Tag Archive for 'Citizenship'

Global Citizenship – Connecting Classrooms

“In today’s globalised society, connecting, collaborating and working together with people in other countries is an increasing part of everyday reality – from business, to leisure and beyond.”

This introduction to Global Citizenship is from the British Council’s eTwinning schools portal 

“Bringing an International Dimension to Childrens’ Education has never been more important if we are to prepare them for life in the 21st century. eTwinning is all about enabling you, your pupils, your class and your school to connect and work with partners online. It is not about creating extra work, but providing a framework for exciting curriculum work with partners in another country. There are many benefits to linking up with another school.”

Click here also to see one definition of Global Citizenship from Oxfam, which a project like this could help support.

The British Council’s  Schools Online site provides support for collaboration between schools and advocates global citizenship for young people worldwide. This site provides a means for teachers to safely and securely find partner schools elsewhere in the world.

It has templates for projects to help get started. These are for various age groups and each has a different focus, whether for history, culture, geography, music, learning English or another language, or many other topics. These templates have downloadable resources and each also has a dedicated online forum for registered teachers to get support from others using the same project. There are teacher toolkits to support teachers in various aspects of any project, including a Guide to Technologies for Teachers. And there are links to how incorporating Global Citizenship into the work of your classroom fits curricular guidelines.

There are also links to many other online tools and resources (such as links to various resources specifically aimed at assemblies which also match to calendar events, such as national days around the world, festivals, celebrations, or international sporting events) all of which help support teachers in connecting classrooms across the globe.

Many teachers who have undertaken projects involving connecting their classroom with other classrooms elsewhere in the world often share how engaged their pupils are with their peers in the partner classrooms, and with the learning around which the collaboration has been built. And in the process many teachers also find an enthusiasm working with global colleagues which sparks development of further projects. So if you haven’t yet connected your classroom globally a good place to start is having a look at the resources at The British Council Schools Online portal.

How do our parliaments work in Scotland, the UK and the EU?

Is your class about to start learning about how our parliaments work?

There are resources aimed specifically at primary schools for learning about how the parliaments of our country work – whether that is the Scottish Parliament, the UK Parliament or the European Union. Each of these sites seek to provide information in engaging ways, whether through games or interactive activities, or by making history, facts, figures and and the whole language of the parliamentary system of interest to primary pupils.

The Scottish Parliament Education Service has a site on which you will find resources to help pupils undertaking their own reading and research about the Scottish Parliament,  as well as interactive games, information about visits, teaching resources and an interactive timeline of the Parliament from 1235 to the present day. In addition there are short videos about “What we do” describing different roles in Parliament, as well as a word bank of Parliamentary terms explaining many of the words used when talking about the work of Parliament. 

The UK Parliament Education Service site http://www.parliament.uk/education/has a game site called “My UK” where the player in the game can take charge of Britain, make new laws, and create a country to call your own. In the game you take charge of Britain, choose and pass new laws, customise your country, and pursue your personal vision of the UK. 

There are also 40 videos with MPs talking about Parliament; there is an interactive tour of Parliament; there is a “Who am I” quiz game; fact sheets and animations explaining how laws are made – all written with the primary age group in mind (there are sections for different age groups).

Europa – Gateway to the European Union has a site of resources for schools teaching about the European Union. There are interactive games, quizzes and factsheets presented in different formats for different reading levels. There are interactive simulations where pupils can work through a variety of issues which are dealt with through the European Union, letting pupils take decisions based on information provided, and letting children see the consequences of their decisions in the simulations. There are also videos on a variety of topics.

Seomra Ranga has resources for primary schools in Ireland which can be adapted for use elsewhere – whether vocabulary posters and tools or classroom resources for teaching about voting.

In addition to the resources (games, quizzes, videos, simulations or factsheets) which are aimed at children using them themselves, each of these sites provide teaching resources aimed at supporting teachers make teaching about each of the Parliaments informative, intersting and engaging.

Breaking News – literacy activities for the classroom on stories making the news

http://www.breakingnewsenglish.com/ Breaking News English is a site by Sean Banville aimed at teachers looking for activities for learners of English in the context of stories making the headlines in the media.  This contains Lesson Plans & Podcasts for combining studying Current Events and News while also learning English.

Keep up with the news and learn English – Reading, Writing, Listening & Speaking

For each news story there are associated activities provided.  The story is presented as text as well as a downloadable mp3 file for listening to the story. The activities include a series of imaginative guided warm-up discussion activities, as well as a range of activities for pupils to undertake prior to reading the story or listening to it (which provide pupils with the chance to say what they know about the story just from the headline, in addition to looking at some of the language used).  Then there are activities to complete while listening to the story.  This is then followed with a wide range of actvities based on the text – which includes things like multiple choice questions, discussions based on themes raised, and extended writing activities which can be undertaken within a class or as follow-up activities.

There are answer keys provided for all activities.  The combination of activities for supporting teaching English language with news stories keeps the learning in a meaningful context.

The site also has a searchable database of previous stories which can be searched on themes or keywords.

Rapping the News – rhyming current affairs in the classroom

http://theweekinrap.com/ is exactly what the title says!  Every week some main stories in the news from this US site are reported in rap.  The quick rhythmic rhyming delivery allied to the mix of news footage, animations and special effects in the video makes for engaging viewing.

Teachers often look to have pupils discuss current affairs in class and The Week in Rap provides one way to quickly recap what’s happened in the week past. Each video covers a week of news in just a few minutes of viewing.  Because they are retrospetive this gives teachers a chance to preview before use in the classroom to check for relevance and suitability. The site also archives each of the videos. You can also search for key words.

The text of each video is included below each video which lets teachers quickly preview the content.  This also lets pupils join in if they wish. And the rap text also contains hyperlinks on each key phrase to the stories in the news which provides more information on any of the news stories mentioned in the rap. 

The videos may also provide inspiration for ideas for pupils to create their own video presentations, whether of current affairs reported in the media, or to report on events in their own school or locality. If pupils wish to create their own multimedia presentations in a similar vein the following may be useful:

Windows Live Movie Maker, SAM Animation and Photostory 3 are three free pieces of software which pupils can use to create their own videos. For images free to use in such projects click on each link here. Pupils will probably wish to record their audio track first and Audacity is a free piece of software which lets users record and edit their audio and create a file in mp3 format which can be imported into the video before then adding the images. And if they wish to use a music backing track which is free to use click here for a number of sources of music free to use in pupil projects.

Click here for instructions for writing a rap in a classroom.

Walking Safely Along the Digital Highway – resources to help teach Digital Literacy and e-Safety

There are many resources available to help support schools to teach pupils to be responsible users of the Internet and to educate pupils to be as safe as possible when using online tools.  Here are some resources to support teaching digital literacy:

Online simulation for aimed at teenage pupils (but useful for teachers and younger pupils who may be using social networking tools) using networking sites to show dangers and precautions to take – interactive activities and helpful videos and scenarios.

PrivEazy is a comprehensive series of presentations and quizzes all devoted to keeping you safe online. You can choose from categories of tools and applications (including web browsing, Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, home wi-fi, Windows, mobile locational services, Android, and much more). Each category then has a presentation on-screen, as well as a quiz, and checklists of prompts to then undertake the steps described in the presentation to put the tips into practice. You can use the resource without signing up but if you do sign up then you can see your own progress through the various categories and come back time and again to use what you need when you need it.

Power to the Parent from Common Sense Media is a series of videos aimed at dealing with online issues relating to children’s use of online spaces, including media awareness, sexting, and celebrity culture.

Edutopia Cyberbullying & Internet Digital Citizenship a range of resources to support teaching about how to deal with issues around using social media by pupils.

Jog-the-Web Internet Safety interactive activities – a collection of resources using a frame “Jog the Web” which highlights a progression.  Jog the Web also allows for comments to be added above each online resource to highlight activities or the application in a particular context.

Action on Rights for Children – Parent Guide to Data Privacy – a PDF document.  Information about children is collected from the moment they are born. Some of this is necessary, some isn’t – and some of it is gathered without your even being aware that it is happening. It is important that you know what data is being collected, what it’s used for and how to keep as much control over it as possible.  This document provides examples and advice about how to keep in control of data about you or your children.

Blog-posting about internet filtering in schools – the background to why and how web filtering happens in schools, from a school, local authority and national perspective.

Guide to Internet Filtering in School by Alan Mackenzie (the E-safety Advisor) is a description of the reasons for school internet filtering, the mechanics of how decisions are taken as to what is filtered and in what ways, and the decision-making processes employed by staff at various levels.

Google Internet literacy/e-safety interactive resources for teachers Google’s resources to support the education of families on how to stay safe online. In tandem with online safety organization iKeepSafe this provides a digital literacy curriculum that educators can use in the classroom to teach what it means to be a responsible online citizen. The curriculum is designed to be interactive, discussion filled and allow students to learn through hands-on and scenario activities. On this site you’ll find a resource booklet for both educators and students that can be downloaded in PDF form, presentations to accompany the lesson and animated videos to help frame the conversation. Google also produce digital literacy resources to guide users through steps they can take to protect themselves online with Good to Know.

National Glow Group on Internet Safety and Responsible Use – a Glow username log-in and password is required to access this Glow Group.  It is a place to access resources shared between Scottish schools and local authorities and to discuss and comment on what has been found to be useful for different situations. Glow username required.

Tips for Teachers on Staying Safe in Social Networking Sites – from Association of American Educators Articles often appear in the media about the dangers of social networking sites to professionals, and particularly to teachers. This site provides practical solutions - general and school specific tips to consider as teachers assess their own online profiles.

Using Facebook Safely – A Guide for Professionals Working With Young People - Yorkshire & Humber Grid for Learning guidance document on using Facebook, which will be useful for staff working in schools.

Netsmartz Social Networking safety videos for older pupils these resources are designed to help empower children aged 8 – 12 to make safer online choices through lessons taught in a series of animated videos highlighting the Internet-related adventures of a diverse cast of teenagers. Educators may reinforce the videos’ safety lessons through the use of accompanying activity cards.  The site also houses real-life stories videos—a series of narratives from teens about real experiences of online situations. Each of the videos is accompanied by an activity card to facilitate student discussion and understanding. These materials are suggested for those aged 11 and above.

Common Sense Media Digital Literacy and Citizenship Classroom Curriculum A series of detailed lessons for primary pupils covering various aspects of using online spaces effectively and safely. These lessons cover privacy, digital footprint issues, copyright, searching techniques, evaluating websites and more. There are also lessons from this site for other age groups.

Garfield Comic character on Internet Safety a series of interactive, animated lessons using the character of Professor Garfield to provide these first lessons on Internet safety along with guidance for students, teachers, and parents.

Privacy Playground is a game aimed at 8-10 year olds designed to teach about online advertising, spam and keeping private details private.

Cyber-Safety Video a blog posting and associated video highlighing for children aged 8-10 the dangers of social networking.

Parenting Online Safety Booklet from Wired.org What do parents do we do when their eight-year-old knows more than they do about cyberspace? How do they guide their children safely through this online world? How do they set the rules when they perhaps don’t even understand the risks? This document online provides some safety tips. Parenthood is never easy and the ground rules are always changing.

E-safety classroom posters free to download and print free to download colourful A3 posters to help raise awareness in the classroom to the important issues regarding cyber-safety, e-security and digital citizenship.  There are different posters for different age-groups and for different areas of online safety such as password security, cyber-bullying, netiquette, scames, spam and much more.

Safer Internet Posters from SaferInternet are printable posters for use in schools. There are two versions of these, one aimed at younger pupils (6-11 year olds) and another for older pupils (11-16 year olds). The posters highlight, in a positive way, how children and young people should behave online as well as identifying some of the benefits of being online. They are available in 3 different sizes including A3 as a classroom poster and A5 for use in books.

Do I share a photograph of my friend…..? is a poster (from Common Sense Media) aimed at pupils to help them consider the issues involved before sharing online any photographs they take

E-safety activities for primary school pupils from CBBC – with links to other online esafety sites

Teaching Themes – Staying Safe Online – ideas for online and offline activities

11 E-safety resources for pupils, teachers and parents

www.thinkuknow.co.uk/ThinkUKnow resources aimed at different age groups and with materials for parents and teachers.

360 degree esafety audit – document version with all levels with descriptions

360 degree E-Safety School Review Tool – from SWGfL

29 Steps to Internet Safety for Kids is a post byDeb Ng on steps to take for all online.

The NEN E-Safeguarding Tool is an online application that can help schools to ensure that ICT is used safely and responsibly and that risks related to ICT use are properly managed.

The audit considers Roles and Responsibilities and E-Safeguarding Procedures, including; Risk Assessment, Data Classification, Access Control, Use of Systems, Password Policies, Incident Reporting, Remote Access, Technical Security. Simply click on the E-Safeguarding Tool and answer each question as it is presented to you. As you answer each question the system will suggest the next steps for improving your schools E-Safeguarding procedures and where appropriate direct you to further sources of information and help. You can stop the audit at any point, save your answers and resume the audit later on. When you have completed the audit you can print out your answers along with the recommended next steps.

Microsoft’s comprehensive guide to security, privacy and safety online for policy-makers can be found at http://www.microsoft.com/about/twc/en/us/policymakers.aspx. This deals with issues relating to security, privacy and safety for policymakers and individuals, provide background information on current issues, guidance, and information about Microsoft tools.
Purple Mash E-Safety To support teaching and learning around E-safety there are 7 Safer Internet activities. These are targeted at upper primary children who may be beginning to venture that bit further into the online world.

http://www.digitalme.co.uk/safe/ Digital Me provides interactive esafety activities for pupils, and associated teaching resources for teachers.

http://www1.k9webprotection.com/ K9 Web Protection is a free Internet filter and parental control software (free download) for home computer (or mobile device).  It provides tools for parents to control unwanted content their family.

Norton Online Family is a free online tool to help parents to monitor the Internet activities of their children, from anywhere, in real time. Sign up for a free parent account and then it guides you through setting up house rules for your family in collaboration with your children, setting the agreed boundaries. And these can be changed by the parent as children grow in age and responsibility.  

Amber Coggin has produced a SMART Notebook file for use with a SMART Board which is in the form of a Facebook template.  This can be used to reinforce safety messages about the use of social networking tools.  The SMART Notebook file can be edited so that pupils can create their mock page for a historical character.  Click here to access this resources: http://smartboardgoodies.com/2011/02/11/facebook-page-template-notebook/

Alternatively from the iLearn Blog http://t.co/nXhLLC3 comes the links to use online fake social media pages Fakebook and Twister created by @russeltarr to teach about the use of Facebook and Twitter. Use them by getting the pupils to create fictional pages for historical characters or create fictional characters in creative writing.  While there is then the curricular purpose with a creative tool there is also the opportunity to reinforce the message about safe use of social networking tools.

Further tools for teaching about safer use of social networking tools like Facebook while also teaching about historical figures can be found on Richard Byrne’s blogpost here

FaceMoods’ Online Safety Little Red Riding Mood – this is a series of videos aimed at children to alert them to how to be safer users of online social media sites.

Highland E-safety E-safety resources from Highland Council including Cyberbullying interactive activities for pupils, and a host of links to resources for pupils, teachers and parents.

E-safety cartoons Shared by @OllieBray – e-safety cartoons for schools to display.  These are aimed mainly in schools  supporting the role parents play in educating their children to be aware of the issues for their children, and what they can do.

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/6-internet-safety-games-kids-cyber-smart/ From the MakeUseOf site comes a collection of 6 Internet Safety Games To Help Kids Become Cyber Smart:

Webonauts Internet Academy – about the rules of web safety and digital citizenship where children have to complete a series of missions in order to graduate from the Webonauts Internet Academy. The lessons follow the motto – Observe, Respect, and Contribute.

Safety Land – is a game about battling a villain who is spamming people with messages.

Internet Safety Hangman – where the clues all relate to cyber rules you should remember and follow.

Iggey and Rasper’s Internet Safety Game – is about net etiquette for kids.

Anti-Phishing Phil – is a game about phishing scames on the internet.

OnGuard Online – covers spyware detection to wireless security.

From David Andrade’s blog “Educational Technology Guy” http://goo.gl/fb/Udlkg came the following link to the NorthWest Learning Grid Digital Literacy interactive tool – http://www.nwlg.org/digitalliteracy/ pupils select what they do online then follow a series of interactive activities which help them become aware of issues and suggested behaviours in each environment.

The European Union Safer Internet competition site lists entries from around the EU – all designed to teach online safety, some created by children and some by companies
http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/activities/sip/events/competition/winners/index_en.htm

In a choice of language from the Council of  Europe comes Through the Wild Web Woods at http://www.wildwebwoods.org/ - game aimed at 7-10 year olds to support children in becoming digitally literate.
Raising Digital Kids – parenting guide wiki http://raisingdigitalkids.wikispaces.com/

The Digital Citizenship Wiki created by Dr Alec Couros on keeping safe online by educating children to be digitally literate while using online tools creatively has a wide range of links to  resources designed to help everyone stay safe while online:
http://couros.wikispaces.com/digitalcitizenship

Digital Citizenship teaching resources collected by Kyle Pace can be found at http://www.sophia.org/packets/digital-citizenship – these resources and activities help support teaching pupils to use online resources productively and in a safe and responsible way.
In order to keep be kept aware of how you or your school are mentioned online a free tool which can be used to send automated e-mails to you is Google Alert.  Setting up a Google Alert for the school’s name and for individuals to  consider doing the same for themselves at http://www.google.com/alerts means an email (or a feed) can provide information of when the name is mentioned online.

In a similar way specifically for mentions on Twitter anyone can set an alert at http://www.twilert.com/- that way you can be sent a message when someone on Twitter mentions you or your school by name.

That’s Not Cool http://www.thatsnotcool.com/ – this US site is aimed at teenagers specifically to help them work out what’s acceptable to them and what is not, and courses of action for when someone pressures or disrespects them online or via mobile ‘phone. That’s Not Cool uses digital examples of controlling, pressuring and threatening behaviour and provides strategies for dealing with them.

Shambles Internet safety links> a host of links to resources on keeping safe online

USA Today – Education – Staying Safe Online – provides resources and links to sources of additional resources to support teachers in teaching about safety online.

ThinkB4U is a website which comprises a series of videos of family scenarios involving a variety of online situations. Each is designed to help give pause for thought about what anyone should do before they click! As more of our life happens online, Internet skills are crucial to living responsibly. ThinkB4U is a collaboration between Google, Common Sense Media, ConnectSafely, and the National Consumers League with the joint aim to tackle digital literacy in a fun and interactive way. Topics covered include identity protection, fraud detection, and digital citizenship. Each scenario location includes several video shorts about a modern family’s experience online. The viewer has to determine which path the family members take at the critical decision point. Do you send that text? Do you make that purchase? Or many more decisions where you are encouraged to take a moment to think before acting and consider the issues involved. The site incorporates some techniques of games-based learning – as users view each video, they can collect interactive objects, each of which opens up a quick game about the subject of the video. Throughout the site there are linked resources and more information on any topic for each user whatever their role, whether pupil, parent or teacher.

E-Safety Live are events bringing online safety providers, experts and industry leaders together to share information and resources on the latest online safety topics with education practitioners in the UK to better help safeguard children, as well as professionals, when online. Workshops by organisations such as Facebook, Vodafone, Xbox (Microsoft) and CEOP can be attended throughout the day as well as opportunities to get those burning questions answered by knowledgeable professionals.

Budd:e Cybersecurity Education package consists of two activity-based learning modules, one for primary school pupils, and one for secondary school pupils. Both modules contain media-rich activities and resources. There are also comprehensive Teacher Resources for Budd:e including background and contextual information, a video demonstration of the modules, lesson plans with learning outcomes for each activity, and curriculum maps.

Ask a Tech teacher – Teaching e-safety - this post is a description of the resources used at each year stage of primary school in one school, explaining what concepts are introduced at specific age-groups and resources they use to support them.

Wildcat Web Safety Wiki is a great collection of  e-safety videos created by pupils themselves, each showing an example of an issues pupils may meet online, and the advice for safeguarding themselves. There is an extensive menu of e-safety topics. Each topic page is presented with an introuductory voki providing a spoken explanation of the issue. Then there is a summary of the vidoe, and the video itself. Each video features pupils talking about that issue and giving advice on what to do in response to keep safe. A useful resource in itself for use by pupils both in providing advice, and in providing providing a model which could be an activity which could be replicated by other school, or used as the inspiration to prompt alternative ideas for engaging pupils in e-safety.

Gift Cards for Parents to Share with their child when giving them a gift of a device - these cards have safety messages about what the child receiving the gift (there are cards specific to smartphone, tablet, gaming device or computer) would be expected to consider and expected behaviours. The cards contain spaces with each statement where the parent can fill in expectations they have of their specific child in relation to that statement. And in addition the card also has a statement of expectations the child can expect of the parent in relation to the use of the device. Everything is able to be adapted to any specific family situation, but provides a useful template for parents to think about their child’s behaviours and the parent’s responses.

From England’s Department for Education comes Advice on child internet safety Universal guidelines for providers. This document – compiled by members of the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) – draws together the most effective messages for keeping children safe online. 

Joan Walker has used Scoop.it to collate resources as they becomae available on the topic of E-safety and e-safeguarding. This therefore can be handy to see new materials appear which have been tagged with either term.




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