Clishmaclaver – Brechin High Library Blog

April 20, 2017
by Miss Stewart
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Crossing the Godzilla Threshold…

Really, this is just an excuse to post a picture of Godzilla – my absolute hero! – toying with Marvel’s Avengers. Because, Hawkeye! 😀 Obsessive fangirl much?  😉

So anyway, yesterday I read a quirky article in The Guardian’s culture & film pages – Apes, vampires or giant crabs: which movie apocalypse would you prefer? – and I just thought I’d share! Apparently, “Whether you’re hiding from Godzilla or fleeing the zombie masses, some films prove you might just be better off flinging yourself into the sea.” The author of this muy serio article goes on to argue that based on a recent list of all the different ways the world might end, in turn based on scenarios from films, ‘people’ have stated how they would respond; “It is stupid, and now I will explain why on a scenario-by-scenario basis.”

Have a read; it’s good fun. And, if I can just interject, now seems like the perfect time to talk about the Godzilla Threshold trope. C’mon! How often do I get to slip a literary reference to that particular rhetorical device into casual conversation..? 😉

…every so often, the time comes when the threat is so great, the situation has gone so horribly wrong, that there is no proportionate response. When circumstances are so dire as to justify the use of any and every thing that might solve it, no matter how reckless, nonsensical, or horrific, regardless of cost. When even the summoning of Godzilla, king of the monsters and patron saint of collateral damage, could not possibly make the crisis any worse. Every so often, the situation crosses the Godzilla Threshold.” – TV Tropes

And there’s just no coming back from that. 😉

Art credit: Comic Vine

April 18, 2017
by Miss Stewart
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The long read…

The rise of social reading: Goodbye to Virginia Woolf's solitary, egoless reader

The rise of social reading: Goodbye to Virginia Woolf’s solitary, egoless reader

This thought-provoking article on, ‘the state of reading,’ from Salon [breaking news, politics, entertainment, culture, and technology through investigative reporting, commentary, criticism, and provocative personal essays] is our long read for April. 🙂 “Virginia Woolf’s ideal reader is now under siege by interactive technology, as we pursue a party on the page.”

Art credit: © 2017 Salon Media Group, Inc.

April 17, 2017
by Miss Stewart
0 comments

My Love/Hate Relationship with Marvel Comics

Another readable blog from Booknerdlandia, this time focusing on issues of ‘gender’ in Marvel Comics, but also contributing to the on-going ‘diversity’ stooshie ignited by a recent Marvel press conference; as per previously discussed by Clishmaclaver. 😉

…top editors and writers’ habit of blaming readers for the failure of books to find an audience, or the vice president of sales outright blaming declining sales on “diversity,” Marvel has been doing its best to make it look like it doesn’t care about anyone outside of its core audience of cis-het white men who buy single issues from local comic stores.” – Book Riot

Art credit© 2017 MARVEL

April 17, 2017
by Miss Stewart
0 comments

How To Speak To Children With Anxiety

Advice For Parents On What To Say And What Not To Say –

Exam time, with all its anxiety-causing stressors, is almost upon us. Clishmaclaver found this article from The Huffington Post which offers some useful advice, c/o YoungMinds’ parents helpline, for this most stressful time of year, and beyond: “Many children and young people don’t know what they are feeling when they are anxious, and it can be very frightening and overwhelming,” Emma Saddleton, YoungMinds’ parents helpline manager previously told HuffPost UK.

Check out Clishmaclaver’s previous posts on study skills for some extra input into coping with exam stress.

And, remember to look after yourself. 🙂

Art credit: Neuroscience News

April 17, 2017
by Miss Stewart
0 comments

The 35 Best Lines From Jane Eyre

This Book Riot Booknerdlandia post [from April 21st] is a celebration of the wit and wisdom contained in Charlotte Brontë’s seminal work, Jane Eyre. You could do worse than give this classic of English literature a chance; read it – you won’t regret it! 🙂

Jane Eyre is my favorite classic novel of all time. It’s hauntingly beautiful, eloquently written, daringly progressive, and a terrific love story to boot. Eyre was one of the first literary heroines to command recognition of feminine fortitude, wit, and desire. Like her creator, she was a heroine ahead of her time, and her story is peppered with nuggets of wisdom that are just as relevant today as they were 169 years ago when the book was first published. Today is Charlotte Brontë’s 200th birthday. To celebrate, here are 35 of my favorite quotes from Jane Eyre, loosely sorted by topic. Quotes by characters other than Jane are noted. – Book Riot

The library’s copy of Jane Eyre can be found in the Classics Collection!

From Gotham to Glasgow…

April 17, 2017 by Miss Stewart | 2 Comments

Image result for frank quitely art of comics kelvingrove

As previously posted, Clishmaclaver popped down to Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum’s exhibition, Frank Quitely: The Art of Comics, this Easter weekend – and it was every bit as good as anticipated. 😀 More than just a breathtaking portfolio of Quitely’s amazing skill and range, and the seldom seen craft – scripts, proof sheets and original sketches – of comic-making, “The Art of Comics also shows influence and context for this genre from the historical, with the universal structure of the heroic myth and the Scottish tradition of storytelling, through to the modern, with current affairs and technological development.” – Kelvingrove AGandM.

“Frank Quitely is the alter ego of Glasgow born artist Vincent Deighan. Deighan took on the mantle of Frank Quitely in his early career to hide his identity while he drew for the Scottish publication Electric Soup. Now the name Frank Quitely is synonymous with iconic characters such as Superman, Batman and the X-Men. A world renowned artist in hot demand he’s currently finishing off the epic story Jupiter’s Legacy with fellow Scottish comic book legend, writer Mark Millar.

The exhibition at Kelvingrove will be the largest collection of his work ever displayed. You can get up close and personal with the painstaking detail in every iconic frame. There will also be original artwork from titans of the comic book industry such as Frank Millar and Neal Adams as well as an original Batman comic strip by Batman creator Bob Kane. And of course the exhibition wouldn’t be complete without including the strip that inspired it all, The Broons!” – Kelvingrove AGandM.

I just loved this exhibition! It is an absolutely mesmerising display of the development of Quitely’s unique style, curated across an array of the most famous comic book characters of all time: Batman and Robin, Superman, Judge Dredd, Wonder Woman, The X-Men, etc. It was a shock for me to discover that Quitely had even illustrated a ‘Destiny’ story for Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman: Endless Nights graphic novel, back in 2003! 😮 I read – and loved – all the Sandman comics back in the day, but that Gaiman was included in Quitely’s body of work just hadn’t clicked with me!

And, I confess I made use of the gallery’s superhero props (!) to pose for photos, but I’m definitely not sharing any of those here! 😀

Frank Quitely: The Art of Comics is on until October. If you’ve got the time and means to go see it, I highly recommend it to you. You don’t have to be a comic book aficionado to get a lot of pleasure out of viewing this exhibition – or engaging with the interactive digital displays that accompany it –  you just have to be someone who appreciates art, and storytelling. Oh, and maybe The Broons too!

Art credit: The Daily Record; The Evening Express; a mate’s camera! 😉

@Kelvin.GlasgowMuseums  @KelvingroveArt

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