GamesCon 2020 and IGBE

Improving Gender Balance and Equalities

Research suggests that there can be benefits to playing video games in terms of developing problem-solving, cognitive function and special awareness skills (Gee, 2005; Adachi and Willoughby, 2013; Green and Bavelier, 2006; Przybylski, 2014; Subrahmanyam and Greenfield, 1994; Spence and Feng, 2010; Connolly et al., 2012). Research by OECD (2015) shows that pupils who play video games have higher success when sitting computer-based tests, specifically in problem-solving and mathematics. The OECD also suggests that pupils who interact with computer software are more confident when faced with the prospect of a computer-based test.

It is widely known that more boys interact on a regular basis with video-gaming software than girls. It is vital that we encourage all pupils to interact positively with computer software so that all pupils can benefit from the skill development and confidence working with technology can bring. By encouraging and empowering boys and girls to engage with technology in a positive way, we move closer to closing the gender-based gap within the STEM subjects and inspire more pupils to consider a diverse range of curricular areas and learner pathways.

As part of CfE’s Health and Well-being Experience’s and Outcomes under ‘Planning for choices and change’, we ask that learners “experience activities which enable them to develop the skills and attributes they will need if they are to achieve and sustain positive destinations beyond school”. In a world where technology is ever present in the work place, it is important that all young people are provided opportunities to engage in exciting learning opportunities, such as GamesCon 2020.

GamesCon 2020 and Expressive arts

Expressive Arts

During the event students could be,

  • creating characters and graphics for their game
  • creating presentations and videos as part of their research
  • creating music and sound effects to use in their game

Expressive Arts Experiences and Outcomes

Experiences in the expressive arts involve creating and presenting and are practical and experiential.

I have experienced the energy and excitement of presenting/performing for audiences and being part of an audience for other people’s presentations/performances. EXA 0-01a / EXA 1-01a / EXA 2-01a 

I have the opportunity to choose and explore an extended range of media and technologies to create images and objects, comparing and combining them for specific tasks. EXA 2-02a

I can create and present work that shows developing skill in using the visual elements and concepts. EXA 2-03a

I can develop and communicate my ideas, demonstrating imagination and presenting at least one possible solution to a design problem. EXA 2-06a

I can use my voice, musical instruments and music technology to experiment with sounds, pitch, melody, rhythm, timbre and dynamics.  EXA 2-17a

Inspired by a range of stimuli, and working on my own and/or with others, I can express and communicate my ideas, thoughts and feelings through musical activities. EXA 1-18 / EXA 2-18a

Click the above graphic to access the document

GamesCon and LIteracy and English links to CfE

GamesCon and Literacy and English

During the event the students would most likely be engaged or participating in activities in Literacy and English:

 

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Listening and Talking

 

Working in the GamesCon 2020 competition will allow, at various levels the development of literacy skills.

 

I develop and extend my literacy skills when I have opportunities to:

  • communicate, collaborate and build relationships
  • reflect on and explain my literacy and thinking skills, using feedback to help me improve and sensitively provide useful feedback for others
  • engage with and create a wide range of texts
  • develop my understanding of what is special, vibrant and valuable about my own and other cultures and their languages in different media, taking advantage of the opportunities offered by ICT
  • extend and enrich my vocabulary through listening, talking, watching and reading.

Examples of some relevant Literacy and English experiences and outcomes from the latest CfE publication

Reading

Tools for reading – to help me use texts with increasingly complex or unfamiliar ideas, structures and vocabulary within and beyond my place of learning

  • Through developing my knowledge of context clues, punctuation, grammar and layout, I can read unfamiliar texts with increasing fluency, understanding and expression. ENG 2-12a / ENG 3-12a
  • I can select and use a range of strategies and resources before I read, and as I read, to make meaning clear and give reasons for my selection. LIT 2-13a

Finding and using information – when reading and using fiction and nonfiction texts with increasingly complex ideas, structures and specialist vocabulary

  • Using what I know about the features of different types of texts, I can find, select and sort information from a variety of sources and use this for different purposes. LIT 2-14a
  • I can make notes, organise them under suitable headings and use them to understand information, develop my thinking, explore problems and create new texts, using my own words as appropriate. LIT 2-15a

Writing

Tools for writing – using knowledge of technical aspects to help my writing communicate effectively within and beyond my place of learning

  • Throughout the writing process, I can check that my writing makes sense and meets its purpose. LIT 2-23a
  • I consider the impact that layout and presentation will have and can combine lettering, graphics and other features to engage my reader. LIT 2-24a

Listening and Talking

Tools for listening and talking – to help me when interacting or presenting within and beyond my place of learning

  • When I engage with others, I can respond in ways appropriate to my role, show that I value others’ contributions and use these to build on thinking. LIT 2-02a

Finding and using information – when listening to, watching and talking about texts with increasingly complex ideas, structures and specialist vocabulary

  • As I listen or watch, I can identify and discuss the purpose, main ideas and supporting detail contained within the text, and use this information for different purposes. LIT 2-04a
  • I can select ideas and relevant information, organise these in an appropriate way for my purpose and use suitable vocabulary for my audience. LIT 2-06a
Curriculum for Excellence, LIteracy and English Documentation
CfE Literacy and English

 

You will be able to better choose the most appropriate E’s and O’s for the young people engaging in the competition.

The process of working through the competition brief is a very good opportunity for holistic assessment based around the clusters of Es and Os highlighted above

For further information on the Expectations and Outcomes document please click on the image above

Computational Thinking

 What is computational thinking?

Computers can be used to help us solve problems. However, before a problem can be tackled, the problem itself and the ways in which it could be solved need to be understood.

Computational thinking allows us to do this.

Computational thinking allows us to take a complex problem, understand what the problem is and develop possible solutions. We can then present these solutions in a way that a computer, a human, or both, can understand.

The four cornerstones of computational thinking

There are four key techniques (cornerstones) to computational thinking:

  • decomposition – breaking down a complex problem or system into smaller, more manageable parts
  • pattern recognition – looking for similarities among and within problems
  • abstraction – focusing on the important information only, ignoring irrelevant detail
  • algorithms – developing a step-by-step solution to the problem, or the rules to follow to solve the problem

Each cornerstone is as important as the others. They are like legs on a table – if one leg is missing, the table will probably collapse. Correctly applying all four techniques will help when programming a computer.  (More information HERE  )

Barefoot Computing is a great FREE resource , and the resources are mapped to Curriculum for Excellence and the current Experience and Outcomes. The materials provide learning opportunities to support aspects of the broad general education Computing Science curriculum within the Technologies whilst also providing interdisciplinary experiences across the curriculum.

Barefoot add Logic and Evaluation as key concepts, but you will see the Computational Thinking concepts and approaches could be used anywhere in the curriculum.

 

Barefoot Computing

Registration for Barefoot resources is FREE and you can even book a free CLPL twilight at your school for all the teachers.

Full information is on the site, and I would encourage you to explore and make use of the many ready to use in CfE lesson plans.