Integrated Arts Blog 2

This week’s focus in integrated arts was creativity. The definition of creativity is “the use of imagination or original ideas to create something; inventiveness”. In the lecture we were asked the question ‘are schools killing creativity?’ In schools, the focus is moving away from the creative subjects and moving towards the academic subjects. However, this … Continue reading Integrated Arts Blog 2

This week’s focus in integrated arts was creativity. The definition of creativity is “the use of imagination or original ideas to create something; inventiveness”. In the lecture we were asked the question ‘are schools killing creativity?’ In schools, the focus is moving away from the creative subjects and moving towards the academic subjects. However, this should not be the case as it is essential for pupils to express their creativity and the arts is the best way to do this. Czikszentmihalyi was a psychologist who believed that schools do not encourage their pupils to be creative. He stated “it seems schools do not have much impact on the lives of creative people. Schools seem to extinguish the interest and curiosity that the child had discovered outside its walls.” This shows that schools try to create critical thinkers rather than encourage creativity.

 

Firstly, in art we got the chance to make our own paintbrushes using multiple materials such as wool, thread and wooden sticks. This can be seen in the above picture on the right. The purpose of this task was to allow us to be creative by not using a regular paintbrush. We were allowed to use our imaginations and create our own idea of what a paintbrush should look like. We were then told to use our paintbrushes to paint a picture. A story was read out to us describing a scene which we had to remember and then paint. This encourages creativity as everyone’s pictures ended up looking different. We were able to imagine what the scene looked like and from memory, try to paint it, which can be seen in the above picture on the left. No one felt nervous about this task as everyone knew their picture would not turn out perfect as we used our homemade paintbrushes. This took the anxiety away from the task and everyone ended up enjoying themselves. Therefore, creativity is essential in the classroom. Children should be given the opportunity to use their imagination without the fear of looking bad in front of their peers. Tasks like the one we carried out would be great in the classroom as children would be free to express themselves without any embarrassment.

 During the music input we were discussing improvisation. In order for children to be creative during a music lesson they must have the opportunity to improvise. We were asked to play a solo on the xylophone. A tune was played in the background to assist us. Each person played a different tune. The point of this task is for us to show our creativity. It was also to teach us to that children need to be given the chance to use their imagination in schools and they do not always have to follow a guide or set of instructions. Teachers do not always have to plan lessons for pupils and give them step-by-step instructions, by letting children guide their own learning they are free to be creative and independent.

 Overall, creativity is vital for children and their education. Teachers need to be aware that they must teach creativity to a certain extent but also, they must let their pupils learn to be creative on their own. Both are important, and children must be allowed both within their education. Schools must encourage creativity rather than kill it. This does not have to be difficult, teachers can encourage creativity by allowing children to ask more questions and work collaboratively. By incorporating this into lessons we will be encouraging children to expressive themselves more. Curriculum for Excellence believes that creative learning is important within education and it can have a massive impact on children. They have stated “Creativity is a process which generates ideas that have value to the individual.  It involves looking at familiar things with a fresh eye, examining problems with an open mind, making connections, learning from mistakes and using imagination to explore new possibilities.” This means that children will have the chance to come up with their own ideas and thoughts on things, this encourages them to be expressive. The more children learn how to be creative the more their confidence will grow.

 

References

Creativity Across Learning 3-18 (2013) [online] Education Scotland. Available: http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/18518/7/Creativity3to18_tcm4-814361_Redacted.pdf [Accessed: 02 October 2018]

Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi (n.d) Creativity Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. Available: http://moodle1819.uws.ac.uk/pluginfile.php/45629/mod_resource/content/1/creativity-by-mihaly-csikszentmihalyi.pdf [Accessed: 02 October 2018]

Oxford dictionaries (n.d) [online] Available: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/creativity [Accessed: 02 October 2018]

Outdoor workshop

Group and leadership   Within our group, there was a range of different personalities and this showed quite early on in the task.  I felt as though I took control quite quickly, which is something I do often in practical tasks.  I don’t feel as though I was chosen to lead, I just presented my […]

Group and leadership

 

Within our group, there was a range of different personalities and this showed quite early on in the task.  I felt as though I took control quite quickly, which is something I do often in practical tasks.  I don’t feel as though I was chosen to lead, I just presented my idea to the group and everyone seemed to think it would work, so we carried out my idea.  Once my idea of constructing the roof was carried out everyone then started to get more ideas and gather resources that would help us build a sufficient den.  I personally don’t think anyone felt excluded within the group, everyone worked well together and suggested different ideas or ways to make it better.  Some ideas did not work but we still managed to successfully complete the task.  Most challenging for me is remembering that I cannot do everything on my own but to ensure I take a step back and let others take control.

 

Explaining

 

I thought the group explained their den very well.  They relayed all their ideas and what led them to creating their den the way they did. You could tell everyone was happy within their team and they enjoyed the task.  Everyone successfully presented all stages of the 5P’s very clearly and precisely.

 

Environment

 

We were lucky that the day we went out had been dry and it only started to rain as we were packing up which was a bonus, as I think trying to complete that task in the wind and rain would have dampened everyone’s mood slightly.  We also had to ensure we raised our voices a little when speaking to ensure everyone could hear us, just due to the wind blowing.  We had to make sure we used eye contact and body language to show where and what we were talking about.  I didn’t feel distracted when I was listening although I can understand how people could be.  To help overcome this I would ensure I was being engaging with everyone and raising my voice to ensure I was heard and keeping what I was talking about interesting for everyone.

 

Negotiation

 

Our negotiations were not successful, but I believe we had the hardest task of trying to get another person from another team to join us.  By the time we were asked to poach another member of a team everyone had built bonds and were pleased with their creation, so were staying loyal to their team. Something that should be encouraged.

 

Integrated Arts in Education Week 3.

In this mornings lecture, we began by listening to Tam O’Shanter, a poem by Robert Burns, and we discussed how this encouraged Malcolm Arnold’s composition. We then discussed what parts of the composition sounded inspired by the poem. We were then shown a website called ‘Ten Pieces’ which is created by the BBC. The website …

Continue reading “Integrated Arts in Education Week 3.”

In this mornings lecture, we began by listening to Tam O’Shanter, a poem by Robert Burns, and we discussed how this encouraged Malcolm Arnold’s composition. We then discussed what parts of the composition sounded inspired by the poem. We were then shown a website called ‘Ten Pieces’ which is created by the BBC. The website is aimed at children aged 7 to 14 and introduces them to the classical genre and encourages them to make creative responses to the pieces of music.

In this mornings art tutorial, we looked at emotional prompting cards which allows children to use higher order thinking skills. We looked at the image of a glove and discussed the connotations we took from it. The glove was half red and had a missing finger, the overall agreement was that there was disturbing and ambiguous connotations attached to the picture. I particularly enjoyed this activity as it allows you to think outside the box. We were provided with a sheet of scripted questions which allows us to consider the process, form, content and mood of artwork. We also had a look at a colouring book aimed to inspire boys to draw pictures and encourage their creativeness (See pictures attached). The Scaffolding theory, created by Jerome Bruner, is visible through the use of this colouring book. Scaffolding is a temporary support structure (the colouring book), that a child uses to attempt to understand new ideas and complete new tasks (McKoy, 2016). Eventually the support from the educator can be removed as they will not be needed and the child can continue to learn and develop for themselves. With the scaffolding process, the teacher will gradually extend on the activities as they see the child making progress. Eventually the scaffold can be removed and the child has made a clear achievement in their developmental progress thus, the child being creative in their artwork on their own (O’Hagan, Smith, 1999).

In the afternoon session, we referred back to the morning lecture. We were asked to listen to a piece of music and write down key words of how we feel from the music. We then separated into groups of four and used these words to create a 8-picture comic strip. The theme we decided to choose was the stages of a night out how it can be intense, calm, happy etc. I found this lesson to be very fun and will use it in future practice as it allows for children to explore music and art within the one activity.

References

McKoy, J. (2016)Jerome Bruner [Online] Available from: www.psychlotron.org.uk [Accessed: 2 October 2018].

O’Hagan, M., Smith, M, A. (1999). Early Years: Childcare and Education: Key Issues. 2ndEdition, Edinburgh, Bailliere Tindall.