Reading, Chapter Five Hargie (2011)

The main aim of the chapter is to emphasize the variety of questioning and where and how they can be applied. The writer explored the themes of the types and ranges of questions, the purpose of questioning and the outcomes of questioning. I agree with the idea that children feel scared to answer questions wrongly. …

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The main aim of the chapter is to emphasize the variety of questioning and where and how they can be applied.

The writer explored the themes of the types and ranges of questions, the purpose of questioning and the outcomes of questioning.

I agree with the idea that children feel scared to answer questions wrongly. The chapter explains that “children assume that adults will ask reasonable questions, and so they feel under pressure to respond to the expectations inherent in these questions”. Some children fear that they will answer the questioned incorrectly and show that they do not know the answer.

Although I agree with most of what is written in the chapter, I do not agree with the statement “some open questions place more restriction upon respondents than others.” I disagree with this because open questions allow for more varied and detailed answers that you may not be able to get from a closed question. Open questions give people encouragement and choice to speak and respond. The answer could be time consuming depending on the volume of the response as it has to be detailed. This questioning type is used by doctors or interviewers.

One word in which I was unsure about was ubiquitous. The definition is: present, appearing, or found everywhere.

Overall, the chapter was an interesting piece and it has allowed me to have a deeper understanding of questioning.

Reference: ‘Finding out about others: the skill of questioning’, in Hargie, O. (2011) Skilled Interpersonal Communication: Research, Theory and Practice. 5th ed. London: Routledge.