Energy

Non-renewable energies  Are limited sources of energy that take along time to renew (sometimes hundreds or thousands of years), (Shinn, 2018) Coal Could run out in 150 years Natural Gas Will run out in 52 years if no new deposits are found Oil Could be gone in 53 years (ecotricity, 2016) Renewable energy “comes from …

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  • Non-renewable energies
    •  Are limited sources of energy that take along time to renew (sometimes hundreds or thousands of years), (Shinn, 2018)
      • Coal
        • Could run out in 150 years
      • Natural Gas
        • Will run out in 52 years if no new deposits are found
      • Oil
        • Could be gone in 53 years

(ecotricity, 2016)

  • Renewable energy
    • “comes from natural sources or processes that are constantly replenished,” (Shinn, 2018)
    • Wind
    • Wave
    • Solar
    • Biofuel

Windmills debate

We debated the pros and cons of wind farms.

We first split into groups of four and collected all key information we could find to support both sides of the argument. I found this difficult as I let my opinion dictate what information I collected rather than gathering information for both side of the debate. For pupils it might be best to be tasked with either the pros or cons to make it easier for them to research efficiently.  Two groups then joined to compose arguments and then the whole class were assigned either for or against. From here we gathered all the arguments and evidence we had and presented them. For each of the six rounds of the debate the ‘for’ group went first and then the ‘against’ group followed with a rebuttal.

This type of debate is called the hot air balloon debate (or simply the balloon debate). The basic idea of the balloon debate is that a hot air balloon is going down and in in order save it, objects or people need to be chucked overboard. A debate for and against each person or object is presented and then the class votes on whether the person or object should stay or get chucked overboard. This can be done with a wide variety of different subjects (Teach Primary, 2016).

Another type of debate is the four corner debate where, in four corners of the room, the words ‘strongly agree’, ‘agree’, ‘disagree’ and ‘strongly disagree’. A statement is read out and the children have time to think and/or write down their response to the statement. The children are then asked to go to the corner that comes closest to their original opinion. The children can then discuss their opinions in their corners and then present a group response to the statement (The Teacher Toolkit, n.d.).

Instruction vs. Tinkering

Another activity we did was to build a car which we had to make move without pushing it. The cohort were split into two groups; one group were given set material and instructions that needed to be followed, the other group were given a variety of different material and were told to build a car. We were then brought together at the end to compare the different ways of doing this activity.

Building the car with instructions was fun however we missed out on developing communication and group working skills that are vital for pupils to develop. Using instructions does have its merits, such as everyone having the same end product and having more structure to a lesson. Building the care out of a variety of materials is known as tinkering. “Tinkering is part of a hands-on, trial and error-based process that rewards persistence, resourcefulness, and self-sufficiency,” (Learning is Open, 2017). These are all important things to develop in children. The hands-on process helps to engage pupils who may not be so academic and the trial and error process helps to build resilience. Tinkering can open up more of a free flowing work space that helps students and teachers learn more about each other in a relaxed setting.
I believe tinkering is valuable for children’s education which can build self-confidence, communication and resilience. Tinkering also links to the experiences and outcomes in ‘Craft, Design, Engineering and Graphics’ under technologies (Education Scotland, 2018).

Resources

https://www.parliament.uk/education/teaching-resources-lesson-plans/primary-school-debating-pack/

https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/non-renewable-energy/

References

Ecotricity, (2016) The End of Fossil Fuels [Online] Available: https://www.ecotricity.co.uk/our-green-energy/energy-independence/the-end-of-fossil-fuels [Accessed: 16 November 2019]

Education Scotland (2018) Experiences and Outcomes [Online] Available: https://education.gov.scot/education-scotland/scottish-education-system/policy-for-scottish-education/policy-drivers/cfe-building-from-the-statement-appendix-incl-btc1-5/experiences-and-outcomes/#all [Accessed: 18 November 2019]

The Exploratory (2017) Tinkering and Making [Online] Available: https://learningisopen.org/toolkit/tinkering-making/ [Accessed: 17 November 2019]

Shinn, Lora (2018) Renewable Energy: The Clean Facts [Online] Available: https://www.nrdc.org/stories/renewable-energy-clean-facts [Accessed: 16 November 2019]

The Teacher Toolkit (n.d.) Four Corners [Online] Available: http://www.theteachertoolkit.com/index.php/tool/four-corners [Accessed: 17 November 2019]

Teaching Primary (2016) Implementing debates in the primary classroom  [Online] Available: https://www.teachprimary.com/learning_resources/view/implementing-debates-in-the-primary-classroom [Accessed: 17 November 2019]

energy

Energy As we are all aware, we only have a finite amount of natural resources, and as such we are running out of them faster than we can produce them. Although this is a fact that is well known, as teachers we need to get this across to children and reinforce that we as humans … Continue reading energy

Energy

As we are all aware, we only have a finite amount of natural resources, and as such we are running out of them faster than we can produce them. Although this is a fact that is well known, as teachers we need to get this across to children and reinforce that we as humans have a responsibility to do something about it. This links to another theme that we explored, climate change. When we burn Fossil fuels, they generate high quantities of carbon dioxide, this can lead to a change in the climate as carbon emissions trap heat in the atmosphere.

Our first impute for todays theame was a very different approach from the rest. In today’s workshop we had a debate on whether renewable energy such as windmills were harmful to the environment or not. Todays class was very student led, we were given a guideline on what to research and were provided with articles on Moodle. I found this approach effective in terms of being more involving and retaining more information as I was actively looking for it myself. I feel I can implement this in teaching as children learn better when they are interested and involved with the lesson. By making lessons more child led and there being little input of the teacher gives children a sense of responsibility and in-dependency. After researching, the class was divided into two and each side chose whether they were for or against windmills. We choose for. As someone who doesn’t really talk much in class, I targeted my focus on the research aspect of the debate and wrote down many strong points that I felt argued our case well. Having my friends in my group made all the difference, as one of them volunteered me to speak in the debate. If this was two years ago I wold have strongly rejected the offer, however this course has constantly pushed my level of comfort by putting me in scenarios that make me uncomfortable and stressed. However, I have tried to mend my thinking by telling myself the more practice I get at speaking out loud, the better it will make me as a person and more importantly as a teacher. So, I said yes. Thinking about this from a teacher’s perspective I understand the strength of friends and having them in the same group, as they can encourage children that may not be comfortable in these situations and give them the confidence they lack. However, I also understand the advantages of mixing children up, it encourages them to bond over a common aim, and get along with people that they may not get on with and listen to their opinions. Participating in this debate developed a lot of my skills, research skills, collaborative skills, and my speaking skills, all skills that are highlighted in the General Teaching Standards. Curriculum for Excellence wants us as teachers to create confident individuals, and by incorporating small activities like these tests their abilities and encourages them to step outside their comfort zone in a safe and familiar environment. (Curriculum for Excellence 2016)

Our last input of energy was again a much different approach. As a class we were divided into two sections. My section was given a sheet with instructions that showed how to make a car out of very basic materials such as card, wooden sticks and cardboard. The instructions only showed how to make the car, however, our job was to make the car move without touching it, we were given additional materials such as rubber bands, balloons and paper clips. I enjoyed this activity, mainly because it was straightforward and clear on what we had to do. The instruction was concise and there were small pictures on the side as a reference, which proved very helpful at times when we were unsure. The element of a visual aid in a classroom id very effective as it provides children with a rough outline and guide. The second part of the activity was where we were able to use our initiative and creativity. We were able to successfully get the car to move using rubber bands and paper clips. After, both groups were accumulated together, and we discussed to one another our process. Instantly I could see the difference just by looking at their cars, everyone’s car in the other group was differnet, were as in my group we all the same structure, and people and gained on this by adding small decorations. I later learned that both groups were given the same task, make the car move with out touching it. However, where my groups had instructions on how to build the car, the second group were given none and were just given a random assortment of materials and told to build their own. This process of freedom and ability to use intuition and creativity is known as “Tinkering”.

After critically analysing both methods of practice I learned the benefits to both processes in a classroom. Since my group were given instructions, and set resources, it allowed us to be calmer and more relaxed as everyone knew what they were doing. There was also no pressure to create your own car. However, this may also cause concerns in a classroom, and some children may find it frustrating following instructions and may find the concept of instructions limiting as they cannot explore much. The solution for this would be to work with a pencil for so that no mistakes would be made before going on to something more concreate like a pen. Another reason why this method is effective in a classroom is because everyone is making the same product, no on has drastically different outcomes and this therefore eliminates the factor of competition. Assessment and experiences and outcomes are easier to manage as everyone has had the same experience of building a car. Through the guidelines of the CfE as future teacher I can monitor the skills that children are developing in using tools, equipment and materials.

 

The tinkering approach allows a sense of freedom but still in forcing rough guidelines. This method invites a divergent process in which there is no set plan and ideas that are constantly changing and developing. It encourages innovation, which develops skills such as curiosity, problem solving and the ability to take initiative. In a classroom I feel this approach may be well reflected

Energy

Before starting this topic, I have very little knowledge of energy. I knew different types of energies but would find this extremely difficult to be able to teach this efficiently. I had very little justification of why sustainable energies are better; only it is better for the environment. Therefore, studying this topic has expanded my … Continue reading Energy

Before starting this topic, I have very little knowledge of energy. I knew different types of energies but would find this extremely difficult to be able to teach this efficiently. I had very little justification of why sustainable energies are better; only it is better for the environment. Therefore, studying this topic has expanded my knowledge significantly.

Cambridge dictionary describes energy power as

“The power from something such as electricity or oil that can do work, such as providing light and heat.”

(Cambridge Dictionary, 2019).

Therefore, energy is extracting the use of atoms from Gas, oil, and coal and using this to provide lighting, electricity, and heat in homes. We rely on energy so much it is the foundation of our lives without this we would not have hot water in homes, refrigerators and cars.

For more information on energy check the link below.

The Curriculum for Excellence values energy as an important topic and uses this as one of their experiences and outcomes-

 “Through exploring non-renewable energy sources, I can describe how they are used in Scotland today and express an informed view on the implications for their future use.” SCN 2-04b

(Scottish Government, 2017)

Therefore, this shows that energy is an extremely important issue that we need to be addressing to children in schools. Afterall this is necessary as this will be their generation that deals with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(BBC Bitesize images, 2019)

Unfortunately, many of our most used energy sources stem from fossil fuels -Gas, oil, and coal. These are un-reusable and are slowly running out (BBC Bitesize, 2019). These fossil fuels are also releasing harmful carbon dioxide contributing to climate change (ScienceDaily, 2019). Therefore, there is a big effort on using renewable energies such as wind, solar and wave. In particular, Scotland realises the importance of this by targeting 100% of its energy in 2020 to be renewable sources (Scottish Government, 2019).

With a topic such as energy power, there is potential to do many active learning lessons. This relates to Kolbs theory on experimental learning, children learn more when they have a hands-on experience. They are able to make the connections easier and it becomes a more meaningful and memorable experience form this. This is simply happens, when instead of learning about something in books and worksheets it transitions into an experiment or practical task. This makes a real difference in learning (Baker. Jensen. Kolb, 2002).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For example, hydroelectric energy weight lifting system. This allows children to be able to comprehend the ability of powered energy which running tap water can do. It provides a powered line that lifts up a weighted cup. I think that children would really have fun with this activity as I found myself amazed that running water could lift up a cup with marbles. Children may find it fascinating to test the boundaries of this type of experience. This follows Brookfield’s 4 lenses of reflection as it uses Kolb’s experimental learning as theory and the imagined view from a pupil’s perspective to become a critically reflective teacher (Brookfield, 2005).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another class experiment that a class could do is solar-powered miniature cars. This involves using the light from a lamp to power connected mini car to make a toy car move. In class when we performed this I was capitated by this and I tried to see if distances/angles from the panel made difference in the direction of the car. This study of powered energy in class could transition into an interdisciplinary topic from the solar panel car to doing a ‘dragons’ den’ type of activity. Children could design a renewable energy car.  For example-

  • Literacy using persuasive writing as their pitch
  • Art/ICT as their designing of the car
  • Maths to work out costs
  • Science to have an understanding of energy types

Doing valuable learning opportunities like this incorporates many elements of the curriculum that will build a better and deeper understanding of knowledge in a child. The general teaching council understands through interdisciplinary learning this creates more impactful learning that children benefit greatly from.  The GTC states in their standards that teachers need the ability to

1.1.2 “Acquire the knowledge and understanding to fulfill their responsibilities in respect of cross curricular themes including citizenship, creativity, enterprising attitudes, literacy and numeracy; personal, social and health education; and ICT, as appropriate to the sector and stage of education.”

The Curriculum for Excellence Scotland’s education provider also encourages cross curricular and interdisciplinary learning through its flexible learning (Education Government Scotland, 2019).

Therefore this shows that the GTC and the Curriculum for Excellence both agree that interdisciplinary learning is more effective and meaningful work.

After this topic, I feel that I am more aware of what the topic energy is I am now more knowledgeable and able to speak about this effective rather than listing types of energy there is. I have gained the graduate attribute of ambitious and creative as the idea of the solar panel car ‘dragons’ den’ class idea was my own idea. I thought about this as I thought if I was in the shoes of a child how would I like to have learned about this in a topic. Although this is quite ambitious I think this could be very effective if it was well organised.

For more information on other types of renewable and non-renewable energy check the link below.

 

 

 

 

 

References

Baker, A.C., Jensen, P.J. and Kolb, D.A., 2002. Conversational learning: An experiential approach to knowledge creation. Greenwood Publishing Group.

BBC Bitesize. (2019). Fossil fuels – Revision 1 – KS3 Chemistry – BBC Bitesize. [online] Available at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z27thyc/revision/1 [Accessed 19 Nov. 2019].

Brookfield, S. (2005) Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher. San Francisco. Jossey Bass

Cambridge Dictionary. (2019). ENERGY | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary. [online] Available at: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/energy [Accessed 18 Nov. 2019].

Education Government Scotland. (2019). What is Curriculum for Excellence? | Curriculum for Excellence | Policy drivers | Policy for Scottish education | Scottish education system | Education Scotland. [online] Available at: https://education.gov.scot/education-scotland/scottish-education-system/policy-for-scottish-education/policy-drivers/cfe-building-from-the-statement-appendix-incl-btc1-5/what-is-curriculum-for-excellence [Accessed 19 Nov. 2019].

ScienceDaily. (2019). Fossil fuel. [online] Available at: https://www.sciencedaily.com/terms/fossil_fuel.htm [Accessed 18 Nov. 2019].

Scottish Government (2017). Benchmarks sciences. [Online] https://education.gov.scot/improvement/documents/sciencesbenchmarkspdf.pdf [Accessed: 19 October 2019].

Scottish Government. (2019). Renewable and low carbon energy: Onshore wind. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.scot/policies/renewable-and-low-carbon-energy/onshore-wind/ [Accessed 19 Nov. 2019].

Standard for Initial Teacher Education. (2006). Edinburgh: The General Teaching Council.

Energy

Energy is a topic that is being heavily debated right now especially amongst world leaders. In recent years people have gained an awareness of the inevitable end of fossil fuels with most people realising the importance of using renewable energy. Although there is infinite evidence for the extinction of coal, oil and gas some people …

Continue reading “Energy”

Energy is a topic that is being heavily debated right now especially amongst world leaders. In recent years people have gained an awareness of the inevitable end of fossil fuels with most people realising the importance of using renewable energy. Although there is infinite evidence for the extinction of coal, oil and gas some people are still in denial that they will run out.

Within the last two hundred years the fossil fuel intake has majorly increased causing irreversible damage to supply and the environment, especially in respects to climate change. Around 90% of carbon emissions is due to fossil fuel human activity this emission is having effects on issues like pollution which has majorly increased in the air and ocean Ecotricity, (2019).

In the lecture we discussed that this subject could possibly scare children so as teachers we must also always remember to ensure children not to worry because Scotland is one of the most environmentally forward countries in the whole world.

However, teaching this subject to children is still incredibly important as they must understand the severe damage that society has caused to natural resources. Curriculum for Excellence, (2006) highlights the importance of teachers developing responsible citizens. Teaching a subject like energy allows teachers to inform children about their significant responsibility to promote a greener world which can be done by using alternative energy sources. As teachers we must encourage children to realise that these issues affect their present and future which is why they should take a stance in fighting for a greener tomorrow. However, in order to encourage this, we must first educate children by creating experiences that allow them to develop a sense of duty. Teachers should also encourage children to think local and act global. A good way to promote this to the full school is through the eco hooks award. This allows children to gain an insight into how their small decisions can have negative and positive impacts on the world, for example a negative small decision to drop litter is adding to a huge environmental problem.

The first input and lecture gave me a good insight into how I can teach children about energy. The lecture inspired me to introduce the topic to children they can make a list of all the things that they do everyday that requires energy like taking a shower, walking/driving to school and brushing their teeth this can help them to realise that energy surrounds us and is vital to everyday life. The first input also gave me some simple ways that I can teach children about energy through science. Curriculum for Excellence, (2006) highlights that learning through science allows children to investigate their environment, realise the influence that science has on their own lives and others as well as its impact on the environment. It also highlights that science allows children to gain skills like enquiry, investigative and analytical thinking. This car activity shows simply to children how new energy sources like light act as a force of power to move things.

In the second input we had a debate about wind farms. We began by researching the set articles independently and writing points for both advantages and disadvantages then presented our findings in groups of four. We were then put in larger groups to repeat this process then finally we were given our side of the argument and had to combine all our information to make our five strongest arguments.

Education Scotland (2019) has an exemplar of a debate that took place in Douglas Academy with viewpoints from teachers and students. In the exemplar one student speaks about the benefits the debate experience has had on them like gaining transferable skills such as analysing, structuring and confidence. Across the teaching staff they highlighted that it is helping the students to develop their confidence, sensibility, organising and political literacy skills as well as gain an awareness around global issues. For me as a student I felt that this learning experience was very successful for me as not only did I have to find my own information, but I also learned a great deal from my peers which for me is a bit easier and I take more in. From researching about debating in schools and experiencing it from a learner’s perspective I now know the pedagogical benefits that this method of learning has on children and their skills. Which is why I will be using it in the classroom especially when teaching about controversial global issues. Reflecting to the micro-teaching experience where I used the Kolb (1984) Experimental Learning Cycle I identified that I wanted to improve my public speaking skills so I set a goal to practise public speaking whenever I could. This experience has allowed me to do this in small to large groups. Reflecting on this experience and asking my peers if they thought I had improved we all agreed that I was more relaxed and clear this time.

In the second week the cohort was split into two groups and put into separate rooms where each section was both asked to make a car but with different approaches:

Structural

Tinkering

The structural group were given instructions whereas the tinkering group were just asked to use their creative thinking with the materials set out. When we came together as a cohort, we discussed some of the benefits and costs that each method had. The structural side agreed that they felt relaxed and as future teachers this approach allows you to know the resources required. However, we agreed that with this approach you need to be precise meaning no room creativity. The tinkering side agreed that we had a great sense of accomplishment as we made our idea come to life however it was stressful, and from a teacher’s perspective it is complicated to facilitate. The GTC standards (2019) highlights the importance of having good working relationships with your peers/colleagues. The tinkering approach allowed me to work collaboratively with new people and build new relationships.

Curriculum for Excellence. (2006) Building the Curriculum 1 Available: https://education.gov.scot/Documents/btc1.pdf [Accessed: 20 November 2019]
Ecotricity. (2019) When will fossil fuels run out? [Online] Available: https://www.ecotricity.co.uk/our-green-energy/energy-independence/the-end-of-fossil-fuels [Accessed: 20 November 2019].
Education Scotland. (2019) Douglas Academy – Debating and public speaking. Available: https://education.gov.scot/improvement/practice-exemplars/douglas-academy-debating-and-public-speaking [Accessed: 20 November 2019]
General Teaching Council for Scotland. (2019) Overview of the Standards. Available: https://www.gtcs.org.uk/professional-standards/engaging-with-the-standards/overview-of-the-standards.aspx [Accessed: 20 November 2019]
Kolb, D. (1984) Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of learning and Development. New jersey: Prentice-Hall.
Matthews, P. Scherr, I. (2019) Annual Compendium of Scottish Energy Statistics Available: https://www.gov.scot/binaries/content/documents/govscot/publications/publication/2019/05/energy-consumer-action-plan-putting-consumers-heart-scotlands-energy-transition/documents/annual-compendium-scottish-energy-statistics/annual-compendium-scottish-energy-statistics/govscot%3Adocument/annual-compendium-scottish-energy-statistics.pdf [Accessed: 20 November 2019]

Disasters

“A disaster is a sudden, calamitous event that seriously disrupts the functioning of a community or society and causes human, material, and economic or environmental losses that exceed the community’s or society’s ability to cope using its own resources. Though often caused by nature, disasters can have human origins” (IRFC, 2019) Disasters are split into …

Continue reading “Disasters”

  • “A disaster is a sudden, calamitous event that seriously disrupts the functioning of a community or society and causes human, material, and economic or environmental losses that exceed the community’s or society’s ability to cope using its own resources. Though often caused by nature, disasters can have human origins”
    • (IRFC, 2019)
  • Disasters are split into two main categories; man – made and natural.
    • Man made disasters
      • “events that are caused by humans and occur in or close to human settlements.”
      • Examples are famine, industrial accidents, transport accidents, famine and other complex emergencies or conflicts.
        • (IRFC, 2019)
    • Natural disasters
      • “naturally  occurring physical phenomena caused either by rapid or slow onset events”
      • Examples are split into four categories
        • Geophysical: earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis and volcanic activity
        • Hydrological: avalanches and floods
        • Meteorological: cyclones, tornadoes, storm/wave surges, and other extreme weather
        • Biological: disease epidemics and insect/animal plagues
          •  (IRFC, 2019)
  • A countries capability to be able to deal with a disaster relies on three factors;
    •  Preparedness
    • Response
    • Recovery
  • This can be seen most clearly when comparing Japan’s 9.0 magnitude earthquake in  March 2011 and Haiti’s 7.0 magnitude earthquake in January 2010.
Japan Haiti
Preparation ·       Prepared for earthquake

·       People had hard hats and protective headgear

·       Not prepared for following tsunami

·       Around 2 million Haitians live on land that they don’t own (In Port-au-Prince 67% of the 2.4 million population live in ‘Informal Areas’)

·       Buildings can be put up anywhere without proper foundations or planning

·       Only 30% had access to sanitation

·       Only 54% had access to clean water

·       History of corruption and violence within the political history

·       Badly prepared

Impact (numbers) ·       2,000 people confirmed dead (10,000 more expected to be dead)

·       2,000 people injured

·       530,000 people displaced

·       2,500 evacuation centres to house those displaced

·       2,400 people were isolated immediately after disaster

·       1.2 million homes without power

·       1.4 million homes without water

·       4,700 destroyed houses (50,000 damaged)

·       582 roads cut off

·       32 bridges destroyed

·       3.5 million people living in the most damaged areas

·       Anywhere between 85,000 and 316,000 people dead (unconfirmed because of rapid body decomposition in the heat and humidity and overwhelmed morgues resulting in mass graves)

·       30,000 injured

·       1 million made homeless (10% of the population)

·       250,000 dwellings destroyed or significantly damaged

·       60% of government buildings destroyed

·       80% of schools in capital and 60% in South and West provinces damaged or destroyed

·       UN headquarters in Haiti destroyed

Response ·       Tsunami warning issued 3 minutes after the earthquake

·       Emergency cabinet meeting convened

·       News conference held

·       Military sent in to help

·       Task force and disaster control team set up

·       Asked for help with search and rescue

·       Used social media to bring updates on the situation

·       Makeshift camps set up causing outbreaks of disease because of poor sanitation and proximity to decomposing bodies

·       Poor response from government

·       Problems with management of airports

·       4-day delay of supplies to remote areas resulting in looting and violence

·       Haitian government called off search on 23rd January (last survivor found on 8th February)

·       Lots of international response

·       No long-term strategy so problems still continue over 9 years since earthquake

This shows how much a country’s readiness and response to a disaster can really affect the recovery of the country. Although Japan’s earthquake should of had more of an impact on the country, because of the greater magnitude, it is Haiti that is still suffering because Japan had the education, money and resources to prepare themselves for the earthquake but Haiti had none of this.

This topic has really made me reflect on how the UK would cope in a situation like this and how much countries such as Haiti really need our support and help even now. This is a topic I would look into with older classes to help them understand how the impact of such disasters differ from country to country. With younger classes I would approach this subject and make them aware that disasters do cause injury, death and destruction but would mainly keep to how these events happen or form; just like what was presented in the micro teaching done by the cohort.

The main skill I used was critical thinking skills when looking at the case studies on Japan and Haiti and being able to form an opinion on the situation and to be able to able to compare them. I used a variety of skills when it came to preparing and presenting the micro teaching such as; research skills, communication skills, critical thinking, decision making and communication skills.

The Dr Bionic videos is a resource I would use for younger classes when doing this topic:

(These can also be accessed as seperate videos)

Red cross resources link

 

References

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (2019) About disasters [Online] Available: https://www.ifrc.org/en/what-we-do/disaster-management/about-disasters/ [Accessed: 2 November 2019]

Sustainable Development (n.d.) Case Study: Haiti  [Module resource] Available: Energy tab in Sustainable Development on Moodle [Accessed 2 November 2019]

Sustainable Development (n.d.) Case Study: Japan  [Module resource] Available: Energy tab in Sustainable Development on Moodle [Accessed 2 November 2019]