School

gw09huffmanderek@glow.sch.uk

 

 

Digital Quality Assurance of National Qualifications

This post outlines one possible digital solution for a quality assurance process when reviewing leaner evidence.

Using Microsoft Teams and OneNote, learner evidence can be curated and shared with peers. Discussion around learner evidence can be done asynchronously or live, with the results of the discussion recorded in text, video or voice notes.  Every member of the team will be able to access the record of quality assurance to enable them to make judgements about their own learners.

An interactive summary of this suggested process can be downloaded here.

Quality Assuring Senior Phase Learner Evidence

Step 1- Identify Staff Groups

Identify a group of teachers who will work together to quality assure evidence.  Example groupings might be

  • trios of subject departments from across a local authority or regional improvement collaborative
  • a group of single teacher department from across a local authority.

It is likely to be more manageable to limit the number of staff per group.

If possible, when creating groups of staff, distribute staff/departments who are experienced with SQA marking appropriately.

Step 2 – Set up a PLC Team in Microsoft Teams.

One person from each group sets up a team and creates a OneNote notebook to host the quality assurance evidence.  A template page can be created to ensure consistency of recording evidence.  The template text used in the video can be downloaded below.

This short video outlines the process of creating a PLC Team and a structure for the Notebook. At this stage, it would be beneficial if the person creating the team and notebook had access to the OneNote desktop app in order to add Section Groups.

Download the NQ template text

A note about the welcome page – you may wish to add some instructions, links to SQA understanding standards documentation for your subject, or embed the adding learner content (below) videos on the welcome page.

Useful SQA links include

Understanding Standards www.understandingstandards.org.uk

NQ21 pages  to keep up to date  https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/95157.html

Step 3 – Invite/share the team code with the group of teachers

At this point, learner evidence can be uploaded.  This can be done by individual teachers. However, it may be that a nominated person from each department uploads content onto individual pages.

In the first instance, you may want to focus on just one area / topic / unit.  For example, Folio from Higher English.

How to add learner content to page

You may be in the position where you have multiple paper based pieces of evidence for a learner.  For example and exam script. If you have a mobile device, you can use the OneDrive and OneNote apps to combine multiple photos of that into a single PDF and insert it into a OneNote page.

Step 4 – Carrying out Quality Assurance activities

Once the notebook is populated with learner evidence and each page is named appropriately, staff can then carry out QA activities.  This can be done during live meetings of the group where breakout rooms could be utilised and each breakout room is allocated a set number of pages to discuss. Alternatively, the group can agree who will quality assure what pages by a set date and this can be done individually.

Some examples can be downloaded below

Download Example Use Cases

In recent webinars, these use cases were summarised and presented as a set of slides.  You can get these slides below

Quality Assurance Presentation from webinars

Notes about learner evidence

OneNote allows us to store a wide variety of media on each page.  It is important to mindful about data protection and copyright.

  • Ensure that learners cannot be identified – remove any personally identifiable content eg names from images, documents etc
  • If using video content. do not embed videos where a pupil is visible. In these cases, you can play the video in a live meeting, have the QA discussion and record the outcome in OneNote.  You should make a note on the document that this has happened
  • Video content such as a walkaround of a product that pupil has created can be stored on pages, as long as it is anonymous as with photo/text based content.
  • If you are using assessment materials that have been commercially created, do not upload them to the pages.

In Practice

This an example of how the West Lothian English Network are using this method to quality assure evidence of National Qualifications.

Whiteboards and Notebooks

There are a number of virtual whiteboard/notebook tools within Glow and these are useful tools for learners to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding – making them effective assessment opportunities.

This video demonstrates how OneNote can be used to make online learning even more interactive.

This is an example of how O365 OneNote could be used with learners to demonstrate their understanding of number, using virtual manipulatives and annotating their thinking on their whiteboard.

O365 also has another dedicated whiteboard tool, separate from OneNote, and this can be used in Teams calls to share thinking and understanding. The whiteboards are automatically saved in your OneDrive and can be edited and annotated to provide feedback to learners.

This video looks at how OneNote could be used for online literacy and English learning, particularly around note-making, and how the educators can assess and provide feedback on this.

This video looks at how Jamboard could be used for online literacy and English learning, particularly around note-making, and how the educators can assess and provide feedback on this.

Assessment within Literacy and English

The videos on this page demonstrate some approaches to formative assessment and feedback with digital tools in Literacy and English learning. These approaches could be adapted to other subjects and we would welcome examples of this Get Involved – DigiLearn (glowscotland.org.uk)

There are a number of virtual whiteboard/notebook tools within Glow and these are useful tools for learners to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding – making them effective assessment opportunities.

We presented a webinar on the use of digital tools and platforms to support online learning and this segment looks at learning activities that could be delivered remotely and how this can be assessed and feedback delivered.

This video demonstrates the use of Jamboard to capture learners’ knowledge and understanding in an online reading context. The Jamboard allows use of ‘sticky notes’ which help learner organiser their ideas alongside others’. The text in this example is a film from the Screening Shorts catalogue available through Glow. 

This segment explores the use of G Suite and Classroom apps to deliver, assess and provide feedback on literacy and English learning.

In this video, Susan, a teacher from Glasgow, explains how she uses Forms to check learners’ understanding and then build on that to develop their knowledge.

This video looks at how OneNote could be used for online literacy and English learning, particularly around note-making, and how the educators can assess and provide feedback on this.

This video looks at how Jamboard could be used for online literacy and English learning, particularly around note-making, and how the educators can assess and provide feedback on this.

Assessment within Numeracy and Mathematics

The videos on this page demonstrate some approaches to formative assessment and feedback with digital tools in Numeracy and Mathematics learning. These approaches could be adapted to other subjects and we would welcome examples of this Get Involved – DigiLearn (glowscotland.org.uk)

There are a number of virtual whiteboard/notebook tools within Glow and these are useful tools for learners to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding – making them effective assessment opportunities.

 

This is an example of how O365 OneNote could be used with learners to demonstrate their understanding of number, using virtual manipulatives and annotating their thinking on their whiteboard.

Part 1 – We delivered this workshop on how to transfer Concrete Pictorial Abstract numeracy and maths teaching practice to the online environment. CPA can be supported effectively with interactive manipulatives and whiteboard/notebook tools.

Part 2 – This video demonstrates the concepts in Part 1 using Jamboard and OneNote to capture assessment evidence.

O365 also has another dedicated whiteboard tool, separate from OneNote, and this can be used in Teams calls to share thinking and understanding. The whiteboards are automatically saved in your OneDrive and can be edited and annotated to provide feedback to learners.

Book Creator is a platform external to Glow but can be effective for capturing learners’ thinking and allows them to create a meaningful end product to showcase their learning. However, it can be added to in an ongoing basis which makes it effective for formative assessment.

Forms and Quizzes

What are Forms?

Microsoft and Google both provide their own version of Forms that can be used to make forms or quizzes. Forms are created to capture information, such as evaluations, and quizzes are created for assessment purposes and can be assigned correct answers and feedback. Forms can include multiple choice, text or numerical input, or even file uploads (such as photos of working) for their answers. Questions can also include links to external sites or include videos form YouTube to facilitate flipped learning.
Feedback has suggested that learners engage with Forms because they adapt to any device, regardless of screen size.

This webinar recording explores the range of features available in Microsoft Forms but Google Forms has a very similar interface and options.

Creating Quizzes for Assessment

The videos in this section demonstrate how to split your Form into sections and add media to a question. The examples are for Microsoft Forms but Google Forms does the exact same and the instructions are almost identical.

Assignments

Assignments are a useful tool for effective assessment. They allow the educator to make clear the learning activities and instructions, including all relevant resources in one place, and enabling learners to respond in a variety of ways with different tools. These assignments can then be posted or shared to communication channels, such as Teams and Classroom, making them easy to access for learners.

Being digital means that it easy for learners to submit learning, the educator to assess it and add feedback then return it, and for the learner to make changes to improve it before submitting for further assessment. Assignments also allow the educator to keep track of all learners’ submissions in one place and to easily track progress with at-a-glance data.

 

Assignments, on both platforms, can contain:

  • Title
  • Instructions – perfect place to explain learning intentions and success criteria, as well as instructions
  • Materials – you can add web links, videos, documents (O365 and G Suite)
  • Rubrics – excellent for making success criteria and feedback clear and transparent for learners
  • Scheduling – time and date to be set and completed
  • Pupils – whole class or individuals only

Assignments using Teams

Assignments using Classroom

More with Assignments on Teams