Disasters

Disasters was a topic that I had a great interest in as I studied this throughout geography in high school and therefore had a vast knowledge of many of the disasters which engaged me more in the sessions. It was interesting to learn about concepts such as the progression of vulnerability where certain ELDCs’ due […]

Disasters was a topic that I had a great interest in as I studied this throughout geography in high school and therefore had a vast knowledge of many of the disasters which engaged me more in the sessions. It was interesting to learn about concepts such as the progression of vulnerability where certain ELDCs’ due to root causes are more vulnerable to certain dynamic pressures which in turn create unsafe conditions which mean they are less able to prepare for a disaster and to deal with the aftermath. Closely inspecting the role of international organisations provided me with some new knowledge as I could learn if they were politically neutral or not, what their priorities were and how they worked with governments within and between nations to effectively deal with short and long term impacts of disasters.

Furthermore, replicating experiments that can be done in classrooms was a useful insight into what considerations need to be made before conducting, for example, a volcano model with children as it may get very messy, especially with early years and first level, so this may be done as a whole class demonstration instead. The experiment we conducted in the workshop is shown via an accessible dropbox link below:

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A model illustrating a volcano that can be used as a whole class demonstration.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/u8kzgzwdceqmf2b/Snapchat-606110817.mp4?dl=0

We also looked at what can be done at a local, national and international level before, during and after a disaster, shown below:

Posters showing what can be done at a local, national and international level before, during and after a disaster occurs.

Posters showing what can be done at a local, national and international level before, during and after a disaster occurs.

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Moreover, working in groups we each presented a different disaster with a focus on a certain curriculum for excellence level where my group focused on typhoons with a view on teaching it to second level. This was an extremely useful experience as not only did it allow me to add to my existing subject knowledge but it also brought together different teaching ideas from different perspectives that I may not have thought of, for example, linking disasters to interdisciplinary learning through integrated arts with collages or models of volcanoes. It was also useful to gain teaching techniques when teaching a topic as sensitive as disasters as I learned that appropriate humour can be used to help children feel more comfortable with the disaster. It is also important to establish the seriousness of disasters but also bring the light-heartedness to it.

Learning about disasters has positively impacted how I feel about going on to teach this as many practical activities can be used to accompany the theory side of it to make it more enjoyable and engaging for children. Learning about each of the case studies that each group presented provided a real life context for children to relate to and it is required that I continue to refresh and update my knowledge on these case studies. I think it would be interesting to look at how different organisations have responded to disasters as Stout and Buono (n.d.) argued how seemingly “natural” disasters are actually social problems as many “government sponsored plans and programs of recovery and reconstruction tended to favour the interests of big business and the wealthy.” This would be useful in raising awareness to children of the social injustice and inequality that arises in our world as Stout and Buono (n.d.) continue to argue how lower class citizens and those of ethnic minority were not a priority in the aftermath of the recovery process. Therefore, it is important that I continue to research and find out more about such organisations and their roles in the aftermath of disasters.

References

Katrina A. Kathryn Stout, Ph. D. and Richard a. Dello Buono, Ph. D (n.d.) “Natural” Disasters are Social Problems: Learning from Katrina [Online] Available: http://moodle.uws.ac.uk/pluginfile.php/816810/mod_resource/content/1/Natural%20Disasters%20are%20social%20problems.pdf [Accessed: 5 November 2016].

Learning Log- 4th November

Theme: Disasters- microteaching Key Learning: This week we were to work in groups of 5/6 to prepare a presentation on a kind of disaster and present this to the rest of the class. My group chose fires and we were … Continue reading

Theme: Disasters- microteaching
Key Learning: This week we were to work in groups of 5/6 to prepare a presentation on a kind of disaster and present this to the rest of the class. My group chose fires and we were able to get across the conditions needed for these fires to burn, the impact of nature in relation to the spread of fires, where they occur most commonly and the impact on nature and humanity itself. We were also able to relate this to teaching and how we would go about teaching children about these natural disasters.
Impact on my views/lifestyle/practice: After listening to all the groups presentations on their own choice of disaster, I feel like I am a lot more well informed about how these take place and the impacts they can have on people’s lives and homes. Although it is unlikely that any of these disasters will happen so close to home I still plan to take security measures in order to be prepared if the event was ever to take place.
Areas of interest to explore further/develop: I am very interested in the work that charities have done in the past to help citizens out of a time of crisis and I am keen to look further into this and possibly see what help I could give.

The environment

I live in Kilmarnock which is quite a large town in East Ayrshire. It is the second largest town in Ayrshire with a population of 46,350. Physical Characteristics There are many housing estates in Kilmarnock, most of these are fairly new builds. However there are also many old, historical buildings such as the library & … Continue reading The environment

I live in Kilmarnock which is quite a large town in East Ayrshire. It is the second largest town in Ayrshire with a population of 46,350.
Physical Characteristics

There are many housing estates in Kilmarnock, most of these are fairly new builds. However there are also many old, historical buildings such as the library & museum ‘The dick institute’ which was opened in 1901. In the town centre there are lots of shops and a small shopping precinct, many of these shops are now closing down resulting in this area not being as lively as it once was. There are various retail parks with many shops, restaurants & a cinema etc.

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The dick institute

There are great road links to Glasgow with the fairly new motorway.
On the outskirts of the town there is a lot of greenery and fields surrounding the area.

 

Transport

Kilmarnock has a bus station where frequent buses run throughout Ayrshire and to Glasgow. There is also a train station with frequent services also running to most major towns. There are various taxi services in Kilmarnock.

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Kilmarnock Train Station

There are a lot of main roads and most people travel by car although it is easy to get to certain places by foot or by bike.

Community spaces

There is one college, thirteen primary schools, four secondary schools and eleven nurserys. There are four community centres, one library & one allotment.

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Kilmarnock Ayrshire College new campus

Recreation Spaces
There is one leisure centre with a swimming pool, gym, ice rink, squash halls, tennis courts etc. There are various other gyms around Kilmarnock, grass bowl facilities, tennis courts, football pitches and parks. There is one theatre called the Palace theatre/Grand hall which puts on many shows & pantomimes.

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The palace theatre

Population density
East Ayrshire’s population density is said to be 97 people per square metre by http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/HTMLDocs/dvc134_c/index.html

Air Quality
According to www.scottishairquality.co.uk Kilmarnock has low air quality index 3.

Climate Change

The climate change (Scotland) act 2009 is an act of the Scottish parliament. The act is split into various different parts including information on the target to reduce emissions which is set for 2050, advisory functions, reporting duties, duties of public bodies relating to climate change & other climate change provisions. This act has had … Continue reading Climate Change

The climate change (Scotland) act 2009 is an act of the Scottish parliament. The act is split into various different parts including information on the target to reduce emissions which is set for 2050, advisory functions, reporting duties, duties of public bodies relating to climate change & other climate change provisions.
This act has had an impact on my lifestyle as it has brought about the 5p carrier bag charges. These charges were introduced to encourage reusing bags and to prevent litter. This has definitely had an effect on myself as when previously I would always get a carrier bag I now use a bag for life or just use my handbag.carrier-bag-artwork-700x300-e1437642112685
From undertaking the ‘WWF Measure your footprint’ task I was shocked to discover my carbon footprint is 258% which is considerably high. My carbon breakdown showed that travel is what contributes most to my carbon footprint as I travel by bus a lot & have had 3 long plane journeys this year. The tips it provides to shrink my carbon footprint for this are to cycle or walk to work, unfortunately university & my work are not within walking/cycle distance from my house therefore I have to take public transport. ‘Stuff’ contributed the least to my carbon footprint at 8%, the tips I have been given to help this more are to recycle and buy second hand which I will definitely try.

wwf

Learning Log: Interdependence

Theme: Interdependence I really enjoyed the farm visit that we had for this input. Coming from a farming background myself, it was nice to see a different way of doing things. I think it is very important that we know … Continue reading

Theme: Interdependence

I really enjoyed the farm visit that we had for this input. Coming from a farming background myself, it was nice to see a different way of doing things. I think it is very important that we know and understand where our food/milk comes from.

I found the whole process very interesting and was amazed when I discovered that the cows spent their whole lives in this giant barn, as opposed to grazing in the fields. At first, this fact bothered me and I thought it was cruel to keep them from roaming in the fields, but after the farmer further explained it to us, I understood that it was not cruel as cows do not need a large amount of space to exercise and the shed was able to adjust itself to the weather outside. We saw this firsthand towards the end of our visit, when the temperature dropped and so the shed accommodated this by having large ‘shutters’ that closed.

I also loved the modern aspect this farm had compared to others I have been to. There were robots cleaning the ground where the cows lived to keep it more hygienic as well as a very large robot that went in a loop around the barn to push the feed closer to the cows. It was a very fresh take on dairy farming that I loved to see.

I think it would be very beneficial to children to see and understand where their food and milk came from to have a greater understanding of the world that we live in. I would love to take a class to a farm in the future, Strandhead farm especially!

 

Learning Log 26/10/2016

Theme: Natural Disasters Key Learning:  During the morning lecture, Louise came in to speak briefly about the assignment that we have to do and what is expected of us in it. After the lecture we attended a workshop also with Louise.  During this we looked at the classification of  disaster. From this I learned that … Continue reading Learning Log 26/10/2016

Theme:

Natural Disasters

Key Learning:

 During the morning lecture, Louise came in to speak briefly about the assignment that we have to do and what is expected of us in it.

After the lecture we attended a workshop also with Louise.  During this we looked at the classification of  disaster. From this I learned that it is only a disaster if or when society is impacted, this includes events such as: social disruption, material damage or loss of life. (Burton Et Al, 1978) believes that it can be classed as a disaster when it costs more than $1 million to repair the damage or if there are 100 or more deaths.

We also looked at the definition of a natural disaster and examples of what a natural disaster may be. Throughout this discussion I gathered that a natural disaster is a major event that comes from natural processes of the earth. This type of disaster can causes many problems and it can typically leave economic damage in it’s wake. However, the severity of said disasters depends on the affected population resilience or the ability to recover. A few examples that may be classed as a natural disaster may be: earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, etc.

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Nearer the end of the workshop we looked at a few case studies, including one from Haiti and one from Japan. From these case studies we gathered information about what the Government done in preparation for these sorts of disasters and also what they done after it in order to recover from it. For example, the Haiti Government had a poor response to the disaster and they handed over airport control to the US. However, on the other hand the Japanese government is among the best prepared in the world for disasters and they issued a warning 3 minutes after an earthquake.

In my opinion, I would say that it is important to bring in this sort of topic to teaching as it gives children an insight about what is happening in the world. It gives them information about how dangerous these sort of events can be, but it also allows them to see what can be done in preparation for it and what can also be done after it. However, I think it is important to be mindful about what we are saying and showing to the children. For example, it is important to inform children about it but it may not be suitable to show them images or videos of these sort of disasters as some of them may be quite graphic and therefore disturb some people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Impact on my views/lifestyle/practice:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Areas of interest to explore further/develop: