Let’s bubble about – right now!

Perhaps, perhaps, perhaps… we should play. Why don’t we collect our pennies, count them up and link hands in a chain to the toy shop? Hand in hand, we trot (and try not gallop) to Smyths. Who doesn’t adore an hour in the den of all dens, shops of all shops? Some adults. But, for those delightful in simplicity, when the trip is over… Walt Disney does remind us that: “Adults are only kids grown up, anyway.” Anyway, he has a theory here. A theory that is much more than a theory: reality. That’s my (no laughter) Mickey Mouse take on it. I better go fetch my ears and put them on right now. Here we…. GO. Are you friends with Mary Poppins too?

Thought so. Let’s bubble on, now.

Pish posh to stern philosophical outlooks for two seconds. “Disney, as ever, is rather inspirational….!” I don’t believe that (and that’s only my view). I don’t see any person being fit to be called that word over another person as we all – in our own book – make a blank page have character. In teaching, you see one student who grapples with a concept grinning from one side of the rainbow to the other when the ‘oh-yeah’ moment gives them the educational gold. For another, the ‘graphite’ hexagons neatly fitting together in his or her brain might be significantly easier – and so “ooooo… that’s it” is emitted out of audible speech. That is why, well, for me inspiration must come from yourself. And, blatantly, your own progress is for no other single person to comment on. I remember starting University…concerned about achieving As… but well, for me it isn’t a priority. Trying matters. That’s part of the assembly of the toy, of an idea, of a book.

And, Walt Disney did fail many times. But he kept with his idea, his own little ‘toy.’ That’s why I rather believe we are all very much inclined to love his art – and undeniably, his story books. Books, you see, are an essential part of teacher education. From Vygotsky to Piaget, we learn. And learn. And, secretly try to figure out how we are developing ourselves as educators. But. Library days can only take you to a certain level of understanding. Lecturers constantly tell us of the imperativeness of writing about your strengths, your weakness and the movements forward. I agree; I do try to read factual works for enhancement: I do try to take an upwards approach to learning. However, some realisation has led me back to another square that I’m convinced is more of a triangle with another line to it. Not to another course is it bringing me, but to a moment of pause in my professional journey. After all, toy cars from Smyths aren’t intended to withstand several batters and bashes daily. We do need  ‘wait’ and ‘recapture’ time.

Time to separate the key words from the text, is it now. What for me is most crucial during this stage of my teacher education is figuring out the nuances to teaching – and classroom experience stories are all that is required. Remember when the nursery staff would come and give you a tip to be help make that tower look less like Italy’s (famous or infamous… I’m not entirely sure!) Pisa? Well, that is what I’m mentally making a note these days. Writing for assignments gives me the knowledge, but the breadth comes with the ‘you assist the child with the zip, yet leave them to attempt it if possible’ comments. That is why I am here. These pieces of advice mould me into a teacher who will (hopefully) as many of us wrote in our application… make a difference. Everyone, or so I wish to think, goes into the profession to bring out the best in others. By sharing a piece of humanity, of your own experiences, the heart in education beats on with the same rhythm.

The policies, lack of funding and health and safety – which we hear through the news more than word of mouth – puts on the rain too heavily sometimes. The career, of being a teacher, is being destroyed (sometimes) by what the child must achieve, must do and must obtain. Without stating the obvious, qualifications are extremely crucial but so is contact with others, so is PLAYTIME. And…health and safety is creating a gigantic wall…like that of Mexico.

After hearing that a former headteacher couldn’t obtain a swing for health and safety reasons, I desired to scribble : with frustration, with fury, with flaming anger. Sounds a tad over the top… but… well society needs to take a breather. Health and safety: uh-huh, the Law is imperative. But, what is wrong with a swing? For all you know, you could be hit on the road from misjudging a car speed or land awkwardly after a (as safe as possible) wall jump. Honestly. A swing moves up and down and let’s the child take control of their movement and emotions. Bare not, can I, to see a playground without such apparatus, without such necessities. Accidents happen. It’s life. And yes, we can avoid some but not every. single. One.

Play (and relaxed play) is what we need more of. Have a read of the Scottish Government’s 2013 Play Strategy: please do. To save you leaving to fetch it right now, here’s Scotland’s play vision: “A nation which values play as a life-enhancing daily experience for all our children and young people; in their homes, nurseries, schools and communities.” (Scottish Government, 2013, p. 2) Within merely opening the booklet, we see the phrase ‘LIFE-ENHANCING.’ Then, why is it that: our children are using i-Pads to clock up that screen time; our outdoors have no door; and our older ones play with the rubbers on their desks? I still play. Yes, I do. I am legally an adult, yet the amusement of following the yellow lines until they stop (in a quiet area!) or throwing up and down a ball will never leave moi. I do doodle: and well, at least it helps me with creative writing of some sort.

Early Years children become excited over miniscule parts of life – but that is what is crucial to the LOVE of teaching. That is why we must never treat play as only a reward. That home corner where you learned that hoovers make a noise: yes, it was really only fake plastic beads. But, imagination can become reality. That clean-up with my friends translates into ‘let’s tidy the classroom in P7!’ Play gives children hope, belief and an ‘I can do this’ attitude. Bring Smyths back to the classroom. Please do. Adults, it’s time to be silly but with a sprinkling of prudency (and sugar too!). We all have that inner-child that can be effectively controlled. I know we do.