Running 26.2 for One (VERY IMPORTANT) Realisation

The amateur runner has grabbed a rubber – and not another Cliff Bar. Never would I have thought that four hours and forty-six minutes (seconds don’t matter) of running would result in the action of erasing my social media account. Delete: my life on Instagram is gone. Some black hole online… you’ll find Claire Smith’s profile there. Just after a few mouse clicks, she no longer Instaexists – well, it’s a few presses more complicated. Oh sorry, let me pause the music (or perhaps not) of my words in your head. Hello, my name is Claire and I’m back on the blog – this time, as a second year. Studying what, you’re asking? I analyse stationary, more stationary and stickers. Not really! Apologies: me does like to (ever so occasionally) jazz up my sentences. Education is my field of study with the desire to become a lady in a lanyard (minus the posh aspect).

It’s the 10th of October. Yes, I know. Tell me off or put my name on the red face. A blog post really ought to have been uploaded by now (and my conscience did put on a lion mask and argue with me)! Oh my…the autumn leaf display is long gone; we are welcoming Mr. Pumpkin now! Time has PAST. Usually, my blog posts are a little more frequent, however the start of term seems to have just swept by like dust – vanished in a touch. Whether it was repeatedly angering the pavements (run, run, run) or ensuring my schedule was jam-packed, the e-Portfolio has been left to fend for itself. Too long and too lonely, it has been. A previous module, ‘Working Together,’ and several digital inputs during my initial year taught me that the arrow of progress requires you to go back down. Yes, go down to your seat – and write. So: here I am. Back again. Ready to tell you about an experience which taught me more than: my flesh, bones and heart are proud to be painted in blue and white with a ‘x’ pattern.

A few weeks ago, the Converse were traded for Brooks to quickly wander 26ish miles for CHAS (a children’s hospice charity in Scotland). The 2018 Loch Ness marathon, for sure, took a toll on my poor feet. The tiny, sign-up box covered all the after-pain and blisters: that aspect didn’t bother me. Although, legislation never confirmed that a relationship would be broken afterwards. Devastating times, these were. Running supposedly ‘improves’ your blood-pumping muscle, yet my heart was broken mine into several segments! How glad should we be that our organs aren’t made of china… Spending four hours (and exactly 46 minutes more) pounding resulted in a realisation, an epiphany about social media. Owls have never required it…so why have I constantly been feeding my time this perpetually hungry monster! Let’s say this: I’m glad that an extra half hour is slotted back into my day. More natural daylight can allow my pupils to dilate. Or, I can (also) glance over my books for a little longer.

I broke up with Instagram. Not sure if that was made clear. Thanks Loch Ness.
Are you an Instragrammer? Are you a face on the online book? Or, is Twitter sending your stream of thoughts flying? I love those websites – but, enough was enough. We all have different personalities; we all use social media to a different extent. However, my constant addiction to informing the world of my ideas was equating to #teninstastories a day. I’m aware that Facebook is much more common, so for those whose brains are searching for light in SPACE… Instagram stories are simply snapshots of your adventures in the world. Trip down Tesco’s stationary isle: imperative to inform my teaching pals about the Sharpie deal! Met a friend for coffee: aesthetical mug must be shared. Quickly wandering around a loch: better make everyone thirsty to visit Scotland. Share, share, shared my life. I guess… you could have easily given me the label of a ‘social media’ addict. And, I no longer needed that.

The marathon was rather long and… like anything that is long… you have time to contemplate. Running does count as your sixty minutes of exercise of day – as reminded by the NHS – but it also allows me to plan ahead (and not merely the route home). For this reason, my phone is left indoors to stay cosy and rest. Yes, material objects do need cared for! On the other hand, some marathon enthusiasts (because they kept grinning) went to the extent of taking a photo to share – or even Facetiming to inform that: “Mummy is doing fine but will not win the race.” What a laugh! Indeed… the pain in my feet eased upon my ears picking up on such a comment! But, such words also reminded me: Instagram was my shadow during the day. If I can run 26 miles free of music or a device, I ought to make it through daylight without this clutch.

Then came the recovery. After the run, I took the moment to pause and reflect – and not just because the muscles demanded some time off. Lectures commenced the following day, so it was only natural to consider things related to teaching. Oh, I did consider whether I could swap my train (to the super-speed one in Hunger Games) to save arriving back just before teaching began. Fiction will never be fact, however. The worry that our children are missing out on a real childhood… due to a (potentially poisoning) digital age… is of concern to me. Blisters heal, but a stolen 18 years (okay, less than that!) leaves permeant scars. And, can we recover from a lost childhood? Communication, it’s a face- to face matter.

What if our toddlers fasten their ‘digital shoes’ and never grow out of playing on Mummy’s Ipad? That may be hypothetical, but my brain cells fizzle at the prospect of it soon being a plain and harsh truth. A report – sent out to our Primary Teaching cohort – came back into the less dusty part of my cerebrum and confirmed my thoughts. Sometimes social media traps you: The Life in Likes 2018 report by the Children’s Commissioner wrote of the digital platforms as being advantage for holding “fun conversations” with friends yet many children felt forced to remain online… even if they desired to fiddle with their toys. The same emotion expressed as me earlier: helpless. The bubble of social media is rather comforting. I accept that. Nonetheless, there comes a time when you must see the real world for what it is. For me, the marathon was the needle in the balloon. Social media was my superglue. We all know how powerful that chemical is: no wonder Prit Stick occupies the shelf!

So, what am I saying? I am saying that as an educator, it is essential that we drill into the students’ heads the impact of too much social media usage. A recent campaign called the ‘Digital 5 A Day’ is a carbon-copy of our infamous fruit and vegetable diet suggestion – and it certainly of interest. It suggests five different points to help us take advantage of the networking sites (and our phones). Although munching through five apples a day will likely spike up your glucose-chart, it certainly is healthier than letting your digestive proteins work through the meat of McNuggets. (P.S. Everyone desires to change ‘five-day’ to every second one!) Anyway, back to squirting more info for you: ketchup (i.e. constant gadget usage) can also be applied to the computer – but such actions must mean an acting degree and job as a ‘toddler’ is on your CV. Emotional issues can result if we indulge beyond sensible boundaries, as you will soon read about! Overusing social media, like anything, can cause considerable issues – as I’ve discovered myself. Balance is key. Sorry, that’s actually an ‘overused’ statement. Oh no, better be back at the desk to find more linguistic devices. Let me turn off my phone first.

Having no technology around me was beautiful (even more bonnie than the hills of the Highlands). Although, life in the cobbled streets of fundee (deliberate mistake!) requires more than a horse and carriage. Loch Lomond, without my mobile, was just as AMUSING as life in Dundee with a block that receives signals. In the classroom, the same sort of situation is happening. One day there may be a ‘no phone’ fundraiser – and happiness cannot be measured. Yet, rules mean that any more than 24 hours without devices… and our human rights have been breached. This ‘logic’ even applies to the kids, the people who ought to p.l.a.y. Infants don’t need to learn how to type ‘play’ quickly on a keyboard! Despite the SPR wanting teachers to “include a variety of media” – hint, hint… digital, that is – in the lessons, being given a proper lanyard will only make me want to do the opposite. Arrogant: that adjective may fit me…oops. It’s merely that evidence implies our children are needing more than a ‘time-out’ from digital devices.

Social media is a problem: common knowledge, that is – so I hope your thumbs are up. What we need to consider is the seed that was responsible for the weeds (and time in the bin). Hands down…with or without gardening gloves on…I declare the mobile phone to be accountable. Evidence agrees. Zaheem (2014) writes of scientists finding detrimental health effects – that includes changes in brain activity, reaction times, and sleep patterns – being associated with mobile phone usage. Thinking reflectively, there are many times in which my Snapchat Bitmoji will have taken longer gain zzzs next to its face – and my human productivity level will have certainly decreased as the sun rose again! Lack of sleep (from mobile phone usage) is a short-term consequence, however. Take the long-term consequence, that being poorer academic performance and emotional regulation, and the minefield has become substantially greater. Kuznekoff, J. and Titsworth, S. (2013) carried out an interesting study which highlights the aforementioned point. During a video lecture, the students who did not have access to a digital device took in 62 percent more information than their counterpoints. An average higher grade (by one and a half) was also achieved by the group without technology at hand. Soul-destroying: an over-reliance to our phones is essentially lowering our chances in life. A phone bucket can surely sit in a locked-away cupboard with an opening and closing time of THE SCHOOL BELL. It’s not torture, this idea: having a pet taught me something about cruelty being kind. Or, so I learnt.

A famous figure who helps push forward the devices to host the (sometimes) parasite of social media pats my back. Interestingly, Tim Cook (now head of Apple) remarked of not wanting his nephew to have a social media account. Could this perhaps be a result studies warning us of the lack of self-esteem as well as identity-crisis that children are facing? Maybe so. According to Ahmad, Soomro and Jan (2017) there is a linear relationship between increased time on Facebook and a lower self-esteem. If there was an emoji button on scientific studies, I’d put the tear-faced one next to the following finding in a social media study by Burrow and Rainone (2017): the number of likes for your profile picture partly determines how positively you think of yourself. Ssh…shh…shoking. I just want my students (potentially our future teachers) to let themselves thrive from experiences – and not the number of likes. And, does your opinion match with mine?

Call me ‘outdated’ or a crazy runner that is trying to teach: but, push yourself to live without a phone and you’ll (maybe) see why. Running the marathon taught me more about social media than the constant newsfeed. Why? First-hand experiences always wins. VisitScotland and Google if you ought to learn more: I better go for a walk. Another adventure may be calling, but it won’t be running through the wheat fields of Instagram. Nah. As the Scots say, “Naw, thank ye.”

After all I’ve said, no photos of the run should appear on this blog … except this is a rare find! After all, how often does Nessie come out from her den?                                                                       After all, there is no ‘like’ this post self-esteem candy!


Blog Post References (Harvard Style)

Ahmad, N., Soomro, A.S. and Jan, M. (2017) ‘Impact of Social Media on Self-Esteem’, European Scientific Journal, 13(23), pp. 329-341. doi: 10.19044/esj.2017.v13n23p329

Burrow, A. L., & Rainone, N. (2017). ‘How many likes did I get?: Purpose moderates links between positive social media feedback and self-esteem.’ Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 69, 232-236. doi: 10.1016/j.jesp.2016.09.005

Gibbs, S. (2008) Apple’s Tim Cook: ‘I don’t want my nephew on a social network.’ Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/jan/19/tim-cook-i-dont-want-my-nephew-on-a-social-network (Accessed: 4 October 2018)

Kuznekoff, J. and Titsworth, S. (2013) ‘The Impact of Mobile Phone Usage on Student Learning’, Communication Education, 62(3), pp. 233-252. doi: 10.1080/03634523.2013.767917.

Naheem, Z. (2014) ‘Health risks associated with mobile phone use’, International Journal of Health Sciences, 8(4), pp. 5-6. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350886/